Earthquakes and Film Production: What to do After the Earth Moves

Posted by David Hamilton on Oct 30, 2012 10:59:00 AM

 

  • Stay calm and help others if you’re able to.
  • Listen to radio, or check the internet for information from authorities.
  • Check your production office and studio set for structural damage and other hazards. If you suspect anything is unsafe, do not re-enter.
  • Unplug appliances and broken lights to prevent fires when the power is restored.
  • Do not light matches or turn on light switches until you are sure that there are no gas leaks or flammable liquids spilled.

 

Tags: Film Insurance, Film Production Equipment, Film Production Insurance, Production Insurance, Film insurance broker, Film Production Insurance claims, Specialized film insurance broker, Film equipment insurance, Film Gear insurance, Film production offices, Film equipment insurance, Film production equipment insurance, Film Gear insurance

Film Production Insurance and the Re-use of Hard Drives

Posted by David Hamilton on Oct 29, 2012 12:51:00 PM

Film Productions re-use hard drives all the time and this is OK provided they are duplicating and sending one copy to the post facility. The post facility is then supposed to copy onto an editing suite hard drive and then check the footage. If the footage is OK the producer usually deletes the camera hard drive and reuses.

Most film productions follow this protocol; however, if the production company is  erasing the hard drive before a positive post report is received from the post production facility they could be risking their footage.

Using  re-used drives shouldn't be a problem provided duplicates of the footage are being made.

If the work flow is different from the above we recommend asking your film insurance broker to confirm that the coverage is in force.

Tags: Film Insurance, Production Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, Film insurance broker, Entertainment Insurance Broker, Film Production Insurance claims, Film Production Insurance Premiums, Specialized film insurance broker

Earthquakes and Film Production: What to do when the Earth Moves

Posted by David Hamilton on Oct 26, 2012 10:44:00 AM

If you are indoors on a film production set or in a film production office, DROP,  COVER AND HOLD ON: 

 

  • Drop under heavy furniture such as a table, desk, or any solid furniture.
  • Cover your head and torso to prevent being hit by falling objects.
  • Hold on to the object that you are under so that you remain covered.

 

If you are outdoors on a film location:

 

  • Stay outside.
  • Go to an open area away from buildings. The most dangerous place is
    near exterior walls.
  • If you’re in a crowded area, take cover where you won’t be trampled.

 

If you are in a production vehicle or in a picture vehicle: 

 

  • Pull over to a safe place where you are not blocking the road.
  • Avoid bridges, overpasses, underpasses, buildings or any structure that could collapse.
  • Stop the vehicle and stay inside.
  • Listen to your car vehicle for instructions from emergency officials.
  • If power lines are down, do not attempt to get out of the car.

 

Avoid the following in an earthquake: 

 

  • Doorways, which can slam shut and cause injuries.
  • Windows, bookcases, tall furniture and light fixtures, which can shatter or lead to other injuries.
  • Elevators: get out as soon as you can.
  • If you’re near a coastline in a high risk area during a strong earthquake, immediately move inland or to higher ground until officials declare the area is safe.

 

 Front Row is experienced with insuring Film Productions against earthquakes: ask us how.

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Earthquakes and Film Production: Know the Risks and be Prepared

Posted by David Hamilton on Oct 22, 2012 6:38:00 PM

What would happen to your film production if your production office and set if they were shaken by a violent earthquake?

There are various measures you can undertake to minimize damage so that you can continue to film as soon as possible:

 

  • Staff and crew should be shown how to turn off the water and electricity in the office and on set, with on/off positions clearly labeled.
  • Water heaters should be secured to wall studs or masonry: ask your landlord to do thi.
  • Secure all major appliances/electronics to walls, including expensive or fragile items that if damaged, would be a significant loss.
  • Secure top-heavy set furniture to walls with heavier items kept on lower shelves.
  • Put anti skid pads under tv’s, computers, and other related camera equipment
  • Keep flammable items and other chemicals used on set away from heat and where they are less likely to spill.
  • For mobile trailers on set, leave the wheels on or use a structural bracing system that can reduce the chance of the unit falling off it’s support.
  • Ensure that sufficient emergency kits are located around the office/on set, and designated staff and crew know where to access them.

