Protect your camera from overheating / protect your camera in the heat

Posted by Grant Patten on Jun 2, 2020 6:54:41 AM

How to protect your camera from overheating

Protect your camera from overheating / protect your camera in the heatSource: Royalty-free stock photo ID: 1638413680, Shutterstock

It’s true – if you’re a professional photographer who can afford to purchase the highest quality camera bodies, they should be able to withstand the heat without any issues, but there are still some best practices that you should keep in mind when shooting in hot weather. Let’s review those in this article…

Tips to protect your camera from overheating / protecting your camera in the heat / shooting in high temperatures

First, check with your camera’s manufacturer to find out the operating temperature of the camera. Avoid taking the camera into environments that will likely exceed this temperature.

Avoid condensation issues by allowing your camera and other equipment to warm up gradually before exposing them to a hot environment. Avoid rapid changes in temperature; limit the number of transitions from warm to cold, and vice versa. For certain camera models, you can even find anti-fog eyepieces [Amazon Link] that reduce condensation.

Consider placing your camera body and lenses in airtight, sealable bags with silica gel packets [Amazon Link] inside before exposing them to heat. An airtight camera case such as the Pelican Small DSLR Camera Case [Amazon Link] would also do the trick.

If you have a camera with an articulating LCD screen, tilt the screen away from the camera body. If you leave the LCD pressed up against the body, this will increase the amount of heat on the camera and can lead to overheating.

Consider leaving your camera’s battery door open, assuming the batteries are adequately snug inside. The door usually doesn’t have to be closed to use the camera. This practice can help dissipate heat.

If possible, use external batteries. If you’re shooting and have a power outlet nearby (or one that could be accessed with extension cords), there are dummy battery adapters that could be used. The dummy battery rests in the camera, which only has a power cord inside, and not an actual battery.

Consider covering any large black surfaces of your camera with aluminized heat shield tape [Amazon Link]. This should reflect the majority of radiant heat. Similarly, placing a white towel or rag over the camera body and lens should reflect sun and keep the camera from heating up too much. Just drape the towel; do not wrap the camera, as you want some air to be able to flow around it.

Consider getting a Lighting Reflector and Stand Kit [Amazon Link]; leave the camera under the reflector with the silver side up. Similarly, you could place a mini umbrella [Amazon Link] over the camera.

Front Row Photography: E-Z UP portable tentConsider using a portable tent such as the one from E-Z UP [Amazon Link]; keep yourself and your photo gear under this for the majority of the shoot and you’ll avoid overheating issues.

Cordless fans powered by lithium-ion batteries [Amazon Link] can help cool down your photography gear in hot environments.

Look at upgrading your memory card(s) – especially if they’re old – to ensure they’re efficient; your camera will then not build up as much internal heat while you shoot.

Device-intensive features such as Live View and HD video recording will generate heat; therefore, don’t use them in the heat unless truly necessary.

If feasible, have a backup camera body and rotate between the two bodies.

Best cameras for hot weather photography / warm weather photography / hot weather photography

Always favour weather sealed cameras. Weather sealing a camera refers to having rubber gaskets in the seams to keep the elements from the camera’s internals. However, if the lens doesn't have weather sealing also, elements can still enter into the camera through the lens mount.

Many cameras are already weather sealed, but don’t assume that your camera is necessarily weather sealed just because it’s a new model. Check with the camera manufacturer to verify.

GoPro is likely the first brand that most people consider when thinking about shooting in harsh, hot climates, and certainly they have some good options, such as the GoPro HERO7 Action Camera. [Amazon Link] However, the image quality on GoPros often isn’t the greatest and they’re generally better for videography than photography.

Point-and-shoot cameras are fine for daytime shooting in hot weather, but you’ll want a basic DSLR & kit lens for any nighttime, low light performance.

Some good DSLRs to consider for hot weather photography:

The Nikon D850 DSLR [Amazon Link] is big and bulky; not much else can match its combination of speed, image quality, and ruggedness.

The Olympus TG-6 [Amazon Link] is branded as “Tough” because it can handle shooting in most harsh environments. It is waterproof, dustproof, shockproof, crushproof, and freezeproof.

Front Row Photography: PENTAX K-70Pentax is known for having excellent weather sealing. The Pentax K-70 Black [Amazon Link] is fully weather sealed and has largely positive reviews on Amazon. This camera is built specifically for outdoor shooting. Another solid, less expensive option from this brand is the Pentax K-30 Weather-Sealed 16 MP CMOS Digital SLR [Amazon Link], which is also weather sealed and built for shooting outdoors.

The Canon 1DX Mark II [Amazon Link] is built for abuse but is also quite expensive. Only professional photographers will want to consider this one.

Other camera accessories to help prevent overheating:

Place a UV filter on your lenses; more specifically, a UV-Haze filter [Amazon Link] can help cut through moderate smoke/particles that can be in the air on especially hot days.

You could place cold gel packs [Amazon Link] on your camera body/other photography equipment to help cool down gear.

Similarly, thermal paste and thermal pads [Amazon Links] can be effective at preventing overheating on many electronics by ensuring that heat generated from the CPU is dissipated.

Generally, carbon fiber tripods [Amazon Link] do better in hot weather than regular tripods.

Have some camera wipes [Amazon Link] on hand to dry off the camera.

Some Hot Weather Photographs | Hot Weather Photography | Warm Weather Photography | Summer Photography

Maybe one of these pictures can inspire you to do some hot weather photography of your own:

Front Row Photography: Beautiful sunset in the mountain landscapes

Beautiful sunset in the mountain landscapes, reflection of sky, majestic sundown mount.
Shutterstock: Royalty-free stock photo ID: 1200723487

Front Row Photography: Woman yoga practice in hot spring water area

Woman yoga practice in hot spring water area with natural hot stream water.
Shutterstock: Royalty-free stock photo ID: 1007762446

Front Row Photography: Hot weather and no rain

Hot weather and no rain makes drought and fires.
Shutterstock: Royalty-free stock photo ID: 190813220

Get Photography Insurance | Insurance for photographers | Photographer Insurance | Fire Photography Insurance

Following these tips will, hopefully, allow you to avoid hot weather-related damage to your photography gear. However, just in case something like that does happen, you will want to have photography insurance in place to help cover the cost of repair/replacement.

Front Row’s insurance for photographers is a good option for insuring your photo gear. You can get a quote and purchase a policy online in just five minutes, or read more about the coverages available on the photography insurance site.

Note: if you are interested in doing any kind of fire photography or photography in and around pyrotechnics, that is not automatically covered and will require special underwriting authorization. Contact us to discuss the details.

Refer a Friend to Front Row Insurance

Based on customer demand, we’ve setup our referral marketing program and if you refer a friend to Front Row, you could win a $15 Amazon eGift Card OR be entered into a random draw to win a $99 Amazon eGift Card! (depending on your province)

 

Related posts:

10 tips to protect your camera at the beach / protect camera from sand

What to Know About Rain Photography: Protecting Your Camera in Rain

Protecting Your Camera Lens(es)

Theft from Vehicle: Photography Insurance

DISCLAIMER: Informational statements regarding insurance coverage are for general description purposes only. These statements do not amend, modify or supplement any insurance policy. Consult the actual policy or your broker for details regarding terms, conditions, coverage, exclusions, products, services and programs which may be available to you. Your eligibility for particular products and services is subject to the final determination of underwriting qualifications and acceptance by the insurance underwriting company providing such products or services. This website does not make any representations that coverage does or does not exist for any particular claim or loss, or type of claim or loss, under any policy. Whether coverage exists or does not exist for any particular claim or loss under any policy depends on the facts and circumstances involved in the claim or loss and all applicable policy wording.

Amazon Associates Disclosure: Front Row Insurance is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon. This post may contain affiliate links. There is no additional cost to you.

