How can Ingress & Egress Coverage protect your Film Production?

Posted by David Hamilton on Jan 3, 2013 9:44:00 AM

At first read, Ingress & Egress may sound like a type of leakage.  In the case of this Extra Expense (EE) sub-coverage though, it actually refers to circumstances which may arise where persons or property are unable to either gain access (ingress) or leave (egress) a building/location in order to continue work as required.  This coverage is similar in nature to the Civil & Military Authority EE sub-coverage, with the exception that the inability to access or leave the building/location in question is not decided by the authorities.

 As with other Extra Expense coverages, the sub-limit (sum insured) attributed to the sub-coverages is the maximum amount given for that sub-coverage, and all Extra Expense claims cannot exceed the policy Extra Expense maximum limit.

 The Fireman’s Fund Insurance Company (Allianz) defines Ingress/Egress in their insuring agreement as:

 “We will pay for loss due to your inability to access or leave a facility within your care, custody and control due to the closure, by other than a civil authority, of that facility’s access road, meaning a road that affords access into and out of that area within your care, custody and control, which is necessary to be used in connection with an Insured Production to which this Coverage applies.”

 EXAMPLES of losses/delay expenses covered by this Ingress & Egress coverage:732172 48635269[1] resized 600

-Road access to the studio the Insured company is renting is blocked because a sinkhole  has collapsed in the road.

-Your film director is unable to leave his hotel on time because the street in front of the hotel has large fallen trees on it due to a windstorm the previous night.

 NB: As with most other coverages, there are some standard exclusions that apply to Extra Expense coverages. Please see the policy wording for a full description of the coverage, or call a specialized film insurance broker such as Front Row Insurance.

Need help? contact david@frontrowinsurance.com.

 

Tags: Film insurance broker, Film Production Insurance Premiums, entertainment package insurance, Specialized film insurance broker

Umbrella Vs. Excess Liability Insurance Coverage for Film Production

Posted by David Hamilton on Jan 2, 2013 9:33:00 AM

A typical production company will purchase liability insurance to provide coverage for claims relating to third party bodily injury and/or property damage caused by the production’s activities. As the majority of production companies will use vehicles on/off set, along with mobile equipment, watercraft and/or aircraft, they must also consider liability protection for these exposures too.

Whichever type of liability policy or policies are selected by a production company; there is a “primary” layer of coverage.  Depending upon the limit of the primary general liability coverage, a production company may wish to purchase additional limits of  protection: a filming location may require 10mil or more of coverage although 5mil is a common limit of coverage in Canada.

This additional layer of liability coverage  is called umbrella  or excess coverage.

Either Excess or Umbrella coverage is triggered when the primary protection’s limits have been breached, i.e. the underlying policy limit is exhausted.

Theoretically, an Umbrella Policy supplements it’s excess coverage to  include miscellaneous and unidentified loss exposures that are not covered by an underlying policy.  This is an advantage of an umbrella liability policy. Since there isn’t a source of primary protection for these exposures, a form of high deductible, called a self-insured retention, is applied to such losses.

An Excess Policy does NOT provide broader coverage; it only serves to supplement whatever coverage exists in the primary layer.  It’s becoming increasingly common for such coverage to be provided on a Following Form basis.  These forms are written so that they track the coverage, exclusions, and provisions of the underlying policies.

Simply stated, an Umbrella Policy will provide additional protection for your production company with different coverage that may not be in your underlying policy. An Excess Policy will further protect your production company by adding extra protection onto the limits of your underlying policy.

If you seek additional coverage for your production company, be sure to pay attention to what is stated in the form. The term umbrella may be used even when the form does not provide true umbrella coverage. For additional information relating to the above, please contact Front Row Insurance Brokers: david@frontrowinsurancebrokers.com

 

 

Tags: Film Production Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, Film insurance broker, Entertainment Insurance Broker, Film Production Insurance Premiums, Front Row Insurance Brokers, entertainment package insurance

Film Production Companies & Pyrotechnics: Film Insurance Best Practices

Posted by David Hamilton on Dec 4, 2012 2:42:00 PM

If you plan to use pyrotechnics during your film production, determine the potential hazards and conduct a risk assessment for each potential hazard to minimize your film insurance costs.

Avoid the following common pyrotechnic mistakes:

1.            Triggering the pyrotechnic effect prematurelyPyrotechnics

2.            Using more pyrotechnic material than necessary

3.            Not having fire extinguishers of a suitable type and capacity available

4.            Assigning duties to inadequately trained or inexperienced pyro technicians or assistants

5.            Entering danger areas before the special effects coordinator has inspected them and the all-clear signal has sounded.

