I’m just starting out in my photography business; do I need insurance?

Posted by David McLeish on Feb 27, 2020 11:57:51 AM

I’M JUST STARTING OUT IN MY PHOTOGRAPHY BUSINESS; DO I NEED INSURANCE?

PHOTOGRAPHY BUSINESS INSURANCEShutterstock Royalty-free stock photo ID: 445094317

You might not expect to hear this from an insurance broker, but if you’re wondering whether you need insurance – maybe you don’t!

Many photographers, and most professional photographers, don’t need to wonder: they know, because they are told they must carry insurance. If you apply for a permit to shoot at a Provincial Park or rent gear from a rental house, they won’t issue your permit or release the gear until you provide proof of insurance. In these instances, insurance is a necessity.

If no one is requiring you to carry insurance, but you still think it would be prudent to have, below are some things to consider when deciding whether you need insurance.

What are your total assets?

Insurance is intended to protect you from catastrophic losses. A catastrophic loss is one that you couldn’t possibly recover from without insurance. If your total assets are a camera body and two lenses that altogether cost about $3,000 CAD, replacing them after a theft might be difficult, even painful, but not impossible—not catastrophic. You wouldn’t have to declare bankruptcy, for instance. If you can’t pay for their replacement out of pocket, maybe you put the purchase on a credit card and pay it off over the course of a few months. The interest payments would likely still be less than what you would pay in insurance premiums.

Once you start amassing some serious gear, however, you’ll need to start thinking about insurance. You probably don’t want to carry a $10K balance on a credit card. Perhaps you don’t have a credit card with a $10K limit. At a certain point, the cost of replacing all your assets becomes “catastrophic”. Knowing the replacement cost value of your total assets – and the impact that a worst-case-scenario would have on you or your business – will help you decide when (or at what point) you need insurance.

What are your liability exposures?

The idea of a “catastrophic loss” comes into sharper focus when talking about liability. Here, the values are not in the thousands but in the hundreds of thousands or even millions. Very few people can put a million dollars on a credit card.

If you injure someone with your car, your car insurance pays the damages. If you injure someone as a private citizen and they sue you for negligence, your home insurance may cover damages the courts award against you. But, what if you injure someone while you’re working? You’re not in a car, and your home insurance likely excludes claims arising from “business activities” (note: home insurance policies don’t distinguish between fledgling businesses vs. established businesses—if you’re getting paid to be there, you’re a business).

Liability coverage for your business activities may be obtained through Commercial General Liability (CGL).  If you work in or with the public, or in places where you could conceivably cause bodily injury or property damage to third parties, you have a liability exposure and should consider getting CGL.

What are the deductibles?

Almost every insurance policy has a deductible. A typical commercial property deductible is around $500 to $1,000. A deductible is an amount you’re responsible for paying (for repairs or replacements) before the insurance policy will respond.

Maybe your worst-case-scenario is having your gear stolen while you’re backpacking in Thailand, and you’d be out $5,000. The insurance policy initially costs $500, and the deductible is $1,000. In the event of a total loss, the insurance policy would only save you out-of-pocket costs of $3,500 ($5,000 less the $1,000 deductible, less the $500 premium). Maybe you’d still consider that “catastrophic” and worthwhile insuring. At least: if you know going in what the deductibles are, you won’t be surprised by the actual expense of replacing your gear.

Remember that insurance is intended to cover catastrophic losses. Deductibles are related to this original intent. An insurance company is not a maintenance service you hire to fix every little dent and scratch. Insurance companies do not want to be involved in thousands of small claims, so they impose deductibles to limit the number of claims they have to handle. Check the deductibles before you buy a policy, and think about the deductibles when you are deciding whether or not you need insurance.

What do you expect to get from your insurance?

The biggest misconception people have about insurance comes from the idea of “getting your money’s worth”.  If you think insurance is something that will save you money, or that you should come out ahead of the insurance company, you’re treating insurance like a coupon or a slot machine. Insurance is neither a coupon nor a slot machine!

Don’t pay for insurance expecting huge savings and big winnings. That’s not the point. Insurance is about transferring risk. If a risk to you is so great that it would prevent you from doing what you need to do to grow your business, then you should transfer that risk to an insurance company. Insurance is, essentially, a facilitator of business. It enables people to take certain business risks that – if left to their own devices – they would likely not take, for fear of the consequences.