Citations:

https://blog.photoshelter.com/2010/08/keeping-your-camera-gear-safe-in-the-heat/
https://gimbalgarage.com/stop-your-sony-a6300-overheating/

Topics: photography insurance

Photographers, are YOU prepared with cyber insurance if you get “brandjacked”?

Posted by Grant Patten on May 26, 2020 8:07:38 AM

ARE YOU PREPARED WITH CYBER INSURANCE IF YOU GET “BRANDJACKED”?

Front Row cyber insurance: brandjacking

Don’t think a cyber hack could happen to your photography business? Well, think again! Just look at the below real-life examples of photography business hacks to see how real this threat is:

Australian photography company – MailChimp account hacked

An Australian photography company’s MailChimp account was hacked in 2018. The hacker imported their spam list and proceeded to email fake invoices from the commandeered account. This is known as “brandjacking”, whereby a hacker assumes the online identity of a brand in order to leverage that business's brand equity for nefarious purposes.

The hacker sent hundreds of thousands of fake invoices to emails around the world, resulting in an unfortunate and embarrassing situation for this photography business. Some consumers who received the fake invoices even reported the business to the Communications & Media Authority.

Hopefully the business had cyber insurance. If they did, they would be able to cover the cost of a forensic investigation to determine how the hack occurred.

Australian photographer hit with ransomware

In 2017, another Australian photographer was hacked – this time hit with ransomware on his computer. He posted about his ordeal on the Digital Photography Review forum, writing, “I have been infected with some sort of virus that has encoded files on my computer – mainly my RAW photo files – and has encrypted them, so now I can't use them.”

Ransom note: Australian photographer hit with ransomwareThe hacker was demanding payment of 0.5 Bitcoin to access a “Decryptor” that would, ostensibly, unlock the photographer’s RAW photo files.

0.5 Bitcoin in Australian dollars (at the time of this writing) = $5,886. Certainly not inexpensive, but the reality is that – once hit with ransomware – you usually have a stark choice between either paying the ransom, or losing your files.

With cyber risk insurance in place, the included ransomware coverage would cover costs associated with payments to those who threaten to disclose sensitive information.

London-based food photographer hacked

A London UK-based food photographer had his YouTube channel hacked in 2020, even though he had two-step authentication enabled! As he was using Google AdSense to monetize his YouTube videos, this potentially endangered his income.

The photographer theorizes that it was likely an email phishing scam that he fell for because he receives “100-200 messages a day.”

However, with cyber insurance in place, he wouldn’t have to theorize – the insurance would cover the cost of a forensic investigation to determine how, exactly, this happened. Cyber insurance would also include business interruption to cover lost income from the AdSense account.

Swiss photographer Facebook Page hack

In 2019, a popular Swiss photographer’s Facebook Page was hacked and used to scam hundreds of people! He was eventually able to regain access to his Page, but not before many of his followers were tricked out of their hard-earned money. When something like this happens, it is entirely conceivable that the scammed individuals may decide to sue for damages.

Cyber liability insurance includes first-party and third-party cyber liability coverage. The third-party coverage would be particularly useful in this case, as it covers against lawsuits from third parties (e.g., customers) due to a cyber attack on a business.

Portland-based photo business websites hacked

A Portland-based photographer tried logging into her business WordPress websites one day in 2017, only to realize that they had been hacked.

The hacker had sent 60,000 emails from the photographer’s email address.

The photographer called a website security firm to help her resolve the issue. The security firm quoted her at $275 USD per month to help her. With cyber insurance in place, you wouldn’t have to frantically call up random security firms you find on Google. You would simply file a claim and the forensic investigation process would then kickoff.

Ultimately, we’re not sure if any of the above-mentioned photography businesses had cyber liability insurance in place, but it certainly would have been advisable to have such a policy, in all cases.

WHAT IS CYBER INSURANCE | CYBER LIABILITY INSURANCE | CYBER SECURITY INSURANCE | CYBER RISK INSURANCE ?

Cyber hack insurance for photographers is designed to protect them from certain losses associated with data breaches and hacks. After a hack, there are costs you will likely incur, including (but not limited to):

  • notifying customers that their information has been stolen
  • paying to restore or recover the stolen data
  • paying to conduct an investigation to determine what happened
  • losing money from business interruption
  • potentially having to reshoot many photos since they’re now under the control of hackers

SO, HOW CAN CYBER HACK INSURANCE HELP?

Hack insurance can help with expenses associated with managing a hack, such as incident response and data recovery expenses.

PROTECT your data: If you’re a photographer, the second-most important object you own, next to your camera, is likely your computer. Your computer/laptop is, no doubt, essential to your photography business operations.

Not only is your work stored on your computer, you may also have accounting and client personal information on there. If you suffer a hack, your insurance can help you manage the costs associated with the loss. Front Row's cyber hack insurance policy starts at just $300 CAD annually and includes comprehensive cyber coverage with limit options up to $1,000,000.

90% of small businesses in Canada do not have Cyber Insurance: take a few minutes to protect your photography business that has taken you so long to establish.

Get a Quote Online In 2 Mins.

 

Citations:

https://procounter.com.au/2018/04/11/sydney-photographer-hacked-and-brandjacked/
https://fstoppers.com/originals/i-had-my-youtube-channel-stolen-454286
https://www.nationalphotographersinsurance.com/single-post/2017/11/15/Cyber-Hack---Photography-Professional
https://petapixel.com/2019/10/10/my-facebook-photography-page-was-hacked-and-used-to-scam-hundreds-of-people/

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/4153904

DISCLAIMER: Informational statements regarding insurance coverage are for general description purposes only. These statements do not amend, modify or supplement any insurance policy. Consult the actual policy or your broker for details regarding terms, conditions, coverage, exclusions, products, services and programs which may be available to you. Your eligibility for particular products and services is subject to the final determination of underwriting qualifications and acceptance by the insurance underwriting company providing such products or services. This website does not make any representations that coverage does or does not exist for any particular claim or loss, or type of claim or loss, under any policy. Whether coverage exists or does not exist for any particular claim or loss under any policy depends on the facts and circumstances involved in the claim or loss and all applicable policy wording.

Topics: photography insurance, Cyber Insurance

Underwater photography / In-water photography camera protection tips

Posted by Grant Patten on May 21, 2020 8:17:40 AM

Underwater photography / In-water photography camera protection tips

Underwater photography / In-water photography camera protection tipsSource: Royalty-free stock photo ID: 386799562, Shutterstock

Let’s face it – photographing underwater is an inherently precarious situation, but it can also result in some amazing imagery, so the reward can sometimes outweigh the risk. And photographers will continue doing underwater photography as long as this prospect exists, so let’s review some ways that photographers can protect their valuable gear while underwater.

Note: underwater photography is not automatically covered and requires special underwriting authorization (but coverage is available). Contact us for more information.

Tips on protecting your camera underwater / underwater photography

Consider using a dome cover for your camera such as the Vbestlife Underwater Diving Dome [Amazon Link]; these waterproof domes lengthen the distance between the lens and water by ~30mm, with a wide angle to make the picture clearer.

Get a water resistant hard case for your memory cards, such as the Honsky Aluminum Water Resistant Memory Card Carrying Case [Amazon Link]. A water resistant phone case would also be an option for holding the memory cards, such as the JOTO Universal Waterproof Pouch [Amazon Link].

Get a waterproof camera strap to attach to your underwater camera and/or housing so that your camera doesn’t float away from you! One example of such a product is the Float Foam Wrist Strap JJC Waterproof Camera Floating Hand Strap [Amazon Link].

DSLR Camera Universal Waterproof Underwater PouchThere are underwater camera bags; most are for DSLR cameras. The DSLR Camera Universal Waterproof Underwater Pouch [Amazon Link] looks like a decent option. It is waterproof down to 20 meters deep.

