Sustainable Sets & Green Filmmaking – The Future of Power in Film

Posted by Grant Patten on Apr 6, 2020 9:03:19 AM

Sustainable Sets & Green Filmmaking – The Future of Power in Film

Generator: Sustainable Sets & Green FilmmakingSource: Royalty-free stock photo ID: 657678478 (Shutterstock)

TRADITIONAL Generators for film production – the issues involved

Powering a film production is an expensive business. Your typical power set-up is a centralized grid, involving at least one or two 400A diesel generators. That number can rapidly rise to 20 on large, high-draw productions. This ‘overpowering’ of film sets has been the status quo for decades.

Diesel generators have made us pretty lazy with our math - we basically just add up the lights we have and supply enough power to turn them all on at once, all day long, with lots left over for heating up all the snacks”
Kerri Coombs, Vancouver Gaffer

A single generator emits a noise level of 73 decibels – louder than a standard vacuum cleaner – and 2.6 kg of CO2 per litre of diesel burned. As a result, they must be placed far enough from set to avoid being picked up by sound or damaging air quality and the health of the crew. This practice has a number of challenges.

Rigging crews spend days setting up hundreds of feet of three-phase seaway cable or 4/0 heavy gauge cable to transmit power to set, as well as mats to ensure traffic can pass over the cabling without damage. Due to the distances involved, this can lead to line loss and restricts set design to specific locations that allow access. Productions using generators must also procure costly permits and hire generator operators to bring in and monitor the units during shooting.

What’s more, even before the generator operators (a.k.a. Genny Ops) roll in the 400A generators to energize the grid, the pre-production crew often must use loud, noxious 6k and 2k gas generators for power until the diesel power grid is energized. All of this – the noise, the harmful fumes, the cabling and disruption – is in large part responsible for the growing friction between film crews and the residents of the world’s most famous film cities. This is leading to some neighbourhoods refusing permits for film crews to work there at all.

Powering the film industry’s grid with decentralized clean technology / Portable Electric / electric generators

Decentralization of the power grid is a growing trend within the film industry. Leading professionals, such as David Sinfield and his team – known for their work on No Time To Die, Wonder Woman and Venom 2 – have already moved to a hybrid model. This involves using a reduced number of 400A diesel generators to deliver overall set power, while bringing in clean battery electric generators for peripheral power loads and confined or restrictive locations.

As a result, teams around the world are achieving creative visions that would otherwise be prohibitively expensive or actually impossible. A recent example was found when a crew used Portable Electric’s VOLTstack 2k and 5k electric generators to create a 360° IMAX shot. Due to their emissions-free and silent nature, these units could be placed directly beside the Technocrane holding the camera. The production, in turn, saved the unnecessary double expense of laying out hundreds of feet of cable, only to paint it all out in the editor’s suite.

Some pioneering productions are going one step further by completely decentralizing their grids. A Vancouver-based indie production, The Victim, used only VOLTstack electric generators to park power wherever they needed it for everything from their video village and catering, to balloon lights and HMI lamps during a day and night shoot.

I had no problem convincing the producers this was a great idea. As far as producers are concerned, no cable, no noise, and instant power on demand is like a dream come true
– Kerri Coombs, gaffer on The Victim

This simply required a shift in their approach to energy budgeting. “The industry regularly uses 18,000 watt lights for night shooting, which is why most of the night scenes you see nowadays look weird and unnatural, with blue light where all the darkness should be,” explains Kerri.

Instead, they swapped conventional fixtures with LED Skypanels, a staple lighting solution that uses a fifth of the power while achieving the same effect as conventional fixtures. Consequently, not only did decentralizing their grid create huge cost savings on cabling, mats, fuel and production manpower, it also ensured they achieved a powerful creative vision.

The lighting looked great - we didn’t have to sacrifice production value to scale down our power needs. There were a lot of high fives.

