The Annual Film Production Insurance Package Made Easy

Posted by David Hamilton on Sep 13, 2017 4:46:15 PM

The Annual DICE Insurance Policy takes the hassle out of purchasing film insurance for your film productions. It is flexible, affordable, and customizable designed to fit your individual needs. 

This policy will not only save you time, it will also save you money. Insuring all your productions under one policy helps to cut the costs, as it will reduce the administrative expenses associated with insuring each production individually, and these savings are passed onto you.

The Annual DICE Policy is specially designed to provide:  insurance for commercials, documentary insurance, coporate video insurance,educational film insurance, music video insurance, training video insurance, short film insurance, and still photography insurance.

Check out our Infographic below for coupon savings and more.

DICE Infographic Hyperlink.jpg

Interested in seeing more? Visit the Front Row Insurance Website for a free no obligation quote!

Tags: DICE Insurance, DICE Policy, Entertainment Insurance, Front Row Insurance Brokers, corporate video insurance, Documentary Insurance, Commercial Production Insurance, music video insurance, music video production insurance, educational film production insurance, Short Film Insurance, Educational Film Insurance, Film Production Insurance

FILM PRODUCTION INSURANCE PREMIUMS: ONE WAY TO SAVE MONEY

Posted by David Hamilton on Jun 30, 2014 5:03:00 PM

One of the simplest ways to reduce film production insurance premiums is to lower the net insurable budget. The net insurable budget is the amount left once various budget line items are removed from the definition of insurable costs. The rate that is negotiated with the insurance company is applied against the net budget.

A typical rate might be .70 cents per hundred dollars of net budget depending on the current insurance market conditionspical rate

To illustrate, let us assume a cable TV movie needs to be insured with a budget of $2,000,000. Typically, we would remove the following lines items as costs that do not need to be insured: 

  1. Story and scenerio - we will assume this amount is $50,000 (I know writers are never paid enough).
  2. Post Production costs - we will assume this amount is $200,000

Claims that happen during post production are covered; however, due to the low risk of claims in post, the insurance company does not apply rate to post costs which is why it has been removed.

$2,000,000 less script and post costs leaves a net insurable budget of $1,750,000. $1,750,000 times the negotiated rate of .70 reults in a premium of $12,250. If the net were less than $1,750,000 the premium would go down.

Other budget costs to consider removing from our sample budget might be:

  1. Producer fees ($50,000)
  2. Development ($20,000)
  3. Publicity ($5,000)
  4. Overhead ($35,000)
  5. 50% of contingency ($25,000)

Removing the above items would lower the net insurable budget by $135,000 to $1,615,000 and would result in a premium savings of $945.

Once the budgeted cost is removed from the net insurable budget it is no longer insured in the event of a claim so producers need to be sure before removing from the insured budget.

As specialized film insurance brokers, we can help guide you to an appropriate net insurable budget for your film production.

Tags: Short Film Insurance Cost, Film Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, Film Production Insurance Premiums, film insurance premium

Front Row Insurance Brokers announce merger with Globalex of Montreal

Posted by David Hamilton on Sep 23, 2013 5:31:00 PM

Canada's largest film insurance broker is created.


GlobalEx InsuranceVancouver,Canada - - September 23, 1013 -- Front Row is pleased to announce a merger with Globalex after five months of discussion.  Globalex is one of the largest specialized film insurance brokers in Quebec with 12 staff located in their Sherbrooke St office. 

The combined company is licensed and registered in every province and is the largest broker as measured by premium volume for each of the four major film insurance companies: Chubb, Premiere/Everest, Allianz/Firemans Fund and Travelers / St Paul.

"Our volume with the insurance companies gives us a competitive edge when negotiating coverage, premiums and claims settlements for our clients," says David Hamilton, President of Front Row based in Vancouver.

Front Row is an independent broker that works on behalf of producers to transfer the risks of filming to insurance companies for a premium charge. Should a claim occur, Front Row ensures that the production company receives the money that they are owed per the insurance policy.

Front Row also has offices in Toronto and Vancouver.

Tags: Entertainment Insurance, Film insurance broker, Film Production Insurance Premiums, Front Row Insurance Brokers, Canadian Insurance Broker, Canada Film Broker, film insurance underwriter, Globalex Insurance

How Can Travel Delay Insurance Protect You?

Posted by David Hamilton on Jan 4, 2013 4:12:00 PM

Travel Delay Insurance protects your film production Budget when cast do not show up on set.

Travel Delay Insurance coverage is an  Extra Expense coverage that is part of some film production insurance policies  The Fireman’s Fund Insurance Company defines Travel Delays in their insuring agreement as:

 “For reasons other than weather, we will pay for loss due to the closure of any departure airport used by your personnel or used to transport your property, when such airport closure either delays or precludes the timely arrival of personnel or property to a filming location of the Insured Production”.

