Video: What is a Premium? What is a Deductible?

Posted by Grant Patten on Apr 28, 2020 7:54:34 AM

What is a Premium? What is a Deductible?

Disclaimer: the deductible amounts disclosed in this video are current to April 2020 and are subject to change.

What is an insurance premium?

An insurance premium is the amount of money an individual or business pays for an insurance policy. Premiums are collected and kept in reserve in order to pay out claims as they arise. The insurance company must anticipate how much premium they will need to collect in order to have the funds available to pay out losses when they occur. In layman’s terms, they have to make an educated guess.

Wondering why your premium has changed? Well, the changes in premiums this year are a reflection of the overall loss ratio on the insurance program. In order for an insurance program to remain viable, the amount paid out in losses cannot exceed the amount collected in premiums.

What is an insurance deductible?

A deductible is the amount of the loss that you are responsible for covering before the insurance policy will respond. Say you have a USB drive stolen. Replacing it would cost $60, but your deductible is $350. Although, “technically” the claim would be covered, it is below your deductible, so the insurance company wouldn’t be responsible for paying any part of the claim.

Another example: you drop your camera, but it only costs $200 to fix. Although it is the kind of damage that would be covered under the policy, you are responsible for the first $350 of the loss. In this case, again, the insurer would not have any responsibility to pay the claim, because the expense was not more than the $350 deductible.

If you damage a $500 lens, though, you would pay for the first $350 (your deductible), then the insurance company would cover the next $150.

A review of the Front Row online insurance program deductibles (in Canadian dollars):

Photography insurance (photographer.frontrowinsurance.com) deductibles:

  • Equipment deductible: $350 per occurrence
  • Photographer’s Enhancement Pack deductible: $500 per occurrence
  • Theft from an Unattended Vehicle deductible: $2,500 per occurrence
  • Outside Canada and United States of America (“Out of Country”) deductible: $750
  • General Liability deductible: $500 per occurrence

The deductible applies to any one incident, not per item. Only one deductible, whichever is highest, would apply per claim.

DigiGear insurance (digigearinsure.frontrowinsurance.com) deductibles:

  • Owned Mobile Equipment  - $1,000
  • Owned Fixed Equipment - $1,000
  • Rented Equipment - $1,000
  • Lessors' Contingency Coverage - $1,000
  • Commercial General Liability - $1,000

Short Shoot insurance (shortshoot.frontrowinsurance.com) deductibles:

The rented equipment deductible is $1,000 per event. This applies to any one incident, not per item.

Musical instrument insurance (musicians.frontrowinsurance.com) deductibles:

The equipment deductible is $250 per claim. Again: This applies to any one incident, not per item.

SOLO Theatrical Insurance (stagelive.frontrowinsurance.com) deductibles:

The deductible for Each Occurrence is $500.

Event insurance (events.frontrowinsurance.com) deductibles:

  • Rented Equipment Coverage: $500 Per Claim
  • Rented Tents/Marquees: $250 Per Claim
  • Wedding Enhancement Package Coverages: $250 Per Claim
  • Birthday Party / Bar/Bat Mitzvah / Anniversary Package Coverages: $250 Per Claim
  • Cancellation Coverage: None
  • General Liability, Each Occurrence: $500 for claims of Bodily Injury / Property Damage
  • Tenant Legal Liability: $500 Per Claim

Workplace Office insurance (workplaceinsure.frontrowinsurance.com) deductibles:

There are various deductibles under the Workplace policy. The deductible will depend on the coverage. For example, the deductible for theft of office property is $500.

Cyber Hack insurance (hackinsure.frontrowinsurance.com) deductibles:

A basic cyber insurance policy would generally come along with a $1,000 deductible.

Get Insurance with Front Row

Whether you’re interested in film insurance, photography insurance, event insurance or another insurance product, consider Front Row Insurance for your insurance needs.


Related:

Topics: musical instrument insurance, Short Film Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, film insurance premium, Office Contents Insurance, Theatre Insurance, event insurance, photography insurance, DigiGear, Cyber Insurance

Insurance for Photos Booths | Photo Booth Insurance from Front Row

Posted by Grant Patten on Apr 24, 2020 7:06:42 AM

Insurance for Photos Booths | Photo Booth Insurance from Front Row

Insurance for Photos Booths | Photo Booth Insurance from Front RowSource: Royalty-free stock photo ID: 506775367, Shutterstock

We’re often asked, “does Front Row’s photography insurance program cover photo booths?” The answer is yes; it does, but within some narrow parameters explained below. We do not cover any and all photo booths – they have to be a certain kind of photo booth. Read on…

Front Row’s photo booth insurance | insurance for photo booths | insurance for photo booth business | photo booth business insurance

Photo booths are eligible for Front Row’s photography insurance program if:

  • the “booth” is not a physical room that people enter (but inflatable rooms are OK)
  • the photo booth equipment is not left unattended

There are no exceptions made for physical room-type booths.

