I am renting a car (in Canada) for my production – what do I need?

Posted by Diane Konecny on Feb 20, 2020 9:03:02 AM

I am renting a car (in canada) for my production – what do I need?

Car in film production

Some of the most common questions we get from clients are about vehicles:

  • What coverage do I need? 
  • Do I need to buy anything from the rental company?
  • Can a 20-year-old production assistant (PA) drive the car(s)?

Well, here is what you need to know about renting vehicles when shooting a production in Canada. We will break it down into two sections to explain the basics.

1. DAMAGE to a car you are renting or are contractually required to provide coverage for while being used on production: 

The production policies we provide include coverage if you damage a vehicle while contracted by production. With most insurers, it is called Commercial Vehicle Physical Damage (CVPD)The coverage will have a limit per vehicle, so make sure that if you are renting expensive cars, your limit is high enough to cover any damage that can occur. You will also have to check the Aggregate, which is the most the policy will pay for any one occurrence (in case you damage multiple cars in one accident) and your deductible (the amount you need to pay for the damage before the insurance kicks in). Most policies will set the deductible as a percentage of the damage; for example, 10% with a minimum and maximum amount.

Your rental company will offer you a Collision or Loss Damage Waiver (CDW/ LDW) when renting a vehicle. Typically, these are about $20-$30 per vehicle/day. The CDW/LDW provides coverage for damage to the vehicle. There is no need to purchase this if you have our policies, which include the CVPD coverage. A bit of savings for your budget! However, if you are renting a couple of vehicles for a short period of time and you aren’t so sure about your crew’s driving skills, you may choose to get this coverage from the rental company because the deductible is usually a lower amount. 

NOTE: NOT ALL POLICIES PROVIDED BY OTHER BROKERS WILL INCLUDE THIS COVERAGE. YOU NEED TO CHECK YOUR POLICY TO MAKE SURE YOU HAVE WHAT YOU NEED, OR CONTACT FRONT ROW AND WE CAN OBTAIN PROPER COVERAGE FOR YOU.

2. AUTO LIABILITY covers damage to property or injury to other parties:

Auto liability is the portion of the policy which is regulated by the government and, to make it more complicated, it is individually regulated by each province/territory. Below is a basic breakdown by province.

Will I need to budget for an Auto Liability policy for MY production?

Province:

Coverage provided by:

Do I need to buy Auto Liability?

Newfoundland

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

Nova Scotia

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

PEI

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

New Brunswick

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

Quebec

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

Ontario

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

Manitoba

Government

No, unless you wish to increase the limit provided by the rental company. Coverage is provided for a vehicle when purchasing / renewing the license plate.

Saskatchewan

Government

No, unless you wish to increase the limit provided by the rental company. Coverage is provided for a vehicle when purchasing / renewing the license plate.

Alberta

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

BC

Government

No, unless you wish to increase the limit provided by the rental company. Coverage is provided for a vehicle when purchasing / renewing the license plate.

NWT

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

Yukon

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

Nunavut

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

The above-mentioned coverage outline is meant for informational purposes only and does not represent advice on coverages required. Contact us if you have a specific need or question.

Auto liability is not an option; it needs to be in place for every car driven on public roads. Make sure you have the right coverage for your location and situation so production doesn’t get a ticket, or worse, be held responsible for injury to someone or damage to property.

Hired an intern or co-op student and want them to run errands in your rental car? Is that allowed?

Well, for once it’s not us being the careful ones! You will need to contact your rental company as many will have an age restriction on drivers. Some will restrict it to 21 or 25 years old, so make sure whoever is driving is actually allowed to, as it can nullify your coverage if they aren’t.

Have more questions about auto coverage? Feel free to give any of our Front Row offices a call!

REFER A FRIEND TO FRONT ROW INSURANCE

Based on customer demand, we’ve setup our referral marketing program and if you refer a friend to Front Row, you could win a $15 Amazon eGift Card OR be entered into a random draw to win a $99 Amazon eGift Card! (depending on your province)

RELATED POSTS:

FILM PRODUCTION COMPANIES AND CAMERA CARS: REDUCING THE RISK

FILM PRODUCTION INSURANCE AND RENTING CREW PERSONAL VEHICLES

AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE FOR FILMS

Topics: Entertainment Insurance, Film Production, Film Production Vehicle Insurance, non-owned auto insurance, automobile insurance for films, Intern Rights

Interns And Film, Television And Performing Arts Productions

Posted by Steve Beatty on Jul 14, 2015 11:16:00 AM

INTERNS AND FILM, TELEVISION AND PERFORMING ARTS PRODUCTIONS

180051_182557985117662_6147903_nInterns abound in film, television, and performing arts production. Every year young people develop their skills and gain knowledge through these hands-on work experiences. But for producers providing these opportunities, it's important to be aware of the allowable scope of the duties that can be assigned to interns.

In 2013, the Producers of the Charlie Rose show settled a $250,000 class-action lawsuit brought by unpaid interns. The action alleged that the Producers did not adhere to protocols set-out under the US Department of Labour codes, which say:

  • Duties must be educational for the intern
  • Duties would not be done by regular paid employees
  • Employer doesn't derive any immediate advantage from the intern
  • The intern is not entitled to a job following the internship
  • The intern understands that they are not entitled to a salary or wage

In Canada, there aren’t any laws directly regulating internships; however, standards could be considered if an action was to be brought against a Producer.

The Canadian Intern Association's (www.internassociation.ca) mandate is to advocate against the exploitation of interns and aim to improve the internship experience for both interns and employers. 

In a 2011 Canadian Press article, employment lawyer Andrew Langille, is quoted as saying upwards of 95% of unpaid internships (in Ontario) are probably illegal, because interns are doing work typically performed by paid employees.

If you are using interns, protect yourself by following some simple guidelines:

  • Clearly define the scope of the internship with the intern in advance of them starting the assignment
  • Communicate your policies to your staff and let them know what duties should not be assigned to an intern
  • Monitor the experience with the intern & your staff to make sure that the assignment is progressing as initially defined 

Many intern programs require you have accident insurance for your interns. Varying levels of insurance can be purchased at a reasonable cost either for the assignment or to cover all interns throughout a specified period.   Understanding whether your liability insurance will respond to claims related to an intern being injured is critical and a review of your policy is recommended before you decide to bring on an intern.

Interning is a proactive way for the industry to participate in developing the skills of their future production staff and it can be a terrific opportunity for young people who want to build a career in arts & entertainment, media & culture. As is the case with most things, clear and regular communication can help ensure it doesn't present an unexpected risk to you.

For additional reference information, please see:

  1. Hollywood Reporter blog article 'Charlie Rose' Interns Settle Unpaid Wages Lawsuit can be read here.
  2. Andrew Langille manages www.youthandwork.ca a website about youths, workplace law, economics, labour markets education & public policy.

Topics: Intern Rights