Get a dry bag that fits all your gear or even a whole backpack. Something like the Boundless Voyage TPU Waterproof Bag [Amazon Link] should work. It is large enough to carry most photography equipment and is 100% waterproof.

Try to minimize contact with the reef when shooting. Many underwater photographers carry a simple aluminum rod [Amazon Link] that also doubles as a pointing device for this purpose.

Underwater camera housings – how to know they are adequate?

UNDERWATER CAMERA HOUSINGIt’s true – there’s something scary about trusting a piece of plastic to protect $1,000 (or much more) worth of equipment from near certain death by drowning. This technique is not recommended for amateur photographers as it is a delicate operation, but most professional photographers shooting underwater will use DSLRs in underwater housings.

Don’t trust a simple plastic bag to protect your camera underwater, especially if it’s an expensive DSLR. However, keep in mind that high quality DSLR housings can sometimes cost more than the camera!

To be as safe as possible, first, you’ll want to purchase a housing that was specifically designed for your camera, if available. The Sony a6000, for example, has the Andoer MEIKON SY-13 40m/130ft Underwater Waterproof Camera Housing [Amazon Link]. The Olympus TG6 has the Olympus PT-059 Underwater Housing [Amazon Link], and so on…

Testing underwater camera housings / underwater camera housing test

You should always test your housing before every use. Always be sure to read and adhere to the special manufacturer directions before using your housing (prior to submerging the camera/housing, be sure of limits on depth of operations).

You can also get a vacuum device such as the Backscatter AirLock Vacuum System with Manual Valve to verify that your housing is free of leaks before you take it into water.

Once ready to shoot underwater – before entering – consider doing a slow entrance into the water and, ideally, have someone in the boat lower your camera down to you.

Note: approximately every 10m/30ft adds one atmosphere of pressure to your casing, so keep that in mind if you do discover minor leaks.

Best cameras for in-water photography / best underwater cameras

Always favour weather sealed cameras. Weather sealing a camera refers to having rubber gaskets in the seams to keep water from the camera’s internals. However, if the lens doesn't have weather sealing also, water can still enter into the camera through the lens mount. Therefore, make sure to keep the lens mount dry.

Many cameras are already weather sealed, but don’t assume that your camera is necessarily weather sealed just because it’s a new model. Be sure to check with the camera manufacturer to verify.

GoPro is likely the first brand that most people think of when thinking underwater photography, and certainly they have some good options, such as the GoPro HERO7 Waterproof Action Camera, which also has a Waterproof Housing from FitStill. [Amazon Links] However, the image quality on GoPros often isn’t the greatest and they’re generally better for videography than photography.

Inexpensive point-and-shoot cameras for which you can find a water case/bag should be considered, especially if you don’t want to risk flooding an expensive DSLR.

Some underwater cameras to consider:

  • The Sealife DC1400 [Amazon Link] includes the Sea Dragon Flash and is waterproof down to 200 ft. (60 m)!
  • The Nikon COOLPIX AW130 [Amazon Link] is a durable camera that is waterproof down to 100 ft., freezeproof and shockproof
  • The Canon PowerShot D30 [Amazon Link] is waterproof down to 82 ft. below sea level
  • The Olympus TG-6 [Amazon Link] is waterproof (50 ft. / 15 m), dustproof, shockproof, crushproof, and freezeproof
  • The Ricoh WG-50 [Amazon Link] is waterproof down to 46 ft. – perfect for use when submerged
  • The Panasonic DMCTS30A [Amazon Link] is waterproof down to 26 ft. (8 m)

Some In-Water Photographs | Underwater Photography | Underwater Photographer

In-water photography tip: Get a strobe light! An underwater strobe [Amazon Link], AKA underwater flash, is important in underwater photography because it allows you to reduce backscatter (diffuse reflection) and enables you to capture better imagery in dark waters.

Maybe one of these nice in-water pictures can help inspire you to do some underwater photography of your own:

Shallow coral reef and red tropical fish

Shallow coral reef and red tropical fish. Yellow corals and swimming fish. Underwater photography from snorkeling with the marine life. Location: South Sinai Governorate, Egypt. Shutterstock: Royalty-free stock photo ID: 1716574591

Happy child engaged in sports swimming in the pool

Happy child engaged in sports swimming in the pool. He swims underwater on a blue background in swimming goggles and with toys in his hands. Shutterstock: Royalty-free stock photo ID: 1151510360

Swimming Elephant Underwater

Swimming Elephant Underwater. African elephant in ocean with mirrors and ripples at water surface. Shutterstock: Royalty-free stock photo ID: 360848669

Get Photography Equipment Insurance | Front Row Photography | Photographer Insurance | Underwater Photography Insurance

Hopefully these tips should allow you to avoid water-related damage to your photography gear. However, just in case something like that does happen, you will want to have photography insurance in place to help cover the cost of repair/replacement.

Front Row’s insurance for photographers is a good option for insuring your photo gear. You can get a quote online and purchase a policy in five minutes, or read more about the coverages available on the photography insurance site.

Note: underwater photography is not automatically covered and requires special underwriting authorization (but coverage is available). Contact us for more information.

Refer a Friend to Front Row Insurance

Based on customer demand, we’ve setup our referral marketing program and if you refer a friend to Front Row, you could win a $15 Amazon eGift Card OR be entered into a random draw to win a $99 Amazon eGift Card! (depending on your province)

Related posts:

What to Know About Rain Photography: Protecting Your Camera in Rain

Protecting Your Camera Lens(es)

Theft from Vehicle: Photography Insurance

DISCLAIMER: Informational statements regarding insurance coverage are for general description purposes only. These statements do not amend, modify or supplement any insurance policy. Consult the actual policy or your broker for details regarding terms, conditions, coverage, exclusions, products, services and programs which may be available to you. Your eligibility for particular products and services is subject to the final determination of underwriting qualifications and acceptance by the insurance underwriting company providing such products or services. This website does not make any representations that coverage does or does not exist for any particular claim or loss, or type of claim or loss, under any policy. Whether coverage exists or does not exist for any particular claim or loss under any policy depends on the facts and circumstances involved in the claim or loss and all applicable policy wording.

Amazon Associates Disclosure: Front Row Insurance is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon. This post may contain affiliate links. There is no additional cost to you.

Citations:

https://photographycourse.net/testing-underwater-housing-before-entering-the-water/

Topics: photography insurance

Guidance on Health and Safety for Film & TV Workers during COVID-19

Posted by Grant Patten on May 15, 2020 11:04:26 AM

HEALTH & SAFETY FOR FILM & TV WORKERS DURING COVID-19 (WSPS)

HEALTH & SAFETY FOR FILM & TV WORKERS DURING COVID-19Source: Royalty-free stock photo ID: 1680037777, Shutterstock

The Workplace Safety & Prevention Services (WSPS) has released some helpful guidelines for those in the film, TV and live performance industries who will soon be returning to production work in this COVID-19 environment. WSPS is an Ontario-focused organization, but this information could still be useful to those in other provinces or even the US as well.

Front Row Insurance is merely passing on these WSPS guidelines that might be helpful to some in planning their return to production, but please also consult an employment lawyer, public health and industry associations and government recommendations. The below is for informational purposes only and should not be considered advice.

Controls to consider for returning to production during COVID-19:

The WSPS documents have some helpful points to consider, including…

Are there tasks you can minimize or eliminate? For example, could any scenes that were planned to involve numerous people potentially be cut down to fewer people? Similarly, can scenes that involved people close together potentially be restructured to allow social distancing?

Limit entry points and control who comes onto set, who they speak to, and what they handle.

Have all crewmembers and visitors wash their hands thoroughly with soap and water, or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available, before entering the set, after contact with others, and with surfaces others have touched.

Train crewmembers on COVID-19 transmission points, steps being taken to protect them, and how to protect themselves, including frequent hand sanitizing, and not touching their face.

Is there an opportunity to put barriers in place between crewmembers on set? Consider using floor markings to keep people at a safe distance apart.

Is there an opportunity to improve fresh air intake/air circulation on set?

Increase cleaning frequency – on everything from desks, seats and vehicles to commonly touched surfaces like cameras, computers, microphones, phones, door handles and switches.

Ensure laundering instructions are being followed for wardrobe.

Review sanitation practices for hair and makeup stations to avoid spreading the virus and implement new practices.

Replace buffets with wrapped food items.

Consider having personal protective equipment (PPE) for crewmembers. Some examples of PPE that may be suited to supervisors, production or operations management work include gloves, masks, goggles and/or face shields.

Review your preventative measures on an ongoing basis, and adjust them if they are not working well enough or causing other issues with your work.

COVID Guideline Documents from Workplace Safety & Prevention Services (WSPS):

The above points are selections from the WSPS documents; you are encouraged to download the full documents, linked below:

Download: Workplace Safety & Prevention Services Guidance on Health and Safety for Television Hosts, Technical Crews and other TV and Film Employees during COVID-19 [PDF]

Download: Workplace Safety & Prevention Services Guidance on Health and Safety for Television, Film and Live Performance Sector during COVID-19 [PDF]

NOTE: These documents are intended for informational purposes only to provide an overview of the potential hazards posed in the workplace due to COVID-19. They are not intended as medical advice, to provide a comprehensive risk assessment for all workplaces, or to replace any legislated workplace safety obligations. Due to the ongoing evolution of the situation in Ontario and around the world, these documents may be used as a guide for Employers in addition to guidance delivered by public health authorities such as the World Health Organisation (WHO), Ontario Ministry of Health, Public Health Ontario and the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).” Any use which is made of these documents by any Employer, or any reliance on or decisions to be made based on them, are the responsibility of the Employer.

Good luck and take care,
The Front Row Team

Citations:

https://www.wsps.ca/

Topics: Film Production, Film Producers, Film Production Companies, TV Series, COVID-19

US Filmmakers: Entertainment Insurance 101 (for Budgets under $100K)

Posted by David Hamilton on May 15, 2020 10:51:00 AM

US Filmmakers: Entertainment Insurance 101 (for Budgets < $100K)

FILM PRODUCTION INSURANCE 101 FOR US FILMMAKERS | USA FILM INSURANCESource: Shutterstock Royalty-free stock illustration ID: 735595339

So you wrote a killer script, put together a budget, found your talent, and you’re ready to shoot your first project. You set the dates, bright-eyed, excited, and you go to rent some production equipment, and maybe a couple of props or costumes.

You get the quote from the prop house, and it requires insurance. You call your personal auto insurance agent, and they don’t know how to help.

You scour blogs, resource pages, and ask your friends whom they talked to for their production insurance. Once you talk to a broker, it’s like they’re speaking a different language. You feel confused, frustrated – “I just want to rent some cameras and shoot!”

WHAT IS FILM PRODUCTION INSURANCE? | FILM PRODUCTION INSURANCE USA | US-BASED FILM PRODUCTION INSURANCE

At Front Row, we understand how confusing production insurance can be because many of us were filmmakers (in prior lives) and have been there ourselves!

Every film production insurance policy needs to be tailored to the company, or to the project if a short-term film policy. A film insurance policy is based on the best offerings from insurance companies that provide entertainment production coverage.

A SOLID FILM INSURANCE POLICY WILL PROTECT THE PRODUCER FROM:

  • liability related to injuries on set
  • accidents in working vehicles
  • theft
  • loss and damage of rented and owned equipment
  • can also protect producers from libel or copyright infringement claims

Pro Tip: If you are a producer on a project, you carry the majority of the responsibility if something goes awry. This huge responsibility can have financial, legal, even criminal ramifications to you personally.

So, now we know what production insurance is, or at least get the general idea. But just because you purchased insurance, don’t think that everything you touch will necessarily be protected.

AN OVERVIEW OF THE FILM INSURANCE POLICIES OFFERED BY FRONT ROW FOR US FILMMAKERS:

PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT INSURANCE

Covers against risks of direct physical loss, damage or destruction to cameras, camera equipment, sound & lighting equipment, grip equipment, portable electrical equipment & generators, mechanical effects equipment and similar miscellaneous equipment.

This coverage also typically includes loss of use of property of others for which the renter or producer is legally liable. The limit of coverage for production equipment should be sufficient to cover the replacement cost of ALL equipment being used on the project. Most equipment rental houses will include in their contract a statement confirming the renter’s requirement to fully insure the equipment in their possession.

This coverage may also be known as Inland Marine, or Rented Equipment coverage. If there is a loss for an item you rented, the insurance company will pay the amount to replace it. When your broker asks you for a replacement value, they are not referring to how much you are paying to rent, but how much it would be to replace this item. If you ask most rental/prop houses, they will add it onto your invoice if it isn’t already noted. Note: When Rental Equipment Value is greater than $25K USD, General Liability is mandatory and cannot be removed.

If you own more than $5,000 USD in production equipment, it’s best to purchase a separate Annual Equipment Floater Policy that covers your Owned Equipment Worldwide. It’s much more cost effective than purchasing the coverage for one project.

Equipment Floater Policy US quote.

SHORT-TERM PRODUCTION INSURANCE (SHORT SHOOT)

Short-Term Production Insurance is perfect for the new or indie filmmaker who may not have more than one project scheduled in the next six months. This coverage is ideal for singular projects and can satisfy insurance requirements from film schools, rental houses, permit offices, prop houses, and/or studio location rental space.

Pricing starts at around $500 USD for minimal coverages. The premium amount for 1-10 days of coverage is the same price and it will increase with the more days you add, but 60 days is the maximum coverage period for short-term policies.

Short Shoot US quote.

DICE INSURANCE (ANNUAL)

Q. What's the difference between short-term production insurance versus annual?

A. Short-term production insurance covers your productions on a project-by-project scale. Purchased on this scale, short-term policies can cover as little as one day of production (although you should cover your prep days, too).

Planning to shoot multiple times throughout the year, and have an estimated budget over $15K USD? Then you’ll want an annual (DICE) policy. This coverage can be much more cost effective than Short-Term Production Insurance. Pricing starts around $2,500 USD for the year. Financing may be available.

Although DICE policies can be completely customized to fit your productions need, the following coverage options are available:

DICE US quote.

FILM PRODUCER’S E&O INSURANCE

If your project is being sold or distributed, Errors & Omissions (E&O) coverage may be for you; in fact, most distribution contracts will require this coverage. All television, streaming services, and feature films will require this coverage.

E&O coverage protects your production and covers any legal cost if another party accuses you of an unoriginal idea, e.g., title, characters, plots.

Pricing starting around $3,000 USD for three years of coverage.

Film producer’s E&O US quote.

OTHER FILM INSURANCE COVERAGES TO CONSIDER:

GENERAL LIABILITY

Although film policies vary widely, you’ll always need general liability. General liability covers bodily injury and property damage that occurs during the course of filming. Cast and crew are exempt from this and covered separately through a workers compensation policy. This coverage is required by most city/county permit offices.

The standard minimum policy is $1 million USD, and when the location is open to the public or sells tickets, it quickly jumps into a $5 million USD umbrella. The umbrella covers the possibility that more than one person gets injured in the facility during filming or live shows.

Example: you are filming on a sidewalk and a bystander walks by and trips on a cable; this would be a loss that would be covered by general liability. Now, if a cast or crew member trips, that would not be covered under general liability; that would be workers compensation (see below).

WORKERS COMPENSATION

Workers compensation protects you should something happen to your employees on the job. It's important to go over how you are covering crew (employees) and independent contractors.

YOU NEED A WORKER COMPENSATION POLICY IF:

  • You work as an independent contractor or freelancer
  • You are paid full rate, no taxes withheld (from a provided invoice)
  • You provide the production with a W-9 for labor or labor & gear

YOUR WORKERS COMPENSATION POLICY:

  • Can cover your payrolled cast & crew, 1099 freelancers and volunteers
  • Can cover your working crew in periods outside of general production
  • Protects you from claims arising from injuries to your crew
  • Provides for you in the case of injury on the job
  • Covers medical costs, loss of work or death benefits if injuries occur on the job

Note: If there are Hazardous Activities/Scenes (e.g., animals, stunts, guns, fight scenes, car chases, water scenes, aerial shoots), then Workers Comp is excluded and cannot be added. You must obtain Workers Comp either through a payroll company or through your local State Fund (if in California, contact https://www.statefundca.com). This will take extra time, so if you have a shoot this weekend, you may want to reconsider how important that stunt is to the project.

THIRD PARTY PROPERTY DAMAGE

Legal liability for damage to or destruction of property belonging to others (including loss of use of the property) while the property is in the care, custody or control of the production company and is used or to be used in an insured production.

Physical damage to your location or other rented premises is not included unless Third Party Property Damage (TPPD) is purchased. If you are filming in a studio or using a platform like Peerspace for your project, this cover will most likely be required. Note: TPPD excludes the home/property of the producers, cast and crew of the project.

NON-OWNED/HIRED AUTO

Hired/Non-Owned Auto Liability covers damages and injuries sustained by other motorists that your production rental vehicle accidentally hits when your production is considered “At Fault”.

Hired/Non-Owned Auto Physical Damage covers accidental damages of the rental vehicle itself. The personal vehicles of the named insured/company owner and its officers are excluded. Personal auto insurance of cast/crew is primary coverage and Hired/Non-Owned Auto Liability of the production policy is excess/secondary coverage.

UMBRELLA LIABILITY

This policy provides additional limits to the general liability, auto liability, employers’ liability (under workers’ compensation policy) and third party property damage coverages. Some locations will require higher limits than the standard general/auto liability policy of $1mil USD.

GUILD/UNION TRAVEL ACCIDENT

Provides travel accident coverages (accidental death and dismemberment) as required by the guild or union contracts to which the producer is signatory. Coverage is blanket and the limits of liability meet all signatory requirements. Coverage may be extended to non-union employees, usually with a benefit limit of $50K USD each person.

PRODUCTION PACKAGE

A production package is an accumulation of coverages to protect multiple or singular projects such as features, TV series, or documentaries. If you have an annual gross production cost over $100,000 USD and are looking for annual coverage, a production package will be necessary.

Note: Most carriers do not sell just the production package; you most likely will be required to purchase general liability as well. Minimum premiums start around $6,000 USD. Some coverages available in a production package are:

Cast Coverage Example: the lead actor of your feature is running three hours late and may not come in because they have food poisoning. Your cast, crew, makeup artists have all shown up and are waiting. Cast Coverage would cover any loss associated with the actor not being present; expenses for that shoot day would be covered.

Negative Film — direct physical loss, damage or destruction of raw film or tape stock, exposed film (developed or undeveloped), videotape, matrices, lavenders, positives, inter-positives, working prints, cutting copies, fine grain prints, color transparencies, cells artwork and drawings, hard drives, software and related materials used to generate computer images, and soundtracks and tapes, up to the amount of the insured production cost.

Negative Film Example: you just wrapped up all the post work on a TV series and are running late to go meet a potential investor for coffee. You ask the new PA to hand-deliver the hard drive to the network, which is a few blocks away. The PA receives a phone call, leaves the hard drive on the roof of the car, and drives away… Negative Film would cover up to the gross production cost in the case of a loss.

Faulty Stock — loss, damage, or destruction of “negative film” caused by or resulting from fogging or the use of faulty materials (including cameras), faulty sound equipment, or faulty developing. Faulty coverage does not include loss caused by errors of judgement in exposure, lighting or sound recording; from the use of incorrect type of raw stock; or faulty manipulation by the cameraman unless a separate extension is included in coverage.

Props, Sets, and Wardrobe — provides coverage on props, sets, scenery, costumes, wardrobe and similar property against risks of direct physical loss, damage or destruction during the specified production period, subject to certain policy exclusions. Coverage for jewelry/furs/fine art is included with sub-limits. Animals can also be added. Coverage may also include loss of use of property of others for which the production is legally liable.

Miscellaneous Equipment — covers against direct physical loss, damage or destruction of camera, sound and lighting equipment, portable electric equipment and generators, mechanical effects equipment, grip equipment, and similar equipment for which the production company is legally liable. Coverage may include loss of use of property of others for which the production is legally liable. This coverage generally extends to cover physical damage to rented vehicles also.

Extra Expense — indemnifies the insured for extra expense incurred as a result of interruption, postponement or cancellation of a declared production as a direct and sole result of loss of (including damage to) property or facilities contracted by the insured (props/sets/wardrobe, miscellaneous equipment, third party property) in connection with the production insured. Coverage extensions are available for civil authority, ingress/egress, imminent peril, power interruption and strikes.

Office Contents — provides coverage on office property and computers, including laptops and similar property against risks of direct physical loss, damage or destruction during the specified production period.

Money & Currency — provides coverage for actual physical loss of funds during production (i.e., petty cash) against robbery, theft, embezzlement, or forgery of checks.

Q: Still have questions about your project, or have a specialty risk? No problem. US-based filmmakers can contact the LA office:

14156 Magnolia Blvd., Suite 200
Sherman Oaks, CA 91423
PH: 424 529 6701
Email: LAoffice@frontrowinsurance.com

If calling from the United States, contact:
Mike Groner
Ph: 424-529-6704
Email: mike@frontrowinsurance.com 

for California:
Kathryn Hoffman
Ph: 424-644-1411
Email: kathryn@frontrowinsurance.com

Kent Hamilton
Ph: 424-529-6700
Email: kent@frontrowinsurance.com

Doug Hodges
Ph: 424 329 2480 
Email: doug@frontrowinsurance.com

for New York:
Stacie O'Beirne
Ph: 646-849-4114
Email: stacie@frontrowinsurance.com

for Nashville:
Tom P. Corley
Ph: 615-326-4226
Email: tom@frontrowinsurance.com

RELATED:

Getting a film permit in Los Angeles / film permits LA

Book on Amazon: Film Insurance 101

FREE eBook: E&O Insurance 101

Topics: Short Film Insurance, Film Producer's E&O Insurance, DICE Insurance, US Film insurance broker, non-owned auto insurance, Third Party Property Damage, Workers Compensation

Organizing Your Camera Gear / Keeping Track of Your Photography Gear

Posted by Grant Patten on May 6, 2020 7:26:54 AM

ORGANIZING YOUR CAMERA GEAR / KEEPING TRACK OF YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY GEAR

ORGANIZING YOUR CAMERA GEAR / KEEPING TRACK OF YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY GEARSource: Royalty-free stock photo ID: 1569424465, Shutterstock

Photographers often have a lot of photography gear and it can, eventually, become difficult to keep track of what’s going out and what’s coming in. Since we provide photography insurance and want to help photographers protect their gear, it also makes sense to provide some tips on maintaining and inventorying photography gear.

“Triage” Your Photography Equipment to Determine the Best Locations

Determine where each piece of photography equipment should go based on how available you need it to be. For example: some of your less frequently used equipment could be placed in the dark pockets of a camera bag, while your one ND filter should probably go in a protective case that you keep on you.

Ideally, you have a camera bag with separate sections, such as the Peak Design Everyday Messenger Bag [Amazon Link] or the Tenba 637-403 Cooper 13 DSLR Camera Bag [Amazon Link]. Consider dedicating specific pieces of gear to each section, rather than just stuffing gear in haphazardly. Organizing your camera bag in this manner not only makes you a more professional photographer, but it will prevent you from buying memory cards when you still have some!

A camera harness such as the Nicama Camera Carrier Chest Harness Vest [Amazon Link] or the Cotton Carrier G3 Dual Camera Harness [Amazon Link] can be useful for keeping your photography gear on your person as much as possible, which is the best way to prevent theft.

Consider Asset Labeling Your Photography Equipment / Asset Tags / Asset Labels

Asset labeling on laptop, photography insuranceSource: Royalty-free stock vector ID: 206120767, Shutterstock

In addition to serial numbers, asset labels can be helpful. Asset labeling is the process of giving a unique identity to each piece of your equipment through assigning it a specific code or number. This is accomplished by affixing a label to the equipment that bears the number. An example of such a product is the AVERY PermaTrack Metallic Asset Tag Labels [Amazon Link]. The CHEQROOM mobile app/asset tagging product is another example.

Why do asset labeling if all your items have serial numbers anyway?

If handling many items, a serial number – while important to record for warranty & repair purposes – isn't ideal because most professional photographers likely want a faster method of counting/auditing their gear. Especially if they have many similar-looking items, as many photographers do, asset labels are helpful to identify which item is which.

Photography Apps for Photography Equipment Maintenance & Inventory | Photo Gear Tracker | Photography Equipment Tracker

An Excel spreadsheet is the first obvious choice, but Apache OpenOffice can also do the job.

Google Sheets is the go-to free online spreadsheet app that you’ve likely used already. It is perfectly suitable for this task, but in case you’d like something more specialized, read on…

Apps for photography gear maintenance that have received good reviews include:

The Sortly app is on iOS and Android and can be used for photography equipment. You can scan and update items using QR labels or barcodes.

Asset Panda is available online and on iOS and Android. The app is highly configurable, so it can become whatever you need it to be, and adjust as your needs change.

GearEye is an RFID-enabled device that tells you if you have all the gear that you need with you at any given time. In case something is missing, this device helps you locate it.

The Lenstag iOS app allows you to look up serial numbers of gear that you're thinking about buying to see if it is stolen gear, report missing gear and securely transfer gear to other photographers.

Home Inventory is an easy-to-use Mac app allowing you to document and manage your home and belongings. Photographers can “go paperless” using this app by storing photos, receipts, product manuals, warranties, notes, and important documents for quick and easy access.

The MyGearVault app was designed specifically to input, organize and protect photography gear. It's a free app designed for photographers and videographers, available on both Android and iOS.

If you would like to automate your inventory management and asset tracking, take a look at Zapier, which allows you to connect different apps together. For example, you could update a spreadsheet using a Google Form to make data entry a little easier.

Photography Equipment Inventory List

We often get the question, “Where do I upload my photos/list of my insured equipment?” …actually, we do not require an equipment list for our files, but it is a requirement that photography insurance clients have an equipment list that can be supplied to the insurer in the event of a claim.

How should this photography equipment list be assembled? There is no one “official” or “proper” way of doing it. Simply create a spreadsheet – perhaps using one of the apps mentioned above – and document all the information you feel necessary to keep track of your photography gear.

Get Photography Insurance | Front Row Photography | Photographer Insurance | Photographers Insurance | photo gear insurance

Following these tips will, hopefully, allow you to properly keep track of your photography gear and avoid an unfortunate occurrence like theft of photography equipment – but in case that does happen – you would ideally have insurance coverage in place.

Front Row’s insurance for photographers is a good option for insuring your photo gear. Many Canadian photographers have come to recognize Front Row as the industry’s best coverage – and rely upon us to protect their valuable camera gear. You can get a quote online, purchase a policy online in five mins. or read more about the coverages available on the photography insurance site.

Refer a Friend to Front Row Insurance

Based on customer demand, we’ve setup our referral marketing program and if you refer a friend to Front Row, you could win a $15 Amazon eGift Card OR be entered into a random draw to win a $99 Amazon eGift Card! (depending on your province)

Related posts:

What to Know About Rain Photography: Protecting Your Camera in Rain

Protect Your Camera Lens

Theft from Vehicle: Photography Insurance

 

DISCLAIMER: Informational statements regarding insurance coverage are for general description purposes only. These statements do not amend, modify or supplement any insurance policy. Consult the actual policy or your broker for details regarding terms, conditions, coverage, exclusions, products, services and programs which may be available to you. Your eligibility for particular products and services is subject to the final determination of underwriting qualifications and acceptance by the insurance underwriting company providing such products or services. This website does not make any representations that coverage does or does not exist for any particular claim or loss, or type of claim or loss, under any policy. Whether coverage exists or does not exist for any particular claim or loss under any policy depends on the facts and circumstances involved in the claim or loss and all applicable policy wording.

Amazon Associates Disclosure: Front Row Insurance is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon. This post may contain affiliate links. There is no additional cost to you.

Citations:

https://www.photographytalk.com/beginner-photography-tips/surefire-ways-to-keep-track-of-your-photography-gear

https://www.cheqroom.com/blog/guide-to-asset-labeling/

Topics: photography insurance

The Best Cameras for YouTube in 2020 | Best Vlogging Cameras in 2020

Posted by Grant Patten on May 1, 2020 10:03:35 AM

The Best Cameras for YouTube | Best Vlogging Cameras

Best Cameras for YouTube / Good cameras for YouTubeSource: Royalty-free stock photo ID: 1127191604, Shutterstock

Many of our film insurance customers are avid YouTubers, so we thought it would be useful to assemble this post about our research on the best cameras for recording YouTube videos. Let’s review some of the best cameras for YouTube and vlogging (video blogging) available on the market now. We’ll go from inexpensive to more expensive. We’ll discuss:

Best vlogging cameras under $200 / best vlogging camera cheap / best cheap camera for YouTube / best vlogging camera for beginners

The Canon PowerShot ELPH 190 [Amazon Affiliate Link] features a wide-angle lens with 10x Optical Zoom & Image Stabilization, 720p HD video and built-in WiFi – not bad at all for a camera under $200 CAD!

The YI Lite Action Camera [Amazon Affiliate Link] is under $200 CAD and offers some cool features for such an inexpensive camera, including 4K video at 30 fps, a 2.0” LCD touchscreen and up to 130 minutes of recording time. However, the reality of shooting video for YouTube is that 4K resolution is, for the moment, probably not necessary. It is nice to have that option, though.

The Sony DSC- W830 [Amazon Affiliate Link] has a 20.1 megapixel CCD image sensor with 8x zoom. It can shoot 1280 x 720 HD movies at 30 fps and it includes a neat Sweep Panorama mode, allowing you to capture panoramic shots in 360° full circle.

Best vlogging cameras under $500 / best camera for travel vlogging / budget camera for youtube

If you need a really small and compact camera that can still record amazing image quality (RAW format photos and D-Cinelike videos), check out the DJI Osmo Pocket. [Amazon Affiliate Link] It can shoot 4K/60fps video at 100 mbps. This camera is a popular choice for vloggers and travelers.

The GoPro HERO8 Black [Amazon Affiliate Link] is especially useful for YouTubers and vloggers who like to surf or otherwise film in the ocean because the camera is waterproof. It also has three levels of stabilization and some cool additional features such as Time Warp and Live Burst.

 

The Sony DSC-RX100 [Amazon Affiliate Link] is a nice camera under $500 CAD and suitable for vlogging. It includes an excellent F1.8 Carl Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T* lens and a useful Intelligent Auto mode, which detects the lighting of a scene and sets the camera accordingly.

Best vlogging cameras under $1000 / best canon camera for vlogging

Canon Powershot G7X Mark IIIYou can get the Canon Powershot G7X Mark III Digital Camera [Amazon Affiliate Link] for just under $1,000 CAD at the time of this writing. This model features a new-and-improved 20.1 Megapixel 1.0” stacked CMOS sensor. The 4.2x optical zoom lens – while modest – is generally suitable for vlogging purposes. The flip-out LCD screen even has a tilt option for better angles on your selfies.

The Canon EOS M50 [Amazon Affiliate Link] is a mirrorless camera (these cameras have the advantage of being lighter, more compact, and generally better for video). The camera’s Vari-angle touchscreen LCD is perfect for vlogging; you can see what you’re recording without having the screen prevent you from adding an external microphone and/or tripod. The Dual Pixel CMOS Autofocus system is quite advanced for this price level of camera.

The Panasonic LUMIX G85 [Amazon Affiliate Link] is another mirrorless camera that is less bulky than a DSLR, so also suitable for vlogging. The 16-megapixel Digital Live MOS sensor allows the camera to capture excellent quality photos and videos. It has a swing-out viewfinder, excellent ergonomics, built-in stabilization and a great menu system. The camera is also weather sealed, which is essential if you enjoy vlogging in the rain or other challenging environments.

Best vlogging cameras under $2000

The Sony Alpha A6400 [Amazon Affiliate Link] is also an excellent vlogging camera that shoots 4K video (24.2-megapixel APS-C size CMOS sensor). This camera has no record time limit!

For vloggers who prefer to use camcorders, the Canon VIXIA HF G50 [Amazon Affiliate Link] is a very good prosumer camcorder, capable of shooting 4K at 30p (although the 1080/720p options are sufficient for presenting on YouTube). It has a generous 20x optical zoom lens.

The Canon 90D [Amazon Affiliate Link] offers upgrades over the older 80D such as a higher-resolution sensor and a new electronic shutter/faster shutter speed (up to 1/16,000 second).

For reference, here is an example video shot on the 90D:

Important vlogging accessories to consider / YouTube camera accessories / vlogging camera stand / vlog lighting / microphone for vlogging

Joby GorillaPod 1K KitVlogging camera stand

If you’re going to be getting any of the above camera gear, you’ll also want to consider getting a good tripod/camera stand such as the Joby GorillaPod 1K Kit [Amazon Affiliate Link] or the AmazonBasics 60-Inch Lightweight Tripod with Bag [Amazon Affiliate Link].

Vlog lighting

A good mobile light is the Lume Cube AIR Magnetic LED Light. [Amazon Affiliate Link] Although some might argue that they’re a bit overpriced, these little cubes output clean light at 5600K, they have adjustable brightness levels, and they’re waterproof!

Microphone for vlogging

When vlogging – especially outside or anywhere that isn’t completely quiet – you’ll want to get an on-board microphone to go with your camera. This will improve audio quality. A good one is the Rode VideoMicro Compact On-Camera Microphone. [Amazon Affiliate Link]

If you’d like to get even better audio quality for your vlogs and don’t mind spending a bit more for it, consider getting a lav (lavalier) mic such as the Sennheiser EW 112P G4. [Amazon Affiliate Link] This Sennheiser lav kit will get you broadcast quality sound at up to 8 hours of operation time.

Get DigiGear Insurance | Film Equipment Insurance | Film Gear Insurance | Sound & Lighting Insurance

If you end up buying any of these above cameras (or any other gear) – you’ll want to have the right insurance coverage in place to protect that valuable gear.

Front Row’s DigiGear insurance policy is a good option for insuring your filmmaking gear, including your vlogging camera(s). You can get a quote online, purchase a policy online in 5 mins, or read more about the coverages available here: https://digigearinsure.frontrowinsurance.com/

If the camera is more of a photography camera or lower in value, consider Front Row’s photography insurance policy instead: https://photographer.frontrowinsurance.com/

Refer a Friend to Front Row Insurance

Based on customer demand, we’ve setup our referral marketing program and if you refer a friend to Front Row, you could win a $15 Amazon eGift Card OR be entered into a random draw to win a $99 Amazon eGift Card! (depending on your province)

Related posts:

THE BEST CAMERAS FOR FILMMAKING

HOW TO PROTECT YOUR CAMERA LENS(ES)

PREVENTING FILM EQUIPMENT THEFT – TIPS & TRICKS

HOW TO CHOOSE BETWEEN A DICE INSURANCE POLICY AND A DIGIGEAR POLICY?

 

DISCLAIMER: Informational statements regarding insurance coverage are for general description purposes only. These statements do not amend, modify or supplement any insurance policy. Consult the actual policy or your broker for details regarding terms, conditions, coverage, exclusions, products, services and programs which may be available to you. Your eligibility for particular products and services is subject to the final determination of underwriting qualifications and acceptance by the insurance underwriting company providing such products or services. This website does not make any representations that coverage does or does not exist for any particular claim or loss, or type of claim or loss, under any policy. Whether coverage exists or does not exist for any particular claim or loss under any policy depends on the facts and circumstances involved in the claim or loss and all applicable policy wording.

Amazon Associates Disclosure: Front Row Insurance is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon. This post may contain affiliate links. There is no additional cost to you.

Citations:

Topics: photography insurance, DigiGear, Best of

Video: What is a Premium? What is a Deductible?

Posted by Grant Patten on Apr 28, 2020 7:54:34 AM

What is a Premium? What is a Deductible?

Disclaimer: the deductible amounts disclosed in this video are current to April 2020 and are subject to change.

What is an insurance premium?

An insurance premium is the amount of money an individual or business pays for an insurance policy. Premiums are collected and kept in reserve in order to pay out claims as they arise. The insurance company must anticipate how much premium they will need to collect in order to have the funds available to pay out losses when they occur. In layman’s terms, they have to make an educated guess.

Wondering why your premium has changed? Well, the changes in premiums this year are a reflection of the overall loss ratio on the insurance program. In order for an insurance program to remain viable, the amount paid out in losses cannot exceed the amount collected in premiums.

What is an insurance deductible?

A deductible is the amount of the loss that you are responsible for covering before the insurance policy will respond. Say you have a USB drive stolen. Replacing it would cost $60, but your deductible is $350. Although, “technically” the claim would be covered, it is below your deductible, so the insurance company wouldn’t be responsible for paying any part of the claim.

Another example: you drop your camera, but it only costs $200 to fix. Although it is the kind of damage that would be covered under the policy, you are responsible for the first $350 of the loss. In this case, again, the insurer would not have any responsibility to pay the claim, because the expense was not more than the $350 deductible.

If you damage a $500 lens, though, you would pay for the first $350 (your deductible), then the insurance company would cover the next $150.

A review of the Front Row online insurance program deductibles (in Canadian dollars):

Photography insurance (photographer.frontrowinsurance.com) deductibles:

  • Equipment deductible: $350 per occurrence
  • Photographer’s Enhancement Pack deductible: $500 per occurrence
  • Theft from an Unattended Vehicle deductible: $2,500 per occurrence
  • Outside Canada and United States of America (“Out of Country”) deductible: $750
  • General Liability deductible: $500 per occurrence

The deductible applies to any one incident, not per item. Only one deductible, whichever is highest, would apply per claim.

DigiGear insurance (digigearinsure.frontrowinsurance.com) deductibles:

  • Owned Mobile Equipment  - $1,000
  • Owned Fixed Equipment - $1,000
  • Rented Equipment - $1,000
  • Lessors' Contingency Coverage - $1,000
  • Commercial General Liability - $1,000

Short Shoot insurance (shortshoot.frontrowinsurance.com) deductibles:

The rented equipment deductible is $1,000 per event. This applies to any one incident, not per item.

Musical instrument insurance (musicians.frontrowinsurance.com) deductibles:

The equipment deductible is $250 per claim. Again: This applies to any one incident, not per item.

SOLO Theatrical Insurance (stagelive.frontrowinsurance.com) deductibles:

The deductible for Each Occurrence is $500.

Event insurance (events.frontrowinsurance.com) deductibles:

  • Rented Equipment Coverage: $500 Per Claim
  • Rented Tents/Marquees: $250 Per Claim
  • Wedding Enhancement Package Coverages: $250 Per Claim
  • Birthday Party / Bar/Bat Mitzvah / Anniversary Package Coverages: $250 Per Claim
  • Cancellation Coverage: None
  • General Liability, Each Occurrence: $500 for claims of Bodily Injury / Property Damage
  • Tenant Legal Liability: $500 Per Claim

Workplace Office insurance (workplaceinsure.frontrowinsurance.com) deductibles:

There are various deductibles under the Workplace policy. The deductible will depend on the coverage. For example, the deductible for theft of office property is $500.

Cyber Hack insurance (hackinsure.frontrowinsurance.com) deductibles:

A basic cyber insurance policy would generally come along with a $1,000 deductible.

Get Insurance with Front Row

Whether you’re interested in film insurance, photography insurance, event insurance or another insurance product, consider Front Row Insurance for your insurance needs.


Related:

Topics: musical instrument insurance, Short Film Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, film insurance premium, Office Contents Insurance, Theatre Insurance, event insurance, photography insurance, DigiGear, Cyber Insurance

Insurance for Photos Booths | Photo Booth Insurance from Front Row

Posted by Grant Patten on Apr 24, 2020 7:06:42 AM

Insurance for Photos Booths | Photo Booth Insurance from Front Row

Insurance for Photos Booths | Photo Booth Insurance from Front RowSource: Royalty-free stock photo ID: 506775367, Shutterstock

We’re often asked, “Does Front Row’s photography insurance program cover photo booths?” The answer is yes; it does, but within some narrow parameters explained below. We do not cover any and all photo booths – they have to be a certain kind of photo booth. Read on…

Front Row’s photo booth insurance | insurance for photo booths | insurance for photo booth business | photo booth business insurance

Photo booths are eligible for Front Row’s photography insurance program if:

  • the “booth” is not a physical room that people enter (but inflatable rooms are OK)
  • the photo booth equipment is not left unattended

There are no exceptions made for physical room-type booths.

Illustration of the kinds of photo booths covered & not covered:

Front Row’s photo booth insurance | insurance for photo booths

Why get photo booth insurance | insurance for photo booths?

Think nothing bad can happen to your photo booth? Well, think again! Front Row’s photography insurance program includes coverage for theft, damage, fire, and loss of use, and any of these unfortunate incidents could happen to a photo booth.

Photo booth insurance – theft

If your photo booth is stolen, insurance could replace it (this is covered under the policy through filing a claim).

Photo booth insurance – fire

Fire is a scary thing – and although we certainly hope it doesn’t happen to your photo booth – one bad fire is capable of destroying a photo booth business very quickly.

Photo booth insurance – damage

If you’re a photo booth business owner, you’ve likely heard plenty of stories already about photo booth vandalism. Photo booths seem to be a preferred target of vandals, for whatever reason. But remember, as mentioned above, your photo booth cannot be left unattended if you expect insurance coverage.

There are other examples of damage that could happen even with a photo booth attendant present, though. What if you plug in the wrong power cord, leading to a short circuit, damaging your photo booth and maybe even the venue too? The venue owner could sue for damages. That’s where commercial general liability (CGL) coverage comes in handy.

Photo booth insurance – commercial general liability

You can purchase CGL cover through Front Row's photographer’s insurance program. This cover is designed to protect against claims of bodily injury or property damage to third parties caused by your operations as a photographer (and/or photo booth business owner). It includes the cost of a lawyer to defend you.

What if, for example, you didn’t tape down your photo booth cord(s) sufficiently, and someone trips over a cord, injuring themselves, and they decide to sue?

Photo booth insurance – money & securities

Front Row’s photography insurance program includes money & securities coverage for up to $15,000 CAD. This covers against loss by theft or destruction of money & securities inside your premises.

Common photo booth insurance questions

Q. Where am I covered? Canada? US? Worldwide?

A. The basic policy provides coverage within Canada and the US only. For additional premium, coverage may be purchased on a Limited Worldwide basis – meaning the insurance applies anywhere in the world, except where the insurance carrier is legally prohibited from providing insurance.

Q. What about airplane travel with my photo booth – is that covered?

A. If you plan to travel outside of Canada/USA, you must choose the correct option to cover the number of days you intend to travel. Failure to do so would be considered misrepresenting a material fact, and would be grounds for denying coverage or cancelling your policy. If you do not yet know how long you will be travelling, or your plans change during the year, you can contact our office to add additional days’ coverage to your policy.

Q. What if my photo booth gets stolen from a vehicle? Is that covered?

A. Yes – under certain circumstances/criteria. Read our blog post "Theft from Vehicle" for a detailed answer to this question.

Any other questions? Please contact the Front Row office nearest you.

Photo booth accessories / photo booth propsSome photo booth accessories / photo booth props to consider

If you haven’t already acquired enough accessories for your photo booth, allow us to suggest a few that look pretty cool:

Get Photography Insurance | Photography Equipment Insurance | Front Row Photography | Photographer Insurance

Front Row’s insurance for photographers is a good option for insuring your photo booth if it does, indeed, meet the requirements outlined above. Many Canadian photographers have come to recognize Front Row as the industry’s best coverage – and rely upon us to protect their gear.

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Citations:

https://www.catalinabloch.com/

Topics: photography insurance

Does film producer's E&O insurance protect against claims of breach of contract?

Posted by Kailin Che on Apr 21, 2020 8:00:30 AM

DOES film producer's E&O INSURANCE PROTECT AGAINST CLAIMS OF BREACH OF CONTRACT?

WHAT TO KNOW ABOUT IMPLIED-IN-FACT AGREEMENTS | IMPLIED CONTRACTS | IMPLIED TERMS

E&O INSURANCE FILM | ERRORS AND OMISSIONS INSURANCE FILM:


Kailin Che (Lawyer)
: An E&O policy does not cover claims relating to breaches of contract, e.g., if a producer breaches a contract provision with a writer, that won’t be covered by E&O insurance. There is a narrow exception to this rule and that’s in implied-in-fact agreements; those will be covered by E&O insurance.

So, a producer must assess whether or not there were any implied contracts that were established through conduct. Often, people think submission of an idea is sufficient to constitute implied-in-fact contracts; that’s not correct.

there are two clear requirements for establishing implied-in-fact contracts:

  1. the person who is sharing the idea must express the expectation to be compensated prior to sharing or if they share the idea.
  2. the recipient, e.g., the producer must know that there is this expectation of compensation and then voluntarily accepts the receipt of the idea.

So, in terms of limiting your potential liability in an implied-in-fact agreement, it’s possible if a producer ensures that every person who comes before them to submit any sort of idea signs an Idea Release Submission Form. [template credit: Early Sullivan Wright Gizer & McRae LLP]

 

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About: Kailin Che is a corporate/commercial lawyer who represents clients in a broad range of industries including, technology, entertainment, manufacturing and real estate. She has advised clients on a variety of endeavors, including mergers and acquisitions, financing, reorganizations, corporate governance and regulatory compliance. Kailin began her legal career at a global law firm in Toronto and is licensed to practice in both Ontario and British Columbia.

Topics: Film Producer's E&O Insurance, Film Insurance claims