Generators for film production / electric generators – risk management & insurance considerations

Whether you’re using a diesel or electric generator, there can be certain risks that come along with generator use on set. A specialized film insurance broker is best able to present the risks associated with your film production to the film insurance underwriter to ensure you receive the best coverage and premium for your production.

Front Row Insurance Brokers are specialized Film Insurance Brokers. Please contact us if you have any questions.

Guest post written by Lisa Gheysen, Copywriter, on behalf of Portable Electric Ltd.

About Portable Electric:

Portable Electric (PE) is a Vancouver-based tech disruptor that builds, rents and sells the VOLTstack Power Station, revolutionizing the way critical power is delivered. They provide film productions, event organizers, construction sites, disaster zones and more, an alternative to loud, noxious gas and diesel generators.

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Topics: Film insurance broker, film insurance underwriter, sustainability

How to Protect Your Camera Lens(es)

Posted by Grant Patten on Mar 16, 2020 7:26:59 AM

How to Protect Your Camera Lens(es)

How to Protect Your Camera Lens(es)

Protect your camera lens with a filter / protect your camera lens from scratches

Even if you’re not using a filter to obtain any particular photographic effect, it’s still wise to keep a filter on your camera lens in order to add a layer of protection. A UV or ND filter could be used; either filter will help prevent scratches from getting on the lens.

The AmazonBasics UV Protection Camera Lens Filter would likely do the job, but you could also go with something fancier such as the K&F Concept 82MM Ultra Slim ND Filter Adjustable Neutral Density Filter if you’re willing to spend a bit more. [Amazon Affiliate Links]

Protect your camera lens with a lens cap / camera lens cover / camera lens protector

It may seem obvious, but the lens cap is under-appreciated and best practices around using lens caps are often not followed, so it’s worth reminding: you should keep lens caps (both front and rear) on your lenses at all times when you’re not using them, such as when they’re in a camera bag.

The lens cap that came with your camera might be perfectly adequate, but do you have a backup? There might also be some better, sturdier lens caps out there that would be a good fit for your camera. It’s worth doing some research.

The Lens Cap Bundle - 4 Snap-on Lens Caps for DSLR Cameras from CAMKIX is worth a look. The Nikon LF-4 Rear Lens Cap is also well reviewed. [Amazon Affiliate Links]

Protect your camera lens with a lens hood / DSLR lens hood / camera lens hood

Along with helping prevent ugly flares in your pictures, lens hoods also serve the purpose of physically protecting your lens AND filter. If you hit an object with your lens, chances are the hood will hit it first and keep your lens and filter undamaged.

The Kiwifotos 50mm Reversible Lens Hood seems to have mostly positive reviews on Amazon. The FOTGA Bayonet Mount Lens Hood is also well reviewed. [Amazon Affiliate Links]

Protect your camera lens with good camera cleaning gear / lens cleaning kit / camera lens cleaning kit / DSLR cleaning kit / camera cleaning kit

If you’re actually using your camera gear, then inevitably some dust and/or “gunk” will get on the surface of the lens and a proper camera cleaning kit is therefore essential.

Notable product review site Wirecutter recommends for camera cleaning:

How to protect your camera lens from fungus / camera lens cleaning

You’ll want to follow certain best practices in cleaning your camera lens in order to prevent it from getting fungal damage. If you shoot outdoors, but then you just toss your lens into a camera bag without wiping everything down, your lens will eventually turn into an expensive Petri dish.

Store your camera and lens in a cool, dry place. If this isn’t possible because you’re shooting in a warm environment, consider purchasing a portable/mini dehumidifier that can be placed next to your camera and lens when stored away. The yaufey Mini Dehumidifier is one example of such a product. The Pro Breeze Electric Mini Dehumidifier is also an option. [Amazon Affiliate Links]

Microfiber clothes are ideal for cleaning and drying lenses. Some of these clothes are designed specifically for lenses, such as the Nikon 8072 Microfiber Cleaning Cloth and the MagicFiber Microfiber Cleaning Cloth [Amazon Affiliate Links].

