Effortless and Affordable Short-Term Film Insurance Canada

Posted by David Hamilton on May 27, 2016 3:49:23 PM

Short film insurance Canada


Short film insurance (Canada) can be arranged quickly through Front Row. Front Row's online short shoot program is quite popular with new and established filmmakers because of the low cost and the simple process to arrange a policy.

Note: the online program is for individuals who live or have a company in Canada at this time; however, worldwide coverage is available to Canadian filmmakers. For a US short film insurance quote, complete this form.

To provide you with a short film insurance quote, we need a few details. The fastest way to receive a quote is to complete this short application telling us about your project:

Get a 2 Minute Quote

We can provide Short-Term Equipment Insurance starting at $300 CAD!

If you would like to add film location liability for one week , we can do so for a small additional premium.

Front Row Insurance can also provide affordable coverage for: 

If you would like an annual policy to cover multiple productions, please visit our D.I.C.E Page (Documentaries, Industrial Films, Commercials, Educational Films – it also covers short shoots, music videos and feature films with lower budgets).

Topics: Short Film Insurance, Film Insurance, Film insurance broker, Insurance for film set, Film school insurance

Obtaining Insurance for your Short Film | Short Film Insurance Canada

Posted by David Hamilton on Dec 30, 2013 3:59:00 PM

Insuring your short film is a fast, easy process WITH Front Row


Our 
Short-Term Production Insurance program can include the following coverage for up to 15-days: (note that the online program is for Canadian-based producers only; complete this form for a US short-term film insurance quote)

  • Insure up to $50,000 of rented equipment for as low as $165
  • Insure $100,000 of rented equipment for as low as $201
  • Insure $250,000 of rented equipment for as low as $368
  • Covers budgets up to $250,000
  • Short-Term Rented Equipment Limits up to $1,000,000
  • Short-Term Commercial General Liability Limits up to $5,000,000 (Includes Employers Liability & Non-owned Auto Liability)
  • Short-Term Third Party Property Damage Limits up to $2,000,000
  • $1,000,000 of Commercial General Liability begins at $465
  • $5,000,000 of Commercial General Liability begins at $915
  • Note: Premiums may vary depending on production locations.

Get Your Online Quote Now

The locations that you film at will usually want to see proof of your location liability insurance before the property owner will give you access to film. Liability insurance will repair any property damage that your crew causes at a location. This insurance will provide you with a lawyer if you are sued.

The equipment coverage will pay to repair or replace lighting, cameras and other gear that you damage. The equipment will be covered anywhere in Canada or the USA. You will be covered even if your gear is lost or stolen while travelling.

Important questions to answer for a short film insurance quote:

  • Who is the named insured? This can you personally or your company if you have one.

  • What is your address and email?

  • What is the approximate value of the gear that you are renting?

  • How many minutes will your finished project be?

  • How many days will you be filming?

  • Where will you be filming?

  • What is the budget of your shoot?

  • Will there be any stunts or special effects?

We can also provide you with a year of coverage if you have multiple projects and we can cover your larger projects such as a feature or a series.
Click here to get covered now! ▸

RELATED LINKS:

Film Insurance 101 & How to Protect Your Film Project

Film Production Insurance: Why it is needed

Pre-Production Insurance

Film Production Insurance

How the Premium is Determined

Short Film Insurance

DigiGear Insurance

Props/Sets/Wardrobe Insurance

E&O Insurance

DICE Insurance

Third Party Property Damage

Crew Vehicles

Umbrella Vs. Excess Liability

Commercial General Liability

Negative Film / Videotape and Faulty Stock

Workers Comp

Cast Insurance

Extra Expense (EE)

Foreign Locations

Claims

Topics: Film equipment insurance, Short Film Insurance, Film Insurance, Film school insurance

Film Production Companies & Pyrotechnics: Who can work with Pyro?

Posted by David Hamilton on Jan 2, 2013 1:41:00 PM

FILM PRODUCTION COMPANIES & PYROTECHNICS

des éléments pyrotechniques

Only trained and certified workers can plan, rig, and detonate pyrotechnic special effects on a film production. Uncertified SPFX workers could invalidate your film production insurance.

The Explosives Regulatory Division of Natural Resources Canada issues:

four classes of pyrotechnic special effects certification:

1.            Theatrical User

2.            Assistant

3.            Pyro technician or special effects pyro technician

4.            Authority having jurisdiction (ie. A fire chief or fire protection officer)

For additional information about pyrotechnic special effects certification, contact the Explosives Regulatory Division of Natural Resources Canada.