Work safely to achieve realism: When planning stunts and special effects, always look for the safest way to execute the scene. Consider using scale models and computer simulations as replacements for live stunts and pyrotechnics.

Inform the Cast and Crew:

On call sheets, include safety information related to pyrotechnic special effects and make sure to inform your film insurance broker so that they can advise the film insurance underwriter. Specify restricted or no-access areas as well as viewing locations, if they are available.

Conduct a safety talk and dry run before filming a pyrotechnic special effect. If you make changes to scheduled pyrotechnics, hold another talk to explain the changes and any revised safety precautions.

 

A specialized film insurance broker is best able to present the risks associated with your film production to the film insurance underwriter to ensure that you receive the best coverage and premium for your production.

Front Row Insurance Brokers are specialized Film Insurance Brokers. Please contact us if you have any questions.

 

 

Tags: Film Production Insurance, Film insurance broker, Entertainment Insurance Broker, Special Effects Insurance, Specialized film insurance broker, Front Row Insurance Brokers, entertainment package insurance, Specialized film insurance broker

Film Production Companies and Camera Cars: Reducing the Risk

Posted by David Hamilton on Nov 26, 2012 5:42:00 PM

The camera car should  be engineered specifically for film and television production. The insert-camera car operator has the authority to suspend operation of the vehicle if they believe the vehicle is unsafe in any way.

General Guidelines – Follow these safety requirements when working with insert-camera cars:

  • Inspect the car – including the brakes, tires, electrical system, and towing equipment – before and after each use
  • Qualified, experienced workers must rig the car
  • When using an insert-camera car at night, install two portable tail lights on the towing vehicle
  • Do not transport crew members or equipment not directly needed for the shot sequence
  • Do not ride on the tow bar or on the exterior of the towed vehicle. Crew members may ride on a towed camera platform specifically designed for this type of work, as long as they use the necessary restraints and harnesses.
  • In most cases, insert-camera cars require a police escort during operation

 

A specialized film insurance broker is best able to present the risks associated with your film production to the film insurance underwriter to ensure you receive the best coverage and premium for your production.

 

Front Row Insurance Brokers are specialized Film Insurance Brokers. Please contact us if you have any questions.

 

Tags: Film Insurance, Film Production Equipment, Film Production Insurance, Production Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, Film insurance broker, Entertainment Insurance Broker, Film Production Companies, Film Production Insurance claims, Film Insurance claims, Film Production Insurance Premiums, Specialized film insurance broker, Film Gear insurance, entertainment package insurance, Film insurance broker, film insurance underwriter

Film and HD Production Companies and Watercraft Use

Posted by David Hamilton on Nov 22, 2012 4:32:00 PM

Use Boats safely to protect your cast and crew during your film production. The following suggestions will result in the best film insurance premium with the deductible:  

  1. Follow all boating regulations

  2. Ensure that the operator knows how to operate the boat competently and safely

  3. Make sure that the boat is seaworthy and that all machinery and equipment on board meets WCB requirements

  4. Know the boat’s load capacity, do not overload the boat

  5. Allow only essential cast and crew members on the boat. All others should remain on land.

  6. Do not smoke on board. Fire at sea is a serious potential hazard.

On the Boat

  1. Put equipment and tools in their place and use straps to secure tripods and other filming gear.

  2. Secure hatch covers so they will not slide or shift

  3. Keep passageways clear and do not block emergency exits

  4. Keep the deck clear of potential slipping and tripping hazards

Boats that are tied to the dock during filming and are not on the water under their own power will be covered under props/sets/wardrobes coverage on the entertainment package insurance policy. Talk to your film insurance broker if the boat is under power.  

Have emergency backups in place so you will be ready if anything goes wrong during filming.  

Emergency backups include:  

  1. A reliable communication system 

  2. Safety lines, nets, observers, or divers for filming in rivers or other bodies of water where potentially hazardous conditions exist (for example, swift currents, thick underwater plant life, or rocks) 

  3. Stationing emergency rescue workers downstream of having a safety boat nearby  

  4. A specialized film insurance broker is best able to present the risks associated with your film production to the film insurance underwriter to ensure that you receive the best coverage and premium for your production.   

Front Row Insurance Brokers are specialized Film Insurance Brokers. Please contact us if you have any questions.

Tags: Front Row Insurance Brokers, Film and HD Production Companies, film insurance premium, lowest film insurance coverage, entertainment package insurance, Film insurance broker, Specialized film insurance broker, film insurance underwriter

Recent Posts

Posts by Topic

see all