Don’t just leave your lenses in the sun to dry them. This can cause problems.

Protect your camera lens with a solid camera strap / camera wrist strap / camera neck strap / camera shoulder strap / DSLR camera strap / best camera strap

It just doesn’t make sense to use a cheap, shoddy camera strap to hold an expensive camera/lens. You’re asking for trouble if you do that as the strap could conceivably snap at any point, damaging your camera lens. It doesn’t have to be expensive, but a decent camera strap is a great investment.

There are many different types of camera straps:

Protect your camera lens with a good camera bag / DSLR camera bag / best camera bag

Especially if you have more than one camera and multiple lenses, you’ll also want to put some thought into getting a good camera bag – this will also help protect your lenses.

The Peak Design Everyday Messenger Bag [Amazon Affiliate Link] has a waterproof galaxy foam bottom liner and was recommended by Wirecutter. The waterproof Tenba Cooper 13 Slim [Amazon Affiliate Link] was also recommended by Wirecutter.

Clean your compartments/bag of all the lint you can before putting lenses in it. Include some silica gel desiccant [Amazon Affiliate Link] in the bag to absorb residual moisture.

Ideally, keep the camera bag away from radiators and places that might be damp. Somewhere between 5°C and 10°C is a good temperature.

Protect your camera lens with a sturdy tripod / camera tripod mount / video camera tripod / tripod stand for DSLR

After investing so much into your camera lens, it would be a shame to then put that camera on a weak tripod, only to have it tip over, smash into the ground and crack the lens. Using a sturdy tripod that is appropriately sized for your camera body and lens is an excellent preventative measure.

The Sirui W-1004K10 Tripod Kit River Runner was recommended by Wirecutter as a sturdy tripod. The GEEKOTO Tripod 200cm is also well reviewed on Amazon. [Amazon Affiliate Links]

Photography Insurance | Photography equipment insurance | Camera insurance | Photographer Insurance | photographer liability insurance

Following these tips will hopefully allow you to avoid any damage to your camera lens – but in case that does happen – you’d ideally have insurance coverage in place.

Front Row’s photography insurance policy is a good option for insuring your photo gear. Many Canadian photographers have come to recognize Front Row as the industry’s best coverage – and rely upon us to protect their valuable camera gear. You can get a quote online, purchase a policy online in 5 mins, or read more about the coverages available here: https://photographer.frontrowinsurance.com/

Refer a Friend to Front Row Insurance

Based on customer demand, we’ve setup our referral marketing program and if you refer a friend to Front Row, you could win a $15 Amazon eGift Card OR be entered into a random draw to win a $99 Amazon eGift Card! (depending on your province)

 

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DISCLAIMER: Informational statements regarding insurance coverage are for general description purposes only. These statements do not amend, modify or supplement any insurance policy. Consult the actual policy or your broker for details regarding terms, conditions, coverage, exclusions, products, services and programs which may be available to you. Your eligibility for particular products and services is subject to the final determination of underwriting qualifications and acceptance by the insurance underwriting company providing such products or services. This website does not make any representations that coverage does or does not exist for any particular claim or loss, or type of claim or loss, under any policy. Whether coverage exists or does not exist for any particular claim or loss under any policy depends on the facts and circumstances involved in the claim or loss and all applicable policy wording.

Amazon Associates Disclosure: Front Row Insurance is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon. This post may contain affiliate links. There is no additional cost to you.

Citations:

Topics: Film insurance broker, Camera Insurance, photography insurance

How can a film producer protect themselves from an E&O claim?

Posted by Steve Fraser on Jan 6, 2020 8:53:11 AM

How can a film producer protect themselves from an E&O claim?

