On Set Headsets: Walkie-talkie Headsets and Earpieces for Filmmaking

Posted by Matthew Tingey on Feb 24, 2021 7:48:33 AM

On Set Headsets: Walkie-talkie Headsets and Earpieces for Filmmaking

On Set Headsets

Guest blog post by On Set Headsets

Whether you are a first-time production assistant or a veteran filmmaker, you will have to become familiar with walkie-talkies. Communication is a major component of filmmaking and this is normally done through a walkie-talkie that each crewmember is given at the beginning of the shoot.

Then comes a decision that could possibly affect the rest of your career: do you take the old production supplied drive-thru headset that has probably been used since When Harry Met Sally (1989)? Alternatively, did you come prepared with your own brand-new surveillance headset from On Set Headsets?

Thankfully, On Set Headsets has all the gear you need to make the right decision.

On Set Headsets is the #1 choice for surveillance earpieces in Hollywood. From the snowy mountains in Vancouver to the jungles of Hawaii, our products have been holding up wherever film crews go. For the travelling crewmember, here’s a look at some of our featured products:

FilmPro X | Motorola Walkie-talkie Headset

Designed in-house, the new FilmPro X [pictured above] allows the user to listen to their walkie-talkie and Comtek [device used to listen to actors’ mics] at the same time.

Our specially designed FilmPro X (short for ‘cross’) eliminates the need to wear a separate earpiece for your Comtek, as it crosses both wires into one.

Perfect for ADs and ACs who need to listen-in on the action, the FilmPro X will make sure you hear what you need to, when you need to. To protect your investment, we also throw in a free travel case as well as offer a Lifetime Warranty on the FilmPro X, so you can breathe easy and stay focused on your work.

The Shorty | Walkie-talkie Shortened Headset for Chest Rigs

Onsetheadsets ShortyPossibly the most anticipated product that we have for 2021 is the Shorty, a headset we make specifically for chest pack users.

Taken from the same design as our most popular headset, the FilmPro, the Shorty is just a shortened version so that it fits perfectly in chest packs. No more “rat’s nest” of cables in your chest pack with the Shorty!

Tubeez | Threaded Walkie-talkie Earpiece

Add a little spice to your set wear with your own custom Tubeez, an acoustic tube that comes in different styles and colours. Once Tubeez hit the market in 2019, they have been on fire. Borrowing from the same technology that scuba divers use to wrap their cables, we “wrap” acoustic tubes with a soft nylon fabric.

Onsetheadsets TubeezThis makes what used to be a cold, hard, plastic tube into a soft and comfortable earpiece that you can wear all day long. In 2021, we are excited to introduce four brand-new Tubeez colours – Gold Fleek, Indigo Purple, Totally Teal and Turquoise Turtle. Standby in style with a Tubeez!

As always, your headset is only as good as our assurance. That is why we offer a 1-Year Guarantee on all our headsets. And whenever we need film insurance, we go to our friends at Front Row Insurance!

Get Film Insurance | Short-Term Film Production Insurance | Film and Video Equipment Insurance | Videographer Insurance

Front Row provides production and producer’s E&O insurance for: features, episodic television, docs, shorts and more. The next time you’re working on a film production, consider Front Row’s insurance policies:

Front Row’s Short Shoot insurance policy (Canada) is a good option for insuring your short-term film projects. Coverage for up to 15 consecutive days of filming. The coverage is available online, 24/7. Covers rented gear, rented locations, rented props, sets, wardrobes, and more. You can get a quote in two minutes and purchase a policy 100% online. If you are in the US, please complete this form.

Front Row’s DigiGear insurance policy (Canada) is a good option for insuring your filmmaking gear, including your film and video camera(s). Also available online. Quotes in 2 minutes; policies available in 5 minutes. Shop from your phone. If you are in the US, please complete this form.

 

About On Set Headsets:

On Set Headsets is a Vancouver-based company that is dedicated to providing the local and international film industry with high quality film gear. Founded by a filmmaker for filmmakers, On Set Headsets is consistently rated at the top of the surveillance earpiece market. Our products can be found in over 14 cities spanning across four countries through our exclusive distributors. Whenever you’re on a set, just take a look at the crew and you will most likely see them using our products. When you need headsets on set, call On Set Headsets.