EXAMPLES of extra expenses covered by the Travel Delay coverage:Travel Insurance

-There is a problem with the baggage belt within the airport delaying baggage & equipment from being loaded onto the plane.

-There is a temporary bomb scare which results in a delay in cast or crew’s flight out of their departure airport.

 As with most other coverages, there are some standard exclusions that apply to Extra Expense coverages. Please see the policy wording for a full description of the coverage, or call a specialized film insurance broker such as Front Row Insurance: david@frontrowinsurance.com.

Tags: Entertainment Insurance, Film insurance broker, Film Production Companies

Umbrella Vs. Excess Liability Insurance Coverage for Film Production

Posted by David Hamilton on Jan 2, 2013 9:33:00 AM

A typical production company will purchase liability insurance to provide coverage for claims relating to third party bodily injury and/or property damage caused by the production’s activities. As the majority of production companies will use vehicles on/off set, along with mobile equipment, watercraft and/or aircraft, they must also consider liability protection for these exposures too.

Whichever type of liability policy or policies are selected by a production company; there is a “primary” layer of coverage.  Depending upon the limit of the primary general liability coverage, a production company may wish to purchase additional limits of  protection: a filming location may require 10mil or more of coverage although 5mil is a common limit of coverage in Canada.

This additional layer of liability coverage  is called umbrella  or excess coverage.

Either Excess or Umbrella coverage is triggered when the primary protection’s limits have been breached, i.e. the underlying policy limit is exhausted.

Theoretically, an Umbrella Policy supplements it’s excess coverage to  include miscellaneous and unidentified loss exposures that are not covered by an underlying policy.  This is an advantage of an umbrella liability policy. Since there isn’t a source of primary protection for these exposures, a form of high deductible, called a self-insured retention, is applied to such losses.

An Excess Policy does NOT provide broader coverage; it only serves to supplement whatever coverage exists in the primary layer.  It’s becoming increasingly common for such coverage to be provided on a Following Form basis.  These forms are written so that they track the coverage, exclusions, and provisions of the underlying policies.

Simply stated, an Umbrella Policy will provide additional protection for your production company with different coverage that may not be in your underlying policy. An Excess Policy will further protect your production company by adding extra protection onto the limits of your underlying policy.

If you seek additional coverage for your production company, be sure to pay attention to what is stated in the form. The term umbrella may be used even when the form does not provide true umbrella coverage. For additional information relating to the above, please contact Front Row Insurance Brokers: david@frontrowinsurancebrokers.com

 

 

Tags: Film Production Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, Film insurance broker, Entertainment Insurance Broker, Film Production Insurance Premiums, Front Row Insurance Brokers, entertainment package insurance

How does Imminent Peril Insurance Coverage Protect your Production?

Posted by David Hamilton on Dec 31, 2012 12:08:00 PM

Imminent Peril is part of Extra Expense coverage. EE itself is similar to Business Interruption insurance, except that it will not cover loss of income, but rather if you suffer an insured loss it will pay for the extra costs to get your production back to filming as soon as possible.  It will also reimburse you for extra costs incurred because something out of your control has prevented you from filming.

 What does ‘Imminent Peril’ cover? :

 ‘Imminent Peril’ is defined in the policy as “We will pay for expenses you incur to avoid a loss insured under this policy due to imminent peril to the extent that such expenses serve to avoid such loss.” It will pay for the damage you cause to prevent further damage.

 EXAMPLES of losses that would be insured by Imminent Peril:1067343 62302481[1] resized 600

- A sudden  storm hits your external set with golf ball sized hail stones. To prevent damage to your filming gear, you tear down a façade from your set to cover the cameras. The cost to rebuild the intentional damage to the set would be covered by Imminent Peril.         

- A small fire ignites in your production office.  You attempt to control the fire by switching off the gas supply, breaking the alarm glass, using fire extinguishers and fire blankets, and evacuate the building to protect persons and property.  This coverage will pay for these extra materials and lost productive time used to minimize damage.

 

 NB: As with most other coverages, there are some standard exclusions that apply to Extra Expense coverages. Please see the policy wording for a full description of the coverage, or call a specialized film insurance broker such as Front Row Insurance: david@frontrowinsurance.com.

Tags: Documentary Insurance, Film Production Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, DICE Insurance, Film Insurance claims

Film Production Companies and Camera Cars: Reducing the Risk

Posted by David Hamilton on Nov 26, 2012 5:42:00 PM

The camera car should  be engineered specifically for film and television production. The insert-camera car operator has the authority to suspend operation of the vehicle if they believe the vehicle is unsafe in any way.

General Guidelines – Follow these safety requirements when working with insert-camera cars:

  • Inspect the car – including the brakes, tires, electrical system, and towing equipment – before and after each use
  • Qualified, experienced workers must rig the car
  • When using an insert-camera car at night, install two portable tail lights on the towing vehicle
  • Do not transport crew members or equipment not directly needed for the shot sequence
  • Do not ride on the tow bar or on the exterior of the towed vehicle. Crew members may ride on a towed camera platform specifically designed for this type of work, as long as they use the necessary restraints and harnesses.
  • In most cases, insert-camera cars require a police escort during operation

 

A specialized film insurance broker is best able to present the risks associated with your film production to the film insurance underwriter to ensure you receive the best coverage and premium for your production.