There are many reasons to get insurance. “Buy as much insurance as you can afford!” is the common refrain from insurance brokerages. But it is also important to understand what insurance is for and how it can work for you, at whatever stage in your career you happen to be.

Consider photography insurance | photography equipment insurance | photography business insurance | photographer liability insurance

So, is insurance right for you? After reading this post, if you think the answer is yes, Front Row’s photography insurance policy is certainly a good option. Many Canadian photographers have come to recognize Front Row as the industry’s best coverage – and rely upon us to protect their valuable camera gear. In case a claim does occur, you can work with your broker to resolve the claim and get compensated for covered losses as quickly as possible.

REFER A FRIEND TO FRONT ROW INSURANCE

Based on customer demand, we’ve setup our referral marketing program and if you refer a friend to Front Row, you could win a $15 Amazon eGift Card OR be entered into a random draw to win a $99 Amazon eGift Card! (depending on your province)

DISCLAIMER: Informational statements regarding insurance coverage are for general description purposes only. These statements do not amend, modify or supplement any insurance policy. Consult the actual policy or your broker for details regarding terms, conditions, coverage, exclusions, products, services and programs which may be available to you. Your eligibility for particular products and services is subject to the final determination of underwriting qualifications and acceptance by the insurance underwriting company providing such products or services. This website does not make any representations that coverage does or does not exist for any particular claim or loss, or type of claim or loss, under any policy. Whether coverage exists or does not exist for any particular claim or loss under any policy depends on the facts and circumstances involved in the claim or loss and all applicable policy wording.

 

RELATED POSTS:

5 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT MAKING A PHOTOGRAPHY INSURANCE CLAIM

PHOTO INSURANCE CLAIMS

THEFT FROM VEHICLE: PHOTOGRAPHY INSURANCE EXPLAINED

Topics: photography insurance

I am renting a car (in Canada) for my production – what do I need?

Posted by Diane Konecny on Feb 20, 2020 9:03:02 AM

I am renting a car (in canada) for my production – what do I need?

Car in film production

Some of the most common questions we get from clients are about vehicles:

  • What coverage do I need? 
  • Do I need to buy anything from the rental company?
  • Can a 20-year-old production assistant (PA) drive the car(s)?

Well, here is what you need to know about renting vehicles when shooting a production in Canada. We will break it down into two sections to explain the basics.

1. DAMAGE to a car you are renting or are contractually required to provide coverage for while being used on production: 

The production policies we provide include coverage if you damage a vehicle while contracted by production. With most insurers, it is called Commercial Vehicle Physical Damage (CVPD)The coverage will have a limit per vehicle, so make sure that if you are renting expensive cars, your limit is high enough to cover any damage that can occur. You will also have to check the Aggregate, which is the most the policy will pay for any one occurrence (in case you damage multiple cars in one accident) and your deductible (the amount you need to pay for the damage before the insurance kicks in). Most policies will set the deductible as a percentage of the damage; for example, 10% with a minimum and maximum amount.

Your rental company will offer you a Collision or Loss Damage Waiver (CDW/ LDW) when renting a vehicle. Typically, these are about $20-$30 per vehicle/day. The CDW/LDW provides coverage for damage to the vehicle. There is no need to purchase this if you have our policies, which include the CVPD coverage. A bit of savings for your budget! However, if you are renting a couple of vehicles for a short period of time and you aren’t so sure about your crew’s driving skills, you may choose to get this coverage from the rental company because the deductible is usually a lower amount. 

NOTE: NOT ALL POLICIES PROVIDED BY OTHER BROKERS WILL INCLUDE THIS COVERAGE. YOU NEED TO CHECK YOUR POLICY TO MAKE SURE YOU HAVE WHAT YOU NEED, OR CONTACT FRONT ROW AND WE CAN OBTAIN PROPER COVERAGE FOR YOU.

2. AUTO LIABILITY covers damage to property or injury to other parties:

Auto liability is the portion of the policy which is regulated by the government and, to make it more complicated, it is individually regulated by each province/territory. Below is a basic breakdown by province.