About Front Row:

Front Row Insurance Brokers Inc. is an independent insurance broker that specializes in the entertainment industry – specifically, the film and photography industries. Front Row works hard to provide insurance protection for a very low cost. Should a claim occur, Front Row works diligently with clients and insurers to expedite the payment of claims. Offices in: Vancouver, Toronto, Montreal, Halifax, NY, Nashville and LA.

Related Posts:

Images in this guest blog post were provided with permission from On Set Headsets

Topics: Short Film Insurance, Film Production, Film Production Companies, DigiGear, insurance for film set

US Filmmakers: Navigating Your Certificate of Insurance

Posted by Alyson Locacciato on Aug 4, 2020 7:12:51 AM

US Filmmakers: Navigating Your Certificate of Insurance

If you’re a Canada-based filmmaker, read this blog post instead.

Congratulations, you successfully purchased your production insurance! Your broker has sent you a confirmation that your coverage is bound, a summary, invoice, and certificate of insurance. You review all of your paperwork and estimates from the rental house and permit office, but how do you know what coverage is what, or if you even purchased the correct coverage?

things that may go missed on a certificate that can ‘make or break’ you on the day of production:

  1. Make sure the production company’s name and address are correct. Rushed through the application? This is the time to triple check any spelling errors.
  2. If you are working (especially) on a Short-Term Production (US), double-check the effective dates. Make sure you include any additional pickup/drop-off dates that may be needed for props or rentals.
  3. Did a permit office request any special wording? This is the time to make sure you have the exact wording on your certificate as the insurance requirements noted.

Below is a sample certificate. We will review each section so you can properly understand what you are looking at.

US Certificate of Insurance

Ok, so from the top!

The highlighted section on the left is where your company information is located.

The highlighted section on the right is your insurance company. You will notice it shows insurer “A” and insurer “B”. This will correspond to the boxes on the far left side to show which company is which.

The non-highlighted section below is your insurance broker’s information.

US Certificate of Insurance

This next part is VERY important, especially when it comes to Film LA. See the box that says “ADDL INSR”? That stands for Additional Insured, and the “Y” stands for yes. Next to that column, there is wording “SUBR WVD” this stands for Waiver of Subrogation.

This is a waiver that you must request in advance and most likely will cost additional premium. Without a “Y” under “ADDL INSR” and “SUBR WVD”- your insurance coverage will not be sufficient for Film LA.

The next part of the “grid” will delegate the policy number and the start and end dates of coverage. If you need additional days for a short shoot, reach out to your broker immediately. If you request additional coverage dates after the expiration of coverage, you will be responsible for purchasing a new policy.

The bottom right highlighted section is what your rental/prop house will review. Keep in mind, this amount is not the value to rent the equipment. The amount is to replace the item in the case of a total loss.

The section ‘ded’ that is highlighted stands for your retention or deductible. The deductible or retention is the amount you will have to pay the insurance company in a case of a loss that exceeds the deductible.

Example: You rent a camera that has a replacement value of $50,000. The camera gets lost in transit. This means that for the insurance company to replace the camera, you will have to pay the deductible amount.

Example: You rent a grip accessory and the replacement value is $150. The grip accessory is damaged during the shoot. Since the accessories replacement value is less than the deductible, the insurance company will not cover the loss.

US Certificate of Insurance

Note: Remember insurer “A” and insurer “B”? You can now see them on the far right column.

This row on your certificate is where any special wording would be located. If you need a rental house to be named additional insured, this is where the wording would be located.

US Certificate of Insurance

Note: Whenever there is a need for special wording on your certificate, please notify your broker. This is something only your broker can process.

Last section! So, the certificate holder will be the entity that requested to be named additional insured, loss payee, or certificate holder. If a rental house has requested to be named additional insured, this is where you would find their name and address.

US Certificate of Insurance

 

About: Front Row Insurance Brokers Inc. is an independent insurance broker that provides film insurance for a very low cost. Should a claim occur, Front Row works diligently with insurers and clients to expedite the payment of claims.

Related:

Canadian Filmmakers: Certificate of Insurance

Getting a film permit in Los Angeles / Film LA

DISCLAIMER: Informational statements regarding insurance coverage are for general description purposes only. These statements do not amend, modify or supplement any insurance policy. Consult the actual policy or your broker for details regarding terms, conditions, coverage, exclusions, products, services and programs which may be available to you. Your eligibility for particular products and services is subject to the final determination of underwriting qualifications and acceptance by the insurance underwriting company providing such products or services. This website does not make any representations that coverage does or does not exist for any particular claim or loss, or type of claim or loss, under any policy. Whether coverage exists or does not exist for any particular claim or loss under any policy depends on the facts and circumstances involved in the claim or loss and all applicable policy wording.