               

Discuss earthquake coverage with your film insurance broker to ensure that your production will have the financial ability to recover losses after an earthquake. Ask your broker is your Film Production insurance included coverage for earthquake.

Front Row is experienced with insuring Film Productions against earthquakes: ask us how.

Tags: Commercial Production Insurance, Documentary Insurance, Film Production Equipment, Film Production Insurance, Entertainment Insurance Broker, Film Production Insurance claims, Film equipment insurance, Front Row Insurance Brokers, Film production offices, Film equipment insurance, Film production equipment insurance, Canadian Insurance Broker, Canada Film Broker

Film Production Insurance and Renting Crew Personal Vehicles

Posted by David Hamilton on Oct 18, 2012 5:29:00 PM

If you plan to rent a vehicle from a crew member for your film production there are some important steps to follow to ensure everyone is covered.

With respect to damage to the vehicle or third parties during shooting, there are two things to think about which are handled differently by insurance: damage to the vehicle itself; and damage to third party's property (Property Damage) or third parties themselves (Bodily Injury).

 

Scenario 1:   Damage to the vehicle only

If Production rents a vehicle from a rental car company, purchases the optional insurance, and adds all potential operators as drivers, then physical damage to the vehicle would be covered by the rental car

policy.  This would likely be your best bet as you can obtain coverage with no or small deductibles.  As well, any accidents will not be charged against the driver's insurance, so they will maintain a clean driving record.

The production policy would also be in effect if, when using the driver's own vehicle, you had a deal memo with the driver stating that production was renting the vehicle.  However, the deal memo with the driver would also have to state that they are an employee of production for coverage to be in effect.  As well, the deductible under the Commercial Vehicle Physical Damage policy is 10% of loss, $2,500 minimum, $7,500 maximum.  As you're looking at a minimum deductible of $2,500 under this coverage, it might be more worthwhile to rent the vehicle for the driver.

If the driver is operating their own vehicle, and you have no deal memo in place, you will not have any coverage for damage to their vehicle under your policy.  Damage to their vehicle would have to be paid for by their own insurance policy (if they have physical damage insurance with ICBC or another insurer), or by themselves if they have no policy.  I understand that production could always reimburse a driver for a incident, and this is obviously always a business decision you can make. Strictly speaking however, in this scenario, the owner/driver is on their own.  If production does decide to reimburse a driver for damage to their vehicle, you should have a release signed whereby the driver/owner agrees to hold the Production harmless from any further claim.  Otherwise, the driver could collect money from production, then claim from ICBC, and still come after production for compensation.

 

Scenario 2:  Third party bodily injury or property damage

If the driver is operating their own vehicle, any third party damage or injury will first be addressed by the driver/owner's insurance through ICBC. 

Either way, ICBC will be responding first to any injuries or property damage suffered by a third party.

However, in B.C., injured parties have the right to sue responsible parties.  There is a possibility that, in the event of injury or death suffered by a third party, the Production or Parent would find themselves the target of a lawsuit.  The Production has a Non-Owned Automobile Liability through their Commercial General (and Umbrella Liability policy if applicable) which will respond, subject to the terms and conditions of the policy, if the Production is found liable for any bodily injury or property damage suffered by a third party. One note: in order for coverage to apply, the vehicle involved in the accident has to have been used on production, and cannot be owned by the Production or parent Company.

So, in the event of third party bodily injury or property damage, the first response will always be by ICBC. In the event of a lawsuit against the Production, your policy will respond (again, subject to the terms and conditions of the policy) whether you have a deal memo in place with the driver or not.

Lastly, there is the potential issue of loss of  the owners safe driving credits. You should address this in the deal memo. 

 

Tags: Entertainment Insurance, Entertainment Insurance Broker, Canada Film Broker

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