Will I need to budget for an Auto Liability policy for MY production?

Province:

Coverage provided by:

Do I need to buy Auto Liability?

Newfoundland

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

Nova Scotia

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

PEI

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

New Brunswick

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

Quebec

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

Ontario

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

Manitoba

Government

No, unless you wish to increase the limit provided by the rental company. Coverage is provided for a vehicle when purchasing / renewing the license plate.

Saskatchewan

Government

No, unless you wish to increase the limit provided by the rental company. Coverage is provided for a vehicle when purchasing / renewing the license plate.

Alberta

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

BC

Government

No, unless you wish to increase the limit provided by the rental company. Coverage is provided for a vehicle when purchasing / renewing the license plate.

NWT

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

Yukon

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

Nunavut

Private insurers

Yes, if contracting a vehicle for more than 30 consecutive days.

The above-mentioned coverage outline is meant for informational purposes only and does not represent advice on coverages required. Contact us if you have a specific need or question.

Auto liability is not an option; it needs to be in place for every car driven on public roads. Make sure you have the right coverage for your location and situation so production doesn’t get a ticket, or worse, be held responsible for injury to someone or damage to property.

Hired an intern or co-op student and want them to run errands in your rental car? Is that allowed?

Well, for once it’s not us being the careful ones! You will need to contact your rental company as many will have an age restriction on drivers. Some will restrict it to 21 or 25 years old, so make sure whoever is driving is actually allowed to, as it can nullify your coverage if they aren’t.

Have more questions about auto coverage? Feel free to give any of our Front Row offices a call!

REFER A FRIEND TO FRONT ROW INSURANCE

Based on customer demand, we’ve setup our referral marketing program and if you refer a friend to Front Row, you could win a $15 Amazon eGift Card OR be entered into a random draw to win a $99 Amazon eGift Card! (depending on your province)

RELATED POSTS:

FILM PRODUCTION COMPANIES AND CAMERA CARS: REDUCING THE RISK

FILM PRODUCTION INSURANCE AND RENTING CREW PERSONAL VEHICLES

AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE FOR FILMS

Topics: Entertainment Insurance, Film Production, Film Production Vehicle Insurance, non-owned auto insurance, automobile insurance for films, Intern Rights

Announcement on New Hire Leanne Savoie – David Hamilton CEO

Posted by David Hamilton on Feb 19, 2020 6:30:31 AM

Announcement – David Hamilton CEO

LEANNE SAVOIE

Leanne Savoie

Front Row is pleased to announce Leanne Hussey Savoie has joined the Vancouver office as a Vice President effective February 18, 2020.

Leanne obtained her license as a Registered Insurance Broker in Ontario in 1990, attained her Canadian Accredited Insurance Broker designation in 1995 and her Chartered Insurance Professional designation in 2006. Before joining Front Row, she worked at HUB International for ~2 years as an Entertainment Account Manager focusing on Film, TV & Multimedia insurance risks.

Leanne also worked at Aon/Ruben-Winkler for 10 years, alongside Darlene, specializing in Entertainment Insurance and at First Durham Insurance & Financial for 4 years as a Commercial Lines Account Executive.

Leanne’s staff page

Leanne will report to Meghan Stickney. She can be reached at: Leanne@frontrowinsurance.com
Please join me in welcoming Leanne to the Front Row crew!

David Hamilton
CEO

Announcement on New Hire Alyson Forster – David Hamilton CEO

Posted by David Hamilton on Feb 14, 2020 6:14:22 AM

Announcement – David Hamilton CEO

Alyson Forster

Alyson Forster

Front Row is pleased to announce Alyson Forster has joined our LA office as an account executive.

Alyson is an experienced broker (California property & casualty license). She worked at American Entertainment Insurance Services for ~2 years before joining Front Row. She specialized in: short shoots, events and DICE clients.

Alyson is gifted at connecting with entertainment clients: she is knowledgeable about production and passionate about film and TV. She is service-oriented and quality-focused with a demonstrated history of success.

Alyson’s staff page

We’re confident that Alyson will add a lot of value to the Front Row Insurance team and we look forward to her contributions. Please join me in welcoming her to our crew!