Topics: Short Film Insurance, Film Production, Film Producers, DICE Insurance, Film Production Companies, US Film insurance broker, Certificates

Canadian Filmmakers: Navigating Your Certificate of Insurance

Posted by Alyson Locacciato on Aug 4, 2020 7:12:08 AM

Canadian Filmmakers: Navigating Your Certificate of Insurance

If you’re a US-based filmmaker, read this blog post instead.

Congratulations, you successfully purchased your production insurance! Your broker has sent you a confirmation that your coverage is bound, a summary, invoice, and certificate of insurance. You review all of your paperwork and estimates from the rental house and permit office, but how do you know what coverage is what, or if you even purchased the correct coverage?

things that may go missed on a certificate that can ‘make or break’ you on the day of production:

  1. Make sure the production company’s name and address are correct. Rushed through the application? This is the time to triple check any spelling errors.
  2. If you are working (especially) on a Short-Term Production, double-check the effective dates. Make sure you include any additional pickup/drop-off dates that may be needed for props or rentals.
  3. Did a permit office request any special wording? This is the time to make sure you have the exact wording on your certificate as the insurance requirements noted.

Below is a sample certificate of insurance for Canadian film productions. We will review each section so you can properly understand what you are looking at.

Certificate of Insurance Canada

Ok, so from the top!

The highlighted section below is where your company information is located.

The non-highlighted section below is your insurance broker’s information.

Certificate of Insurance Canada

The next part of the first page will delegate the policy number and the start and end dates of coverage. If you need additional days for a short shoot, reach out to your broker immediately. If you request additional coverage dates after the expiration of coverage, you will be responsible for purchasing a new policy.

Certificate of Insurance Canada

If a permit office, rental house, or specific entity you are working with has requested special wording on a certificate, it will go here. If you do need special wording on your certificate, please make sure you reach out to your broker in advance. Special wording or endorsements such as a “Waiver of Subrogation” may take up to 24-48 hours to process from the carrier.

Certificate of Insurance Canada

The following pages of your certificate of insurance will outline the limits of insurance and retention or deductible. The deductible or retention is the amount you will have to pay the insurance company in a case of a loss that exceeds the deductible, and is located on the far right column.

Example: You rent a camera that has a replacement value of $50,000. The camera gets lost in transit. This means that for the insurance company to replace the camera, you will have to pay the deductible amount.

Example: You rent a grip accessory and the replacement value is $150. The grip accessory is damaged during the shoot. Since the accessory’s replacement value is less than the deductible, the insurance company will not cover the loss.

Certificate of Insurance Canada Schedule AHave more questions on the coverages on the far left column? Contact us.

 

About: Front Row Insurance Brokers Inc. is an independent insurance broker that provides film insurance for a very low cost. Should a claim occur, Front Row works diligently with insurers and clients to expedite the payment of claims.

Related:

Adding an Additional Insured

US Filmmakers: Certificate of Insurance

DISCLAIMER: Informational statements regarding insurance coverage are for general description purposes only. These statements do not amend, modify or supplement any insurance policy. Consult the actual policy or your broker for details regarding terms, conditions, coverage, exclusions, products, services and programs which may be available to you. Your eligibility for particular products and services is subject to the final determination of underwriting qualifications and acceptance by the insurance underwriting company providing such products or services. This website does not make any representations that coverage does or does not exist for any particular claim or loss, or type of claim or loss, under any policy. Whether coverage exists or does not exist for any particular claim or loss under any policy depends on the facts and circumstances involved in the claim or loss and all applicable policy wording.

Topics: Short Film Insurance, Film Insurance, Film Production, Film Producers, DICE Insurance, Film Production Companies, insurance for film set, Certificates

Filmmakers & Videographers in the Field During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Posted by Grant Patten on May 21, 2020 8:38:00 AM

Filmmakers & Videographers in the Field During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Best Practices

Filmmakers & Videographers in the Field During the COVID-19 Pandemicsource: Shutterstock Royalty-free stock photo ID: 1660469317

Front Row remains committed to the success of the entertainment industry and its creators in both good times and bad. With the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, we are now, of course, in bad times, but we thought we could be helpful to those brave filmmakers, film equipment operators and videographers who are still out there working in the field by providing this information.