Who is in charge of pyrotechnics?

The special effects coordinator for a production has final authority on all safety matters related to pyrotechnics used in that production. The special effects coordinator must remain on set at all times during the preparation, placement, testing and firing of any pyrotechnic special effect.

Follow all laws and requirements before using pyrotechnic special effects and get all the required licenses and permits.

Use, handle, store and transport pyrotechnic materials in accordance with all applicable federal, provincial and municipal laws such as the Canada Explosives Act, the Transportation of Dangerous Good Act, and the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation.

specialized film insurance broker is best able to present the risks associated with your film production to the film insurance underwriter to ensure you receive the best coverage and premium for your production.

Front Row Insurance Brokers are specialized Film Insurance Brokers. Please call us if you have any questions.

The above information is  based on WorkSafe – Focus on Safety – Safe Work Practices for Film and Television Production in B.C. (2001 edition)

RELATED:

FILM PRODUCTION COMPANIES & PYROTECHNICS: FILM INSURANCE BEST PRACTICES

Topics: Film Insurance, Stunt Insurance, SPFX Insurance, Pyrotechnics

Umbrella Vs. Excess Liability Insurance Coverage for Film Production

Posted by David Hamilton on Jan 2, 2013 9:33:00 AM

Umbrella Vs. Excess Liability Insurance

A typical production company will purchase liability insurance to provide coverage for claims relating to third party bodily injury and/or property damage caused by the production’s activities. As the majority of production companies will use vehicles on/off set, along with mobile equipment, watercraft and/or aircraft, they must also consider liability protection for these exposures too.


Whichever type of liability policy or policies are selected by a production company; there is a “primary” layer of coverage.  Depending upon the limit of the primary general liability coverage, a production company may wish to purchase additional limits of protection: a filming location may require 10mil or more of coverage although 5mil is a common limit of coverage in Canada.

This additional layer of liability coverage is called umbrella or excess coverage.

Either Excess or Umbrella coverage is triggered when the primary protection’s limits have been breached, i.e., the underlying policy limit is exhausted.

Theoretically, an Umbrella Policy supplements its excess coverage to include miscellaneous and unidentified loss exposures that are not covered by an underlying policy. This is an advantage of an umbrella liability policy. Since there isn’t a source of primary protection for these exposures, a form of high deductible, called a self-insured retention, is applied to such losses.

An Excess Policy does NOT provide broader coverage; it only serves to supplement whatever coverage exists in the primary layer.  It’s becoming increasingly common for such coverage to be provided on a Following Form basis.  These forms are written so that they track the coverage, exclusions, and provisions of the underlying policies.

Simply stated, an Umbrella Policy will provide additional protection for your production company with different coverage that may not be in your underlying policy. An Excess Policy will further protect your production company by adding extra protection onto the limits of your underlying policy.

If you seek additional coverage for your production company, be sure to pay attention to what is stated in the form. The term "umbrella" may be used even when the form does not provide true umbrella coverage. For additional information relating to the above, please contact Front Row Insurance Brokers.

RELATED LINKS:

Film Insurance 101 & How to Protect Your Film Project

Film Production Insurance: Why it is needed

Pre-Production Insurance

Film Production Insurance

How the Premium is Determined

Short Film Insurance

DigiGear Insurance

Props/Sets/Wardrobe Insurance

E&O Insurance

DICE Insurance

Third Party Property Damage

Crew Vehicles

Umbrella Vs. Excess Liability

Commercial General Liability

Negative Film / Videotape and Faulty Stock

Workers Comp

Cast Insurance

Extra Expense (EE)

Foreign Locations

Claims

Topics: Film Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, Film insurance broker, Film insurance premium

How does Imminent Peril Insurance Coverage Protect your Production?

Posted by David Hamilton on Dec 31, 2012 12:08:00 PM

Imminent Peril insurance coverage

Imminent Peril is part of Extra Expense (EE) coverage. EE itself is similar to Business Interruption insurance, except that it will not cover loss of income, but rather if you suffer an insured loss, it will pay for the extra costs to get your production back to filming as soon as possible. It will also reimburse you for extra costs incurred because something out of your control has prevented you from filming.

‘Imminent Peril’ is defined in the policy as “We will pay for expenses you incur to avoid a loss insured under this policy due to imminent peril to the extent that such expenses serve to avoid such loss.” It will pay for the damage you cause to prevent further damage.