How does an E&O clearance process protect against plagiarism claims?

Posted by Remy Khouzam on Feb 3, 2020 8:25:33 AM

How does an E&O clearance process protect against plagiarism claims?

E&O insurance film | errors and omissions insurance film:


Remy Khouzam (Lawyer)
: When discussing a project, a lawyer and his client (the producer) will have to look at various things regarding the nature of the project itself; for example:

  • Is it an original project?
  • Is it a project adapted from previous work?
  • Who collaborated on these projects?

The idea is: you can work on these things based on warranties and representations that are in the contract(s) of your various project contributors that will basically represent that their contribution is original and wasn’t taken from a third-party source. So, there’s no consent necessary and they own all the rights to grant them to the producer. So, that’s basically the work that is done and the sort of guarantees you need in order to obtain E&O coverage.

Related:

About: Lussier & Khouzam is a Canadian law firm specialized in Arts and Entertainment law. Visit their website at https://lussierkhouzam.com/.

Topics: E&O Insurance

Why do we need to answer ALL the questions on an E&O application?

Posted by Steve Fraser on Jan 27, 2020 10:48:53 AM

Why do we need to answer ALL the questions on an E&O application?

what are lawyers looking for in the responses?

E&O INSURANCE FILM | ERRORS AND OMISSIONS INSURANCE FILM:


Steve Fraser (Lawyer)
: ALL the questions on an E&O application should be answered because they all reflect something that the insurer needs to know, but most of all, it’s an administrative thing. If you don’t answer all the questions, and you’re in a hurry, it’ll slow down the process.

E&O can be very easy to obtain if you answer all the questions as completely as you can and that also means you can add to the application. Just because the application doesn’t include a line that says “this will be obtained…”, you can actually write that in. That’s probably one of the biggest things that producers should pick up: do a FULL application but also – if you’re concerned about how an answer looks – add information. You can either write it onto the application itself, or you can do it as an addition to the application.

When some of the projects are complicated like, for example, treaty co-productions or just co-productions in general and there’s more than one person who is Named Insured, put it on a separate sheet. It is so much easier to have it all in one place than to have to go chasing after it. It’s better for you and for everybody involved in the E&O insurance process.

Related:

About: Stephen "Steve" Fraser is an international entertainment business and legal affairs lawyer in the film and television industries with co-production, financing and distribution experience.

Topics: Entertainment Insurance, E&O Insurance, Film Production Companies

Script Clearance and Title Search Report Cost

Posted by Anne Marie Murphy on Jan 20, 2020 8:31:01 AM

SCRIPT CLEARANCE and TITLE SEARCH REPORT COST

SCRIPT CLEARANCE REPORT COST

SCRIPT CLEARANCE REPORT COST

Script clearance reports give you a detailed list of all the story elements in your project that might cause problems in any of these categories:

A "clearance" or "script clearance" company will read the script and make a list ("clearance report") of all the places in it where there could be legal trouble. Then, they'll research all those items and present you with notes on what looks safe ("clear") to use and what might get you into some problems ("not clear"). Look for a company that will suggest solutions as well, among them providing contact information for rights holders and presenting you with "clear" alternatives for scripted items that are problematic.

As in most industries, the faster you need the work done, the more it will cost. Most script clearance companies have a range of turnaround options for a feature film report, ranging from a few days to a few weeks. You can expect to pay anywhere from $1000 to $3000 (Canadian dollars) for the first full report on a feature film script, depending on the turnaround you need and the company you hire. [U.S. title search prices range from $275-$1250.]

Additional billing often follows when more requests come from both the art department (names to use on signage and props) and the story department (revised drafts and/or one-off name changes to be checked).  Script clearance companies bill in different ways for that follow-up work (by the hour, by the item), so consult with them regarding procedures to find the best way forward for the way you work. 

A theatrical feature that is heavy on art department requests + has many rewrites that need review can run up a bill of well over $5000 for clearance work.

Clearance reports for a TV series are not typically prepared in the same short time period as they are for a feature film report (during a weeks-long shoot).  A television series can have a production schedule that stretches for many months and the script clearance reports will be generated when each episode goes into production. Here too, there can be many sets of revisions and many art department requests.  The art department clearances for episodic series work can be much heavier in the first season of the show when set dressing is going up for the first time.