Questions to ask before heading out on location:

  • Who are you interviewing?
  • Do you need to actually head out/interview a contributor?
  • Can it be done via FaceTime or Skype instead?
  • Are you a risk to anyone?
  • Is anyone nearby more vulnerable/susceptible to the virus?

COVID-19 Information re: Filming

-For any interviews, consider filming a FaceTime (or another video telephony product) instead of in-person interviews. FaceTime interviews can look bad as stand-alone screen-records, but you can be creative shooting these things yourself.

-Clip mics: avoid using these on anyone other than colleagues. It might be best to use a hand mic and/or camera top mic with a wireless transmitter plugged into the bottom for interviews. At the end of the day, take a sponge and wash any mics in hot water and soap.

-STOP sharing earpieces and headphones.

-You or your colleague(s) may wish to use a boom pole from at least a metre of distance.

-Carry latex gloves, masks, hand sanitizer and wipes to clean kit and hands. Pack spares in your kit bag. Latex gloves are the best on location.

CLEAN YOUR KIT

It’s the thing you’re likely touching the most. Clean any camera gear, keyboard, etc. regularly. Carry anti-bacterial wipes to clean equipment in the field. Most importantly, clean equipment at the start and end of the day. Wipe everything.

CLEAN YOUR DEVICES

-Cards in wallet, etc. Avoid touching any coins or cash, if possible.

-Are you using a work car, pool vehicle or hire car? WIPE IT DOWN… spend 20-30 minutes wiping down your vehicle before anyone enters – seats, steering wheel, buttons, handles, etc.

-Keep a log of who has been driving each pool/company vehicle and when/where. If someone picks up the virus, you then know who may need to isolate.

-Think about what you’re touching: e.g., wipe down the bottle of water you’ve just bought. Anything entering your apartment, edit suite or work vehicle should be wiped down.

-You may wish to consider vitamins if you work long and unpredictable hours. The right vitamins can strengthen immune systems. Diet is important, too.

-Be patient. Things will take longer and there will be more to do, but everyone benefits.

HEADING INTO A COVID-19 DANGER ZONE?

-Do you have any underlying health conditions, or problems affecting your immune system? If you do, you may be sensible not to go. You also may not wish to go if any of your immediate family have any of those issues.

-Do your research. Things can change within hours – sudden lockdowns, bans on certain nationalities being able to travel or enter areas, sudden rises in cases, entry and exit restrictions. Have contingency plans for sickness on location, entry/exit plans, etc., and the prospect that you might be stuck there for much longer than planned.

-Protective equipment. Take the basics – gloves, masks, wipes, etc., but plan for the worst. What if you get stuck somewhere? What if you end up sick and having to go to a local health facility (which is likely to be very high risk?). Do you have full protective clothing and perhaps a full face covering (helmet with screen) on standby?

-Wipe down your hotel room. Wipe everything down – light switches, surfaces, toilet seats, etc. You probably don’t want to be eating in the hotel restaurant, drinking in the bar or having a leisurely coffee in the local Starbucks.

RETURNING FROM A COVID-19 DANGER ZONE?

-If returning from a high-risk location – for instance a locked-down town or region, you will probably need to quarantine for 14 days. Have plans for that and take it seriously. Have food and supplies delivered to you. Check and note your temperature and how you’re feeling twice a day. Plan to be able to entertain yourself. Take the isolation seriously and actually isolate. Don’t go to Starbucks, or to see your family. Think about the safety of everyone more vulnerable than you.

-Hot wash all your clothes on return. You may wish to soak/hand wash/scrub some clothing thoroughly. Soak your shoes in boiling hot water and soap. If you suspect something needs to be thrown out, just throw it out.

Good luck and take care,
— The Front Row Team

Disclaimer: This disclaimer provides that the information in this blog post is merely information – not advice. If individuals need medical advice, they should always consult a licensed medical professional. This information was provided by an anonymous working camera journalist, originally posted on the “News And Current Affairs Camera Operators” Facebook group on March 17, 2020.