EXAMPLES of losses that would be insured by Imminent Peril:Imminent Peril coverage

- A sudden  storm hits your external set with golf ball sized hail stones. To prevent damage to your filming gear, you tear down a façade from your set to cover the cameras. The cost to rebuild the intentional damage to the set would be covered by Imminent Peril.         

- A small fire ignites in your production office.  You attempt to control the fire by switching off the gas supply, breaking the alarm glass, using fire extinguishers and fire blankets, and evacuate the building to protect persons and property.  This coverage will pay for these extra materials and lost productive time used to minimize damage.

NB: As with most other coverages, there are some standard exclusions that apply to Extra Expense coverages. Please see the policy wording for a full description of the coverage, or call a specialized film insurance broker such as Front Row Insurance.

Topics: Film Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, Film Insurance claims, Documentary Insurance, DICE Insurance

Film Production Insurance & Mechanical Devices on Set

Posted by David Hamilton on Dec 10, 2012 9:42:00 AM

MECHANICAL DEVICE SAFETY ON FILM SETS

Mechanical device film setImage source: Shutterstock

If a mechanical device or an articulated set is used in a production, the film insurance cost can be minimized if the production company ensures that:

  1. The device or set is capable of safely performing the functions for which it is used
  2. Workers operate the device or set in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions, safe work practices, and the requirements of the regulation
  3. The device or set is properly inspected, tested or maintained

If a production company requires that a mechanical device or articulated set be created for a production, the production company is considered the supplier of that device or set. As a supplier, the production company must provide directions for the safe use of the device or set and must ensure that the device or set is safe when used as specified. Such directions could be developed in consultation with a qualified person such as a professional engineer.

A specialized film insurance broker is best able to present the risks associated with your film production to the film insurance underwriter to ensure you receive the best coverage and premium for your production.

Front Row Insurance Brokers are specialized Film Insurance Brokers. Please call us if you have any questions.

The above information is  based on WorkSafe – Focus on Safety – Safe Work Practices for Film and Television Production in B.C. (2001 edition)

Topics: Film equipment insurance, Film Insurance, Film insurance broker, Film Insurance claims, Film insurance premium

Film Production Insurance: Smoke and Fog Safety on The Film Set

Posted by David Hamilton on Dec 7, 2012 4:52:00 PM

SMOKE AND FOG SAFETY ON THE FILM SET

smoke on film set

To keep your film insurance premiums to a minimum utilize best practices when using fog and smoke effects on set.

The following substances are typically used to create smoke or fog:

  1. Propylene glycol, dipropylene glycol, butylene glycol, and polyethylene glycol
  2. Glycerin products
  3. Highly refined mineral oils
  4. Cryogenic gases such as carbon dioxide or liquid nitrogen

The choice of substance depends on whether it will be used indoors or outdoors, and whether the cast or crew will be exposed to it for significant period of time.

Film Production Insurance and Smoke Fog SafetyEnsure that you follow the manufacturer’s guidelines when using any of these substances. You should not alter the mix. Never heat substances above the temperatures specified in the guidelines.

Use the minimum chemical concentration for the minimum time necessary to achieve the desired fog or smoke effect. Check the regulation to see if the substance you are using has an exposure limit. Do not exceed exposure limits or reduce the oxygen concentration in the air below the normal level.

If necessary, have an occupational hygienist assess ways to reduce exposure and confirm that the oxygen concentration in the air is sufficient.

specialized film insurance broker is best able to present the risks associated with your film production to the film insurance underwriter to ensure you receive the best coverage and premium for your production.

Front Row Insurance Brokers are specialized Film Insurance Brokers. Please call us if you have any questions.

The above information is  based on WorkSafe – Focus on Safety – Safe Work Practices for Film and Television Production in B.C. (2001 edition)

Topics: Film Insurance, Film insurance broker, Film Insurance claims, Stunt Insurance, Film insurance premium, Film Production Companies

Film Production Companies & Pyrotechnics: Film Insurance Best Practices

Posted by David Hamilton on Dec 4, 2012 2:42:00 PM

Pyrotechnics & Film insurance

If you plan to use pyrotechnics during your film production, determine the potential hazards and conduct a risk assessment for each potential hazard to minimize your film insurance costs.

Avoid the following common pyrotechnic mistakes:

  1. Triggering the pyrotechnic effect prematurelyFilm reel projector
  2. Using more pyrotechnic material than necessary
  3. Not having fire extinguishers of a suitable type and capacity available
  4. Assigning duties to inadequately trained or inexperienced pyro technicians or assistants
  5. Entering danger areas before the special effects coordinator has inspected them and the all-clear signal has sounded

Work safely to achieve realism: When planning stunts and special effects, always look for the safest way to execute the scene. Consider using scale models and computer simulations as replacements for live stunts and pyrotechnics.