The cost for these series reports is usually billed per episode (rather than for a full season) and vary depending on the length of the script. You might pay $100 for a report on a short 10-page web series or kids' animated show, but on the other end of the spectrum, a one-hour episode script might run you closer to $1000. Another added cost for series work is if you need your reports done faster than the usual promised turnaround times; that can add 50% to the price. This sometimes comes into play with web series projects that might not be aware of the E&O requirement for script clearance reports until just before they start shooting.

There are several script clearance companies based in Canada and plenty in the U.S., where the reports were first developed in the early 1950s. You'll have plenty of options for finding a company that offers what you need. Most clearance companies have a rate sheet they'll share upon request while others  will only quote on a per-project basis. You'll obviously want a company that has a good track record over a long period of time and probably one that has its own E&O coverage.

Another thing to ask for if your project will be on a streaming service is, "have you worked already for [Netflix, Apple TV, Hulu, etc.]?" Some of those companies have a long-ish vetting process for service providers with whom they are unfamiliar. That's something to keep in mind.

Sometimes a project doesn't need an entire script "cleared" but instead has just a few names that need to be researched. Depending on the company, this type of request is billed at either an hourly or a per-item rate. This approach can work well for a cash-strapped project that has experienced production personnel who can read the script and send the notes needed for the clearance house to do their work. Assuming that the art department personnel are well aware of the intellectual property issues involved in dressing a set, sending only a short list of character names out for clearances can be an excellent low-budget solution.

TITLE SEARCH REPORT COST

Pricing on title search reports is a lot less complicated than for script clearances. Simply stated: for any given title, you'll need to select the turnaround time and the geographic scope of the report. Again, the faster you need the work done, the more it will cost. Unlike a script clearance report – in which the scope of the search is determined by the geographic setting of the story – the production's distribution plan dictates the scope of the title search.

If production counsel feels strongly that the broadest possible scope is needed, then that will add to the cost of the report. The broader the scope, the more sources are consulted and the cost increases with additional research time involved. 

A title search report of limited scope at a longer turnaround time might come in at less than $300. However, once you add in a speedier delivery and your lawyer or broker's insistence on a more robust geographic scope, a title search report can cost upward of $3000.

There are even more options for providers of title search reports in North America than there are for script clearance reports, so shopping around would be wise. When in doubt, the wisest route is often picking the company that comes best recommended to you. As with any professional service provider, a referral from a company that has a long and solid track record with another company is invaluable.

Another difference between title search reports and script clearance reports is the opinion factor. Good clearance reports offer plenty of opinions about what is and is not "clear." Title searches, on the other hand, have "just the facts, ma'am." The research company is not authorized to provide you an opinion on whether the title is clear for use. That has to come from a lawyer.

SCRIPT CLEARANCE RESEARCHER / TITLE SEARCH COMPANY

Eastern Script specializes in providing research services for the entertainment industry, including script clearances and title searches. Visit their website here: https://www.easternscript.com/

Guest post by Anne Marie Murphy
amm@easternscript.com
(844) 842-3999

Related Posts:

Topics: Entertainment Insurance, E&O Insurance, Title reports, Script Clearance reports

Legal Expense Insurance

Posted by Grant Patten on Jan 13, 2020 8:26:34 AM

Legal Expense Insurance

Legal Expense Insurance

With legal expense insurance, your legal risks are well managed.

We know you’re busy. You’re running your business and working hard at it. But whenever you have an unforeseen legal issue, we know it means more time and work for you – and it takes you away from doing what you love.

Front Row Insurance and DAS have partnered to save you time and effort by offering the option of legal expense insurance (LEI) as a part of your Front Row policy.

How would LEI help you and your business?