Citations:

Topics: Film Production, Film Producers, COVID-19

Guidance on Health and Safety for Film & TV Workers during COVID-19

Posted by Grant Patten on May 15, 2020 11:04:26 AM

HEALTH & SAFETY FOR FILM & TV WORKERS DURING COVID-19 (WSPS)

HEALTH & SAFETY FOR FILM & TV WORKERS DURING COVID-19Source: Royalty-free stock photo ID: 1680037777, Shutterstock

The Workplace Safety & Prevention Services (WSPS) has released some helpful guidelines for those in the film, TV and live performance industries who will soon be returning to production work in this COVID-19 environment. WSPS is an Ontario-focused organization, but this information could still be useful to those in other provinces or even the US as well.

Front Row Insurance is merely passing on these WSPS guidelines that might be helpful to some in planning their return to production, but please also consult an employment lawyer, public health and industry associations and government recommendations. The below is for informational purposes only and should not be considered advice.

Controls to consider for returning to production during COVID-19:

The WSPS documents have some helpful points to consider, including…

Are there tasks you can minimize or eliminate? For example, could any scenes that were planned to involve numerous people potentially be cut down to fewer people? Similarly, can scenes that involved people close together potentially be restructured to allow social distancing?

Limit entry points and control who comes onto set, who they speak to, and what they handle.

Have all crewmembers and visitors wash their hands thoroughly with soap and water, or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available, before entering the set, after contact with others, and with surfaces others have touched.

Train crewmembers on COVID-19 transmission points, steps being taken to protect them, and how to protect themselves, including frequent hand sanitizing, and not touching their face.

Is there an opportunity to put barriers in place between crewmembers on set? Consider using floor markings to keep people at a safe distance apart.

Is there an opportunity to improve fresh air intake/air circulation on set?

Increase cleaning frequency – on everything from desks, seats and vehicles to commonly touched surfaces like cameras, computers, microphones, phones, door handles and switches.

Ensure laundering instructions are being followed for wardrobe.

Review sanitation practices for hair and makeup stations to avoid spreading the virus and implement new practices.

Replace buffets with wrapped food items.

Consider having personal protective equipment (PPE) for crewmembers. Some examples of PPE that may be suited to supervisors, production or operations management work include gloves, masks, goggles and/or face shields.

Review your preventative measures on an ongoing basis, and adjust them if they are not working well enough or causing other issues with your work.

COVID Guideline Documents from Workplace Safety & Prevention Services (WSPS):

The above points are selections from the WSPS documents; you are encouraged to download the full documents, linked below:

Download: Workplace Safety & Prevention Services Guidance on Health and Safety for Television Hosts, Technical Crews and other TV and Film Employees during COVID-19 [PDF]

Download: Workplace Safety & Prevention Services Guidance on Health and Safety for Television, Film and Live Performance Sector during COVID-19 [PDF]

NOTE: These documents are intended for informational purposes only to provide an overview of the potential hazards posed in the workplace due to COVID-19. They are not intended as medical advice, to provide a comprehensive risk assessment for all workplaces, or to replace any legislated workplace safety obligations. Due to the ongoing evolution of the situation in Ontario and around the world, these documents may be used as a guide for Employers in addition to guidance delivered by public health authorities such as the World Health Organisation (WHO), Ontario Ministry of Health, Public Health Ontario and the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).” Any use which is made of these documents by any Employer, or any reliance on or decisions to be made based on them, are the responsibility of the Employer.

Good luck and take care,
The Front Row Team

Citations:

https://www.wsps.ca/

Topics: Film Production, Film Producers, Film Production Companies, TV Series, COVID-19

I am renting a car (in Canada) for my production – what do I need?

Posted by Diane Konecny on Feb 20, 2020 9:03:02 AM

I am renting a car (in canada) for my production – what do I need?

Car in film production

Some of the most common questions we get from clients are about vehicles:

  • What coverage do I need? 
  • Do I need to buy anything from the rental company?
  • Can a 20-year-old production assistant (PA) drive the car(s)?

Well, here is what you need to know about renting vehicles when shooting a production in Canada. We will break it down into two sections to explain the basics.