FOLLOW THE E&O CLEARANCE PROCEDURES

E&O INSURANCE FILM | ERRORS AND OMISSIONS INSURANCE FILM:


Steve Fraser (Lawyer)
: A film producer can protect himself, herself or itself (because most producers incorporate) by following the clearance procedures that are included with your E&O application and/or E&O policy.

So, get yourself an entertainment lawyer, take a look at those clearance procedures, make sure you’re following them and you will avoid claims forever. The other thing you should do is get friendly with your insurance broker – they’re very helpful.

Related:

About: Stephen "Steve" Fraser is an international entertainment business and legal affairs lawyer in the film and television industries with co-production, financing and distribution experience.

Topics: Entertainment Insurance, Film insurance broker, Film Producer's E&O Insurance, Title reports

Preventing Film Equipment Theft – Tips & Tricks

Posted by Grant Patten on May 7, 2019 6:38:08 AM

All this lovely gear was stolen! Don’t let this be your gear. All this lovely gear was stolen! Don’t let this be your gear.

Thanks to cooperation between the FBI, the US embassy and Argentinian federal police, this massive haul of film production gear worth ~$3M was recovered in September 2018. The thieves had apparently targeted equipment in Hollywood and other US cities and then smuggled it into Argentina. As of May 2019, four people have been arrested in the US and 17 suspects have been identified in Argentina.

Film Equipment Theft – Prevention Tips

We’ve provided some tips & tricks for how to guard your film equipment, as well as some information on how to insure your equipment so you are protected in any worst case scenario situations.

1. Exterior/Location Filming

  • Key individuals should be responsible and accountable for transporting equipment from trucks and trailers to the filming set/location
  • There should be a tracking process established for logging equipment in/out when transported between destinations
  • Securely store equipment when not in use, especially hard-to-replace items like custom props, sets and wardrobes
  • Station security personnel within sight of exposed equipment, ideally at all times
  • Heighten security presence whenever filming in crime-ridden neighbourhoods

2. Interior Filming

  • Always favour buildings that have a central security alarm system, and check with building facilities that the system is actually running properly
  • Favour buildings that have security guard personnel on site
  • The building ideally has a concierge who facilitates logging in/approval of visitors
  • If you need to store equipment in the building overnight, double-check that the room is secure and inform security personnel about it

3. Employee/Crew Theft

  • Have written policy in place informing cast/crew that it is unacceptable to take any objects from set as “souvenirs”; clearly communicate policy to cast/crew
  • Conduct reference/background checks on all new employees/crewmembers
  • All employees/crewmembers should wear highly visible ID badges while on set
  • Make use of sign-in/sign-out sheets for entering/exiting locations
  • Conduct inventory checks on regular basis

4. Vehicles (including rental cars, vans and trucks)

  • Ensure vehicles transporting valuable equipment are as nondescript as possible (don’t call attention to the vehicles)
  • Any equipment stored in a vehicle should always be locked and kept out of sight (e.g., covered with blankets)
  • Ideally have multiple drivers available to limit the number of extended stops and take turns monitoring the vehicle during stops
  • If overnight: ideally stay at reputable hotels; hotel parking lots should be well-lit and monitored by cameras and security guards

5. Air Travel (planes carrying production equipment)

  • Always have a clearly marked luggage tag and have a card with emergency contact information placed inside the luggage/container
  • Whenever possible, carry some valuable items onto the plane instead of checking them in, such as laptops and smaller cameras
  • Maintain an inventory listing the shipped items, along with planned shipping itinerary and equipment serial numbers

Consider Film Equipment Insurance – DigiGear

There seems to be no published information on whether or not the equipment involved in the Hollywood-Argentina smuggle was insured. If it wasn’t insured, no doubt, the owners of said equipment were likely kicking themselves after this massive theft occurred.

Avoid a similar fate by insuring your film equipment with Front Row under a DigiGear policy.