 

Front Row Insurance Brokers are specialized Film Insurance Brokers. Please contact us if you have any questions.

 

Tags: Film Insurance, Film Production Equipment, Film Production Insurance, Production Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, Film insurance broker, Entertainment Insurance Broker, Film Production Companies, Film Production Insurance claims, Film Insurance claims, Film Production Insurance Premiums, Specialized film insurance broker, Film Gear insurance, entertainment package insurance, Film insurance broker, film insurance underwriter

Substantial Film Insurance Savings in Vancouver compared to Los Angeles

Posted by David Hamilton on Nov 21, 2012 5:08:00 PM

It is much less expensive to  insure a film production in Vancouver as compared to Los Angeles - $30,000 less for a film budgeted at $5,000,000.. This is a substantial benefit to a producer that is considering Louisiana, New Mexico or LA vs Vancouver.

I have prepared an excel premium savings spreadsheet for you to share with US Producers to make them aware of yet another good reason to film in BC!

You can download the premium savings spreadsheet here

Please let me know if you have any questions.

I hope to see you at the Whistler Film Festival.

david@frontrowinsurance.com

   1 604 684 3456

 

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Tags: Commercial Production Insurance, Film Insurance, Film Production, Film Production Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, Film insurance broker, Entertainment Insurance Broker, Annual Film Insurance, Film Production Companies, Film Insurance claims, Film Production Insurance Premiums, Film Producers, Front Row Insurance Brokers, Film production offices, Canadian Insurance

Risk Assessments for Film Productions

Posted by David Hamilton on Nov 20, 2012 1:44:00 PM

Most workplace injuries and diseases can be prevented by identifying and dealing with potential workplace hazards and unsafe work practices.

 

Q. When do you need to conduct a risk assessment?

 

A.  For each potentially hazardous activity or situation involved in your production. Ie.

  • Stunts
  • Special Effects
  • Water work
  • Helicopters, Fixed-wing aircraft, and gliders
  • Exotic or domestic animals and reptiles
  • Potentially hazardous location

 

Conducting Risk Assessments – 3 basic steps

 

  1. Identify potential hazards and unsafe work practices
  2. Assess the risks associated with the potential hazards or unsafe work practices
  3. Deal with the potential hazards or unsafe work practices

Remember: Write your risk assessments on paper, that way they can be attached to call sheets and used as a reference in case they are needed at a later date.

A specialized film insurance broker is best able to present the risks associated with your film production to the film insurance underwriter to ensure you receive the best coverage and premium for your production.

Front Row Insurance Brokers are specialized Film Insurance Brokers. Please call us if you have any questions.

The above information is  based on WorkSafe – Focus on Safety – Safe Work Practices for Film and Television Production in B.C. (2001 edition)

Tags: Film Insurance, Film Production, Film Production Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, Film insurance broker, Entertainment Insurance Broker, Film Production Companies, Film Production Insurance claims, Film Producers, Specialized film insurance broker, Cast Insurance, Short Film Insurance, Short Film Production Insurance, Risk Assesment

Film Production Companies and Lighting Safety

Posted by David Hamilton on Nov 19, 2012 11:05:00 AM

Lighting – Set up  Film Set Lighting Safely

 

  • Use appropriate fall protection equipment when setting up lighting
  • Ensure that all lighting fixtures are supported so that they will not fall ie. Use safety wire or chain to suspend fixtures
  • Ensure that all lighting stands are property weighted with sandbags
  • Cover arc-type lamps such as HMIs in wet weather to prevent rain from entering the unit and ballast
  • When using open-faced lighting units, provide protection from shrapnel in case the bulb explodes
  • Ensure that scaffolds or other metal grids that are used to support the lighting are grounded
  • Before using any grounded equipment, test for continuity between the ground pin on the plug and the metal parts of the lighting equipment
  • Before relamping or repairing a light, turn it off and disconnect it from the power source.

 

A specialized film insurance broker is best able to present the risks associated with your film production to the film insurance underwriter to ensure you receive the best coverage and premium for your production.

Front Row Insurance Brokers are specialized Film Insurance Brokers. Please call us if you have any questions.

The above information is  based on WorkSafe – Focus on Safety – Safe Work Practices for Film and Television Production in B.C. (2001 edition)

Tags: Film Production Insurance, Film equipment insurance, Short Film Production Insurance, Film Gear insurance, Film Insurance, Production Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, Film insurance broker, Entertainment Insurance Broker, Film Production Insurance claims, Specialized film insurance broker, Film Insurance claims, Canada Film Broker, Film Production Equipment, Film production equipment insurance

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