1. DAMAGE to a car you are renting or are contractually required to provide coverage for while being used on production: 

The production policies we provide include coverage if you damage a vehicle while contracted by production. With most insurers, it is called Commercial Vehicle Physical Damage (CVPD)The coverage will have a limit per vehicle, so make sure that if you are renting expensive cars, your limit is high enough to cover any damage that can occur. You will also have to check the Aggregate, which is the most the policy will pay for any one occurrence (in case you damage multiple cars in one accident) and your deductible (the amount you need to pay for the damage before the insurance kicks in). Most policies will set the deductible as a percentage of the damage; for example, 10% with a minimum and maximum amount.

Your rental company will offer you a Collision or Loss Damage Waiver (CDW/ LDW) when renting a vehicle. Typically, these are about $20-$30 per vehicle/day. The CDW/LDW provides coverage for damage to the vehicle. There is no need to purchase this if you have our policies, which include the CVPD coverage. A bit of savings for your budget! However, if you are renting a couple of vehicles for a short period of time and you aren’t so sure about your crew’s driving skills, you may choose to get this coverage from the rental company because the deductible is usually a lower amount. 

NOTE: NOT ALL POLICIES PROVIDED BY OTHER BROKERS WILL INCLUDE THIS COVERAGE. YOU NEED TO CHECK YOUR POLICY TO MAKE SURE YOU HAVE WHAT YOU NEED, OR CONTACT FRONT ROW AND WE CAN OBTAIN PROPER COVERAGE FOR YOU.

2. AUTO LIABILITY covers damage to property or injury to other parties:

Auto liability is the portion of the policy which is regulated by the government and, to make it more complicated, it is individually regulated by each province/territory. Below is a basic breakdown by province.

Will I need to budget for an Auto Liability policy for MY production?

Province:

Coverage provided by:

Do I need to buy Auto Liability?

Newfoundland

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

Nova Scotia

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

PEI

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

New Brunswick

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

Quebec

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

Ontario

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

Manitoba

Government

No, unless you wish to increase the limit provided by the rental company. Coverage is provided for a vehicle when purchasing / renewing the license plate.

Saskatchewan

Government

No, unless you wish to increase the limit provided by the rental company. Coverage is provided for a vehicle when purchasing / renewing the license plate.

Alberta

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

BC

Government

No, unless you wish to increase the limit provided by the rental company. Coverage is provided for a vehicle when purchasing / renewing the license plate.

NWT

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

Yukon

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

Nunavut

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

The above-mentioned coverage outline is meant for informational purposes only and does not represent advice on coverages required. Contact us if you have a specific need or question.

Auto liability is not an option; it needs to be in place for every car driven on public roads. Make sure you have the right coverage for your location and situation so production doesn’t get a ticket, or worse, be held responsible for injury to someone or damage to property.

Hired an intern or co-op student and want them to run errands in your rental car? Is that allowed?

Well, for once it’s not us being the careful ones! You will need to contact your rental company as many will have an age restriction on drivers. Some will restrict it to 21 or 25 years old, so make sure whoever is driving is actually allowed to, as it can nullify your coverage if they aren’t.

Have more questions about auto coverage? Feel free to give any of our Front Row offices a call!

REFER A FRIEND TO FRONT ROW INSURANCE

Based on customer demand, we’ve setup our referral marketing program and if you refer a friend to Front Row, you could win a $15 Amazon eGift Card OR be entered into a random draw to win a $99 Amazon eGift Card! (depending on your province)

RELATED POSTS:

FILM PRODUCTION COMPANIES AND CAMERA CARS: REDUCING THE RISK

FILM PRODUCTION INSURANCE AND RENTING CREW PERSONAL VEHICLES

AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE FOR FILMS

Topics: Entertainment Insurance, Film Production, non-owned auto insurance, automobile insurance for films, Intern Rights

COMMERCIAL GENERAL LIABILITY EXPLAINED | CGL IN FILM PRODUCTION

Posted by Mike Groner on Jul 21, 2016 9:39:57 AM

Commercial General Liability - camera

Commercial General Liability (CGL) in film production, us and canada

Commercial General Liability (CGL) insurance is designed to protect the production company against sums that they may become legally obligated to pay as compensatory damages for bodily injury or property damage to third parties arising out of the production company's operations. It includes the cost of a lawyer to defend you.

This coverage will be required prior to filming on any city or provincial roadways, or any locations/sites requiring filming permits.

Coverage can be amended to include an international indemnification clause, which can provide indemnification for suits brought forth against the production company outside Canada or the USA.