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CITATIONS:

https://news.sky.com/story/huge-haul-of-stolen-hollywood-film-equipment-found-in-argentina-11498283

Chubb PDF T3-FilmEqTheft-3-19 https://www.chubb.com

Topics: Film equipment insurance, Film Insurance, Film insurance broker, DigiGear

Film Production Insurance for Renovation Shows

Posted by David Hamilton on Jan 9, 2019 3:09:19 PM

reno shows film insuranceImage credit: Shutterstock Royalty-free stock photo ID: 267766223 

film production insurance for renovation shows

Arranging film production insurance for your renovation (reno) show should be done with the help of a specialized entertainment insurance broker.

The following information is to be used as a general reference only and does not alter the insurance policy wording for your specific production. In all cases, actual coverage is subject to the policy language, terms and conditions of the long form policies to be issued by the insurance company. Additionally, the following is not intended to be legal advice but rather are general recommendations intended to reduce your exposure to an insurance claim. When entering contracts with anyone you should consult a lawyer to draft appropriate language for your specific circumstances and to ensure that you are adequately protected.

With renovation shows we suggest that you consider the following guidelines:
  • Hire a general contractor to oversee major changes and the general contractor should be responsible for hiring subcontractors.
  • Insist that the general contractor and subcontractors provide you with proof of liability insurance for their operations in the form of an insurance certificate issued by their insurance company.
  • The insurance certificate should evidence coverage for Products and Completed Operations, should contain a cross liability and sever ability of interest clause and name the production company as an additional insured.
  • Homeowners should review and sign a release containing a hold harmless and waiver of subrogation clause against the production company.
  • Where possible homeowners should be included in the renovation decision making process for each change made.
  • Your contract with the general contractor should contain a hold harmless provision protecting prod co from any claims arising from work completed by the contractor.  You should also consider an indemnity provision requiring the contractor to pay you back for any expenses, claims or suits brought against you resulting from their negligence or faulty workmanship.
  • Have you made arrangements with the contractors to come back and fix problems with the homes?  Does the contractor provide a warranty on work performed?  The contract should be between the homeowner and general contractor (not the production company).

Ultimately the homeowner could sue the production company and the contractor if they feel work was poorly done but adopting some of the guidelines above, having contractors who are properly insured and including the homeowner in decisions being made would greatly reduce your exposure to loss.

Decorating shows that involve changing room colours and adding new furniture etc. are less risky than more major renovations but when you are working on any third party properties there is a greater risk of something going wrong. Use a specialized film insurance broker to ensure you are properly covered.

Topics: Film Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, Film insurance broker

Insurance for Theft of Camera and Film Equipment

Posted by Casey Budden on Oct 24, 2018 10:43:17 AM

Camera insurance Canada - woman on phone

INSURANCE FOR THEFT OF CAMERA AND FILM EQUIPMENT

Action!

You’ve finally gotten to the meat of the production: the principal photography phase. Much of the busywork is done; now for the fun part!

Unfortunately, as it so often does, disaster strikes at the worst time: a rented vehicle used in the production is stolen from the set. Worse, it contained an expensive piece of camera equipment (also rented). The vehicle is quickly recovered, but the camera equipment is nowhere to be found and there is damage to the vehicle. The cost of your production is suddenly mounting very quickly.

Could this have been prevented?

A commercial vehicle physical damage policy covers accidents mentioned above.

You’ll also want to ensure your production has production equipment insurance, which covers you against physical loss of or damage to, or destruction of, cameras, sound, lighting and grip equipment which are owned or rented by the production company.

A film production is a complex animal; you want the process to be as seamless as possible. Wouldn’t it be nice if there was one less thing to think about?

Ensure that your production is adequately covered so that you can concentrate on filmmaking rather than financing.

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Topics: Film equipment insurance, Film insurance broker, Camera Insurance, DigiGear

Camera and Film Processing Insurance

Posted by Casey Budden on Oct 24, 2018 10:30:32 AM

film processing insurance

camera & film processing insurance

Put the Finishing Touches on your Film Without Worry.