A legal expense insurance policy:

  • provides you with financial coverage for a variety of potential legal events,
  • empowers you to pursue or defend your legal rights, and
  • provides you with unlimited access to a general Legal Helpline

Legal expense insurance saves you time and money by helping to:

Defend or pursue your legal rights, such as:

  • Employment Disputes: If you face legal action from an employee or ex-employee
  • Legal Defence: If your business faces criminal charges, a police investigation or an occupational health and safety investigation
  • Contract Disputes and Debt Recovery: If you face a dispute with a client or supplier in regards to a breach of contract or failure to pay an amount owed
  • Statutory Licence Protection: If your business faces a suspension, alteration or cancellation of its business licence
  • Property Protection: If there is trespass or legal nuisance to your business property
  • Bodily Injury: If you or one of your employees is injured on the job as a result of someone else’s negligence
  • Tax Protection: If you face an audit or wish to appeal a decision from the CRA

With policy limits of $100,000 per claim and $500,000 in total per policy year, DAS provides you the financial security to continue your legal action over time and against well-funded foes.

You also receive unlimited access to the DAS Legal Helpline

You will not need to search the internet or pay out of pocket for answers and assistance to your legal questions or issues. Legal information is provided, even if the issue or question is not covered by the policy. We make it easy for you as our Helpline lawyers are available:

  • 8:00 a.m. to midnight local time
  • 24/7 in an emergency situation

To learn more, please contact us.

Related Posts:


About: DAS Legal Protection Inc. is the Canadian market leader and managing general agent specializing exclusively in Legal Expense Insurance. Working with brokers and corporate partners, we create access to justice solutions so Canadian individuals, families, and business owners can exercise their rights, preserve their budget, and be confident when facing an unforeseen legal event. DAS Legal Expense Insurance policies are underwritten by Temple Insurance Company, and both companies are members of Munich Re (Group). To learn more, please visit www.das.ca.

Topics: Entertainment Insurance, Workers Compensation, workplace insurance, legal expense

Why are certain questions asked on an E&O application?

Posted by Steve Fraser on Jan 8, 2020 10:50:01 AM

Why are certain questions asked on an E&O application?

what are lawyers looking for in the responses?

E&O INSURANCE FILM | ERRORS AND OMISSIONS INSURANCE FILM:


Steve Fraser (Lawyer)
: Certain questions are asked on an E&O insurance application to help the insurance company or their counsel to gauge whether the production may be riskier than others. On the one hand, it’s a risk assessment but on the other hand, it’s also a way to check to make sure that the way that they’ve answered the question reflects that they’re aware of what the clearance procedures are and that they will follow them.

Sometimes, the entertainment lawyer who is clearance counsel for the production also signs the application or there’s a place where that lawyer has to acknowledge that they’ve seen the application. But, no surprise, it’s just a way to figure out who might think that they don’t need to comply with some of the clearance questions.

So, one of the E&O application questions is: “Is there a possibility that a living person could claim (without regard to the merits of such claim) to be identifiable in the Insured Production, whether or not that person’s name or likeness is used in it or whether or not the Insured purports it to be fictional? If “yes” has a release been obtained from such person?”

Well, if there is a possibility of something like that, we want to know about it upfront but also, that question tends to segue into: “are you getting releases? Is production doing what it needs to do to make sure that the folks who are appearing on screen (usually documentary, but also for dramas where you need performer agreements) are following what production says they will follow?"

Related:

About: Stephen "Steve" Fraser is an international entertainment business and legal affairs lawyer in the film and television industries with co-production, financing and distribution experience.

Topics: Entertainment Insurance, E&O Insurance, Title reports, Film Production Companies

How can a film producer protect themselves from an E&O claim?

Posted by Steve Fraser on Jan 6, 2020 8:53:11 AM

How can a film producer protect themselves from an E&O claim?

FOLLOW THE E&O CLEARANCE PROCEDURES

E&O INSURANCE FILM | ERRORS AND OMISSIONS INSURANCE FILM:


Steve Fraser (Lawyer)
: A film producer can protect himself, herself or itself (because most producers incorporate) by following the clearance procedures that are included with your E&O application and/or E&O policy.

So, get yourself an entertainment lawyer, take a look at those clearance procedures, make sure you’re following them and you will avoid claims forever. The other thing you should do is get friendly with your insurance broker – they’re very helpful.

Related:

About: Stephen "Steve" Fraser is an international entertainment business and legal affairs lawyer in the film and television industries with co-production, financing and distribution experience.

Topics: Entertainment Insurance, Film insurance broker, E&O Insurance, Title reports