There is limited or no coverage for claims arising out of the use of motor vehicles, aircraft, watercraft or snow machines under a Commercial General Liability policy. Your broker should be advised if you plan to use any of these types of machinery so that your coverage options can be explained to you. Coverage may require the purchase of an additional policy.

To obtain a no-obligation insurance quote for your project, please click on one of the links below:

Short-Term Production Insurance:Coverage can include Commercial General Liability, Film Equipment Insurance, Props/Sets/Wardrobe coverage, Automobile Physical Damage and more.

Film Production Package For a Single Production:Film Production Package for a single production: features, television series, documentaries, and more.

Blanket Annual Production Package:    A convenient way of administering your insurance if you anticipate multiple productions in the next twelve months. This type of policy covers Documentaries, Corporate Videos, Commercials, Educational Films, Music Videos, Shorts, and more.

RELATED LINKS:

Film Insurance 101 & How to Protect Your Film Project

Film Production Insurance: Why it is needed

Pre-Production Insurance

Film Production Insurance

How the Premium is Determined

Short Film Insurance

DigiGear Insurance

Props/Sets/Wardrobe Insurance

E&O Insurance

DICE Insurance

Third Party Property Damage

Crew Vehicles

Umbrella Vs. Excess Liability

Commercial General Liability

Negative Film / Videotape and Faulty Stock

Workers Comp

Cast Insurance

Extra Expense (EE)

Foreign Locations

Claims

Topics: Film Production, Third Party Property Damage

How did what happened to Sarah Jones change the film industry?

Posted by Janet Sellery on Jul 24, 2015 10:43:00 AM

Sarah Jones, Camera Assistanthow did what happened to sarah jones change film industry safety?

On February 20, 2014, Sarah Jones, a 27 year old camera assistant, was tragically killed when Midnight Rider filmmakers criminally trespassed onto live train tracks and began shooting. They did not tell their crew that they had twice been denied permission by CSX to be on the tracks; they also had no safety meeting beforehand and no medic, nor railroad personnel present on set.

Her colleagues have reflected on their role in health and safety and Dave Chameides has written a moving article: Camera Operator After ‘Midnight Rider': “Speak Loudly And Lead By Example”. Here are some excerpts: (The emphasis is mine.)

“As a camera operator with 25 years experience, I understand that it’s part of my job description to make sure that my crew and I remain safe. I’m not infallible and it’s not a job that is mine alone, but at the end of the day I know that if one of my brothers or sisters doesn’t make it home safely, I’m one of the people who dropped the ball.

And I can’t live with that.

More than a year has passed since that fateful day and I find myself thinking of Sarah Jones often. The weight of her death hangs on me, not because I knew her but because I see her on set every day.

On every set I see her because on every set I see young filmmakers hungry to prove themselves, to make their mark, to climb the ladder and live this crazy dream that we all seem so enamored with. And on every set I know that all the Sarahs look to me and others for guidance, safe in the knowledge that if we are not concerned about a particular issue than it must be OK.

But it’s not always OK.

So today I have a request. If you are an experienced industry professional, let your co-workers know that you will point out any safety issues you are aware of. Let them know it’s up to all of us to watch out for each other but that you’ll gladly speak up if they are afraid to. Let them know that set safety is portal to portal, because crew members will lose a life falling asleep at the wheel much more often than they will from of a falling piece of equipment. Let them know that what’s most important in our business is that every member of the crew arrives home safely at the end of every day.

While it’s everyone’s job to address safety concerns, these individuals may not have the confidence to speak up yet, so it falls on us, the veterans, to do that for them and lead by example. We had role models who watched out for us when our careers were just starting out and now it’s our turn to step up, regardless of where we fall on the call sheet. The simple fact that we have years in the trenches gives us the power and the responsibility to speak loudly, speak clearly, and show others that safety comes first and unsafe set practices will not be tolerated.

No one spoke up for Sarah Jones or any of her crew. Someone should have. Starting today, make sure someone does.

For Sarah.

For all the Sarahs.

For all of us.

First filmmaker ever convicted in a case involving on-set death

Director/producer/co-writer Randy Miller pleaded guilty to criminal trespass and involuntary manslaughter and was sentenced to 10 years — two years in jail, eight years probation — plus a $20,000 fine and 360 hours of community service. He also agreed not to serve as director, assistant director or supervisor in charge of safety on any film production for 10 years.