Congratulations! Principal photography on your production is complete and so far, everything has gone off without a hitch. You’ve managed to remain on budget, and footage was delivered to the post facility on time. While you understand that editing is both an art and a science, the cut of the film you got back was not what you were looking for. Instead of seamless edits, you got jump cuts!

While faulty editing is a problem that will cost your production time and money, it’s not the most serious risk you face at this stage. Let’s consider a second scenario:

Imagine you’re making a documentary about jazz. Your sound engineer composes an original piece to be used as background music in a scene. All is well and good until a famous jazz musician sues for copyright infringement, claiming that the music is too similar to a well-known piece of theirs. While you know the case would be won in court, the associated delay and cost would harm your production.

Your film is slated to be broadcast in a matter of months, and the clock is ticking.

The best defense against unforeseen perils such as the above is a specialized film insurance policy designed to protect you, the filmmaker. An Entertainment Package Policy includes:

1. Faulty Stock, Camera, & Processing insurance.

Faulty Stock, Camera & Processing insurance provides protection against:

  • Loss, damage or destruction of raw film or tape stock, exposed film (developed or undeveloped), recorded video tape, sound tracks and tapes, caused by or resulting from fogging or the use of faulty equipment (including cameras and videotape recorders)
  • Faulty sound equipment
  • Faulty developing
  • Faulty editing and faulty processing
  • Accidental erasure of videotape recording

But does not cover: Loss caused by errors of judgment in exposure, lighting or sound recording, or from the use of incorrect type of camera, lens, raw film or tape stock.

2. Commercial General Liability.

This is a standard liability coverage included in entertainment package policies which will arrange a defense if you are sued for reasons connected with your production, regardless of whether the suit has any merit. Returning to the example above involving music, this coverage would prevent you from having to pay for legal defense costs out of pocket.

You’ve come too far to let unforeseen circumstances put you behind.

Make sure you have the right insurance coverage.

Topics: Film insurance broker, Camera Insurance

Effortless and Affordable Short-Term Film Insurance Canada

Posted by David Hamilton on May 27, 2016 3:49:23 PM

short film insurance


Short film insurance (Canada) can be arranged quickly through Front Row. Front Row's online short shoot program is quite popular with new and established filmmakers because of the low cost and the simple process to arrange a policy.

Note: the online program is for individuals who live or have a company in Canada at this time; however, worldwide coverage is available to Canadian filmmakers. For a US short film insurance quote, complete this form.

To provide you with a short film insurance quote, we need a few details. The fastest way to receive a quote is to complete this short application telling us about your project:

Get a 2 Minute Quote

We can provide Short-Term Equipment Insurance starting at $300 CAD!

If you would like to add film location liability for one week , we can do so for a small additional premium.

Front Row Insurance can also provide affordable coverage for: 

If you would like an annual policy to cover multiple productions, please visit our D.I.C.E Page (Documentaries, Industrial Films, Commercials, Educational Films – it also covers short shoots, music videos and feature films with lower budgets).

Topics: Short Film Insurance, Film Insurance, Film insurance broker, Film Location Insurance, film school insurance

How To Reduce The Cost To Insure Your Photography Equipment

Posted by David Hamilton on Aug 18, 2015 4:16:53 PM

photography equipment insurance

It would seem obvious that one of the simplest ways to lower the cost of camera insurance is to assure the insurance company that the camera gear is safe and secure in your possession: but, what does this mean?

First of all, use an insurance broker that is experienced in arranging camera equipment insurance. As specialized camera insurance brokers, we represent you to the insurance company to ensure that you receive the best premium and coverage available in the marketplace for your photography insurance. Coverage now available online: https://photographer.frontrowinsurance.com

Every photography equipment insurance application will ask how your gear will be protected. The underwriters charge for discomfort, so give them detailed answers that make them comfortable.