Inform the Cast and Crew:

On call sheets, include safety information related to pyrotechnic special effects and make sure to inform your film insurance broker so that they can advise the film insurance underwriter. Specify restricted or no-access areas as well as viewing locations, if they are available.

Conduct a safety talk and dry run before filming a pyrotechnic special effect. If you make changes to scheduled pyrotechnics, hold another talk to explain the changes and any revised safety precautions.

A specialized film insurance broker is best able to present the risks associated with your film production to the film insurance underwriter to ensure that you receive the best coverage and premium for your production.

Front Row Insurance Brokers are specialized Film Insurance Brokers. Please contact us if you have any questions.

RELATED:

Who can use pyrotechnics?

Topics: Film Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, Film insurance broker, SPFX Insurance, Pyrotechnics

Film Production Companies and Camera Cars: Reducing the Risk

Posted by David Hamilton on Nov 26, 2012 5:42:00 PM

The Camera Car in Filmmaking

Camera car

The camera car should be engineered specifically for film and television production. The insert-camera car operator has the authority to suspend operation of the vehicle if they believe the vehicle is unsafe in any way.

Safety requirements when working with insert-camera cars:

  • Inspect the car – including the brakes, tires, electrical system and towing equipment – before and after each use
  • Qualified, experienced workers must rig the car
  • When using an insert-camera car at night, install two portable tail lights [Amazon Affiliate Link] on the towing vehicle
  • Do not transport crew members or equipment that are not directly needed for the shot sequence
  • Do not ride on the tow bar or on the exterior of the towed vehicle. Crew members may ride on a towed camera platform specifically designed for this type of work, as long as they use the necessary restraints and harnesses
  • In most cases, insert-camera cars require a police escort during operation 

A specialized film insurance broker is best able to present the risks associated with your film production to the film insurance underwriter to ensure you receive the best coverage and premium for your production.

Front Row Insurance Brokers are specialized film insurance brokers. Please contact us if you have any questions.

Related Posts:

I AM RENTING A CAR (IN CANADA) FOR MY PRODUCTION – WHAT DO I NEED
AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE FOR FILMS
RENTING CREW PERSONAL VEHICLES

Amazon Associates Disclosure: Front Row Insurance is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. This post may contain affiliate links. There is no additional cost to you.

Topics: Film equipment insurance, Film Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, Film insurance broker, Film Insurance claims, Film insurance premium, Film Production Companies

Film Production Companies and Watercraft Use | Filming on Water, Boats

Posted by David Hamilton on Nov 22, 2012 4:32:00 PM

Filming on boat

Film Set Guidelines - watercraft use

Use boats safely to protect your cast and crew during your film production. The following suggestions will result in the best film insurance premium with the deductible:  

  1. Follow all boating regulations

  2. Ensure that the operator knows how to operate the boat competently and safely

  3. Make sure that the boat is seaworthy

  4. Know the boat’s load capacity, do not overload the boat

  5. Allow only essential cast and crew members on the boat (all others should remain on land)

  6. Do not smoke on board. Fire at sea is a serious potential hazard

On the Boat - Guidelines

  1. Put equipment and tools in their place and use straps to secure tripods and other filming gear

  2. Secure hatch covers so they will not slide or shift

  3. Keep passageways clear and do not block emergency exits

  4. Keep the deck clear of potential slipping and tripping hazards

Boats that are tied to the dock during filming and are not on the water under their own power will be covered under props/sets/wardrobes coverage on the entertainment package insurance policy. Talk to your film insurance broker if the boat is under power.  

Have backups in place so you will be ready if anything goes wrong during filming.  

Emergency Backups re: Watercraft

  1. A reliable communication system

  2. Safety lines, nets, observers, or divers for filming in rivers or other bodies of water where potentially hazardous conditions exist (e.g., swift currents, thick underwater plant life, or rocks)

  3. Stationing emergency rescue workers downstream of having a safety boat nearby

  4. A specialized film insurance broker is best able to present the risks associated with your film production to the film insurance underwriter to ensure that you receive the best coverage and premium for your production

Front Row Insurance Brokers are specialized Film Insurance Brokers. Please contact us if you have any questions.

Related Post:

FILM PRODUCTION INSURANCE AND WATERCRAFT: DON'T HIT A ROCK

Topics: Film Insurance, Film insurance broker, Film insurance premium, Film Production Companies