Unit production manager Jay Sedrish and first assistant director Hillary Schwartz were convicted of criminal trespass and involuntary manslaughter. Both were released on 10 years probation.

SEE ALSO:

FILM PRODUCTION INSURANCE AND TRAINS: STAY ON TRACK

The Safety for Sarah movement

Safety For Sarah Logo

Safety for Sarah website

See: ‘Midnight Rider’ Director Randall Miller Issues Statement From Jail – Updated

Janet Sellery
Email:
janet@selleryhealthandsafety.com

Topics: Film Production, TV Series, Public Liability Insurance for Film

Risk Assessments for Film Productions

Posted by David Hamilton on Nov 20, 2012 1:44:00 PM

risk assessments for film productions

Most workplace injuries and diseases can be prevented by identifying and dealing with potential workplace hazards and unsafe work practices.

Q. When do you need to conduct a risk assessment?

A.  For each potentially hazardous activity or situation involved in your production. I.e.,

Conducting FILM PRODUCTION Risk Assessments – 3 basic steps

  1. Identify potential hazards and unsafe work practices
  2. Assess the risks associated with the potential hazards and/or unsafe work practices
  3. Deal with the potential hazards and/or unsafe work practices

Remember: Write your risk assessments down on paper; that way, they can be attached to call sheets and used as a reference in case they are needed at a later date.

A specialized film insurance broker is best able to present the risks associated with your film production to the film insurance underwriter to ensure you receive the best coverage and premium for your production.

Front Row Insurance Brokers are specialized Film Insurance Brokers. Please call us if you have any questions.

The above information is  based on WorkSafe – Focus on Safety – Safe Work Practices for Film and Television Production in B.C. (2001 edition)

Topics: Short Film Insurance, Film Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, Film insurance broker, Film Production, Film Insurance claims, Film Producers, Film Production Companies, Cast Insurance

Focus on Safety to Reduce Film Production Workers Compensation Claims

Posted by David Hamilton on Nov 13, 2012 2:06:00 PM

Hard hats: Workers comp on film sets

Film production health & safety / Workers Comp

Film production companies have an obligation toward their cast and crew members, and must ensure their health and safety.

Production Companies should:

  • Develop and implement health & safety programs
  • Provide first aid kit [Amazon Affiliate Link] and emergency procedures for workers
  • Provide personal protective clothing [Amazon Affiliate Link] and equipment for workers where required by the regulations
  • Hire qualified, competent workers with the proper tickets and qualifications
  • Report all incidents involving medical treatments or lost time from injury or disease to the Workers' Compensation Board (WCB)
  • Investigate all incidents, involving near misses
  • Ensure that cast and crew follow all WCB, municipal, provincial and federal requirements

Cast & Crew should:

  • Wear personal protective clothing [Amazon Affiliate Link] and equipment
  • Alert the supervisor or production company to potential hazards
  • Immediately report work they consider unsafe to their supervisor
  • Follow safe work procedures

Production companies should form a joint health and safety committee that is responsible for identifying potential hazards and/or unsafe work practices and providing suggestions to improve conditions. The committee delegates should ensure that regular workplace inspections are carried out, and confirm that incidents are investigated. Above all, it’s important to consider and respond to heath and safety recommendations from the cast & crew.

examples of task allocations per position are:

Production Manager – Ensure that sets and locations are inspected for potential hazards and that potential hazards are eliminated or controlled.

Production Coordinator – Communicate the distribution of information to cast, crew members and various departments within the production company.

Director – Support ADs in their occupational health & safety responsibilities.

Director of Photography – Prioritize safety when placing cameras & setting up lighting.

Construction Coordinator – Ensure that the construction mill has a first aid [Amazon Affiliate Link] facility stocked with appropriate supplies.

Location Manager – Assess all locations for potential hazards (starting from the time of the initial scout.)

SPFX/Stunt Coordinator – Hold safety talks immediately before any scheduled special effect or stunt.

* The above information is based on WorkSafe – Focus on Safety – Safe Work Practices for Film and Television Production in B.C. (2001 edition) / Amazon Associates Disclosure: Front Row Insurance is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. This post may contain affiliate links. There is no additional cost to you.

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Topics: Film Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, Film insurance broker, Film Production, Film Insurance claims, Film Producers, film insurance premium, Film Production Companies, Workers Compensation