Illustration of the kinds of photo booths covered & not covered:

Front Row’s photo booth insurance | insurance for photo booths

Why get photo booth insurance | insurance for photo booths?

Think nothing bad can happen to your photo booth? Well, think again! Front Row’s photography insurance program includes coverage for theft, damage, fire, and loss of use, and any of these unfortunate incidents could happen to a photo booth.

Photo booth insurance – theft

If your photo booth is stolen, insurance can replace it.

Photo booth insurance – fire

Fire is a scary thing – and although we certainly hope it doesn’t happen to your photo booth – one bad fire is capable of destroying a photo booth business very quickly.

Photo booth insurance – damage

If you’re a photo booth business owner, you’ve likely heard plenty of stories already about photo booth vandalism. Photo booths seem to be a preferred target of vandals, for whatever reason. But remember, as mentioned above, your photo booth cannot be left unattended if you expect insurance coverage.

There are other examples of damage that could happen even with a photo booth attendant present, though. What if you plug in the wrong power cord, leading to a short circuit, damaging your photo booth and maybe even the venue too? The venue owner could sue for damages. That’s where commercial general liability (CGL) coverage comes in handy…

Photo booth insurance – commercial general liability

CGL is included in Front Row’s photography insurance policy and it’s designed to protect against claims of bodily injury or property damage to third parties caused by your operations as a photographer (and/or photo booth business owner). It includes the cost of a lawyer to defend you.

What if, for example, you didn’t tape down your photo booth cord(s) sufficiently, and someone trips over a cord, injuring themselves, and they decide to sue?

Photo booth insurance – money & securities

Front Row’s photography insurance program includes money & securities coverage for up to $15,000 CAD. This covers against loss by theft or destruction of money & securities inside your premises.

Common photo booth insurance questions

Q. Where am I covered? Canada? US? Worldwide?

A. The basic policy provides coverage within Canada and the US only. For additional premium, coverage may be purchased on a Limited Worldwide basis – meaning the insurance applies anywhere in the world, except where the insurance carrier is legally prohibited from providing insurance.

Q. What about airplane travel with my photo booth – is that covered?

A. If you plan to travel outside of Canada/USA, you must choose the correct option to cover the number of days you intend to travel. Failure to do so would be considered misrepresenting a material fact, and would be grounds for denying coverage or cancelling your policy. If you do not yet know how long you will be travelling, or your plans change during the year, you can contact our office to add additional days’ coverage to your policy.

Q. What if my photo booth gets stolen from a vehicle? Is that covered?

A. Yes – under certain circumstances/criteria. Read our blog post "Theft from Vehicle" for a detailed answer to this question.

Any other questions? Please contact the Front Row office nearest you.

Photo booth accessories / photo booth propsSome photo booth accessories / photo booth props to consider

If you haven’t already acquired enough accessories for your photo booth, allow us to suggest a few that look pretty cool:

Get Photography Insurance | Photography Equipment Insurance | Front Row Photography | Photographer Insurance

Front Row’s insurance for photographers is a good option for insuring your photo booth if it does, indeed, meet the requirements outlined above. Many Canadian photographers have come to recognize Front Row as the industry’s best coverage – and rely upon us to protect their gear.

You can get a quote online, purchase a policy online in 5 mins, or read more about the coverages available on the photography insurance site.

Refer a Friend to Front Row Insurance

Based on customer demand, we’ve setup our referral marketing program and if you refer a friend to Front Row, you could win a $15 Amazon eGift Card OR be entered into a random draw to win a $99 Amazon eGift Card! (depending on your province)

 

Related posts:

What to Know About Rain Photography: Protecting Your Camera in Rain

Theft from Vehicle: Photography Insurance

DISCLAIMER: Informational statements regarding insurance coverage are for general description purposes only. These statements do not amend, modify or supplement any insurance policy. Consult the actual policy or your broker for details regarding terms, conditions, coverage, exclusions, products, services and programs which may be available to you. Your eligibility for particular products and services is subject to the final determination of underwriting qualifications and acceptance by the insurance underwriting company providing such products or services. This website does not make any representations that coverage does or does not exist for any particular claim or loss, or type of claim or loss, under any policy. Whether coverage exists or does not exist for any particular claim or loss under any policy depends on the facts and circumstances involved in the claim or loss and all applicable policy wording.

Amazon Associates Disclosure: Front Row Insurance is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. This post may contain affiliate links. There is no additional cost to you.

Citations:

https://www.catalinabloch.com/

Topics: photography insurance

Does film producer's E&O insurance protect against claims of breach of contract?

Posted by Kailin Che on Apr 21, 2020 8:00:30 AM

DOES film producer's E&O INSURANCE PROTECT AGAINST CLAIMS OF BREACH OF CONTRACT?