Good underwriting information for photography equipment insurance:

  1. Warranting that you will have a bonded security guard watch the gear overnight if you are shooting on location.
  2. If you do not hire a security guard, pack your gear back into the truck(s) and park it in a secure compound overnight such as a tow truck yard. They often have excellent security: fenced and floodlit, manned 24/7 and dogs!
  3. Return your gear to the equipment rental house so you are not responsible overnight.
  4. Cable your gear that is not being used when shooting on the streets in a busy urban area.
  5. Avoid checking your bags when flying. Mysterious disappearance is not covered; you need to have an idea of the date and time when the equipment was stolen.
  6. Motion alarms [Amazon Affiliate Link] are useful when shooting on location. Wedding photographers find these movement alarms useful as they cannot carry all their gear around the wedding. Put it inside your pelican case or bag and a siren will go off if someone picks it up.
  7. GPS [Amazon Affiliate Link] and proximity alarms are also worth exploring. Let your photography insurance broker know that you have purchased these items.

Good information based on a little planning will ensure that you receive the best premium.

Front Row has online photography insurance: https://photographer.frontrowinsurance.com. Insure your gear for as low as $100 (plus a fee). Get a quote in 2 minutes; a policy in 5 minutes. Worldwide coverage. Protect your gear against: theft, breakage, fire and more. Liability is also available.

Refer a Friend to Front Row Insurance

Based on customer demand, we’ve setup our referral marketing program and if you refer a friend to Front Row, you could win a $15 Amazon eGift Card OR be entered into a random draw to win a $99 Amazon eGift Card! (depending on your province)

DISCLAIMER: Informational statements regarding insurance coverage are for general description purposes only. These statements do not amend, modify or supplement any insurance policy. Consult the actual policy or your broker for details regarding terms, conditions, coverage, exclusions, products, services and programs which may be available to you. Your eligibility for particular products and services is subject to the final determination of underwriting qualifications and acceptance by the insurance underwriting company providing such products or services. This website does not make any representations that coverage does or does not exist for any particular claim or loss, or type of claim or loss, under any policy. Whether coverage exists or does not exist for any particular claim or loss under any policy depends on the facts and circumstances involved in the claim or loss and all applicable policy wording.

Amazon Associates Disclosure: Front Row Insurance is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon. This post may contain affiliate links. There is no additional cost to you.

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Topics: Film insurance broker, Camera Insurance, photography insurance

Front Row Insurance Brokers opens an office in Los Angeles

Posted by David Hamilton on Feb 20, 2014 5:17:00 PM

Canada's largest Film Insurance Broker expands to LA

Vancouver, Canada - - February 20 2014 -- Front Row is pleased to announce the opening of their first office in the United States. The US company will be known as Front Row Insurance Brokers, LLC and will be located at: 14156 Magnolia Blvd, Suite 200, Sherman Oaks, CA 91423.

The Los Angeles office will be headed up by well known film insurance veteran Kent Hamilton. Kent can be reached at 424-529-6700.

Kent will be supported by Mike Groner and Tina Ortiz.

Front Row is licensed and registered in every province and is Canada's largest specialized film insurance broker. Front Row represents: each of the four major film insurance companies: Chubb, Premiere/Everest, Allianz/Firemans Fund and Travelers / St Paul.

"An opportunity arose to bring Kent and his team into Front Row and we quickly worked to make that happen," says David Hamilton, President of Front Row based in Vancouver. "We are delighted that Kent decided to join Front Row given the multiple offers that he received from other brokerage firms." Kent was previously a Senior Vice President at Truman Van Dyke in Los Angeles where he specialized in arranging insurance coverage for film and TV productions.

Front Row is an independent film insurance broker that works on behalf of producers to transfer the risks of filming to insurance companies for a premium charge. Should a claim occur, Front Row ensures that the production company receives the money that they are owed per the insurance policy as quickly as possible.

Topics: Film insurance broker, US Film insurance broker