WHAT TO KNOW ABOUT IMPLIED-IN-FACT AGREEMENTS | IMPLIED CONTRACTS | IMPLIED TERMS

E&O INSURANCE FILM | ERRORS AND OMISSIONS INSURANCE FILM:


Kailin Che (Lawyer)
: An E&O policy does not cover claims relating to breaches of contract, e.g., if a producer breaches a contract provision with a writer, that won’t be covered by E&O insurance. There is a narrow exception to this rule and that’s in implied-in-fact agreements; those will be covered by E&O insurance.

So, a producer must assess whether or not there were any implied contracts that were established through conduct. Often, people think submission of an idea is sufficient to constitute implied-in-fact contracts; that’s not correct.

there are two clear requirements for establishing implied-in-fact contracts:

  1. the person who is sharing the idea must express the expectation to be compensated prior to sharing or if they share the idea.
  2. the recipient, e.g., the producer must know that there is this expectation of compensation and then voluntarily accepts the receipt of the idea.

So, in terms of limiting your potential liability in an implied-in-fact agreement, it’s possible if a producer ensures that every person who comes before them to submit any sort of idea signs an Idea Release Submission Form. [template credit: Early Sullivan Wright Gizer & McRae LLP]

 

Related:

About: Kailin Che is a corporate/commercial lawyer who represents clients in a broad range of industries including, technology, entertainment, manufacturing and real estate. She has advised clients on a variety of endeavors, including mergers and acquisitions, financing, reorganizations, corporate governance and regulatory compliance. Kailin began her legal career at a global law firm in Toronto and is licensed to practice in both Ontario and British Columbia.

Topics: Film Producer's E&O Insurance, Film Insurance claims

E&O considerations for US-based filmmaker vs. Canada-based filmmaker

Posted by Kailin Che on Apr 17, 2020 11:07:17 AM

Fair use vs. fair dealing

Are there different e&o considerations for a US-based filmmaker vs. a Canada-based filmmaker?

E&O INSURANCE FILM | ERRORS AND OMISSIONS INSURANCE FILM:


Kailin Che (Lawyer)
: There are definitely differences in the applicable laws affecting E&O considerations between US and Canada. A lot of these are nuanced, but to give you an example: we’re talking about exceptions under copyright infringement as set forth by the fair use doctrine and so in the US, the fair use doctrine is a lot broader than the Canadian fair dealing doctrine equivalent.

Copyright and fair use:

Under the US copyright law, they have a non-exhaustive list of potential purposes that could be used as an exception, e.g., if it’s a comment or criticism, or for the purpose of news reporting, these are all things that would NOT constitute an infringement on copyrighted material.

Fair dealing copyright | fair dealing guidelines | fair use fair dealing:

In Canada, we have a similar provision but an exhaustive list. So, it is limited to private study research, parody and satire, etc. So, the consequence of this is that, for producers, they might potentially be found to have infringed on copyrighted material in Canada, but perhaps they’re not infringing in the US.

So, that said: most people who are making films are distributing in Canada and the US anyway, so it’s important to be compliant with both sets of laws and regulations. And, typically, if you buy insurance in the US, it’ll cover Canada as well.

 

Related:

About: Kailin Che is a corporate/commercial lawyer who represents clients in a broad range of industries including, technology, entertainment, manufacturing and real estate. She has advised clients on a variety of endeavors, including mergers and acquisitions, financing, reorganizations, corporate governance and regulatory compliance. Kailin began her legal career at a global law firm in Toronto and is licensed to practice in both Ontario and British Columbia.

Topics: Film Producer's E&O Insurance, US Film insurance broker, Fair Use Doctrine

Intimacy Directors in the Theatre World

Posted by Lynne Godfroy on Apr 15, 2020 8:26:13 AM

Intimacy Directors in Theatre

Intimacy Directors in the Theatre World

Hiring an Intimacy Coach, or Intimacy Director (ID), as part of a theatre’s crew is becoming more common in Canadian theatrical circles, sparked by media attention to the vulnerability of women in the arts and entertainment sector.

What is an intimacy coach / intimacy director?

So what is the purpose of an Intimacy Director, and how can one be helpful to all members of a cast and crew, not just the female actors?

An ID’s job is to make the performers and crew feel protected while staging scenes that can create anxieties around the portrayal of acts of sexual violence, nudity, or other forms of intimacy. This is done when the ID establishes clear paths of communication for the rehearsal and show, and demonstrates best practices for creating a healthy performance space, as well as actually choreographing scenes of intimacy.

What does an intimacy coach / intimacy director do?

A first step for the coordinator is to have a conversation with the individuals closely involved in developing the scene, like the director and actor, to gauge feelings of concern. Under the pressure of landing and maintaining a job, it is too easy for artists to feel they have to agree to perform acts they aren’t comfortable with.

It is the ID’s role to establish confidence in the process and then choreograph the scene in a way which conveys the storyline without breaking the bond of trust between the director, actor, producer, and crew. This can be particularly important in the realm of live theatre as the performances must feel authentic each time the play is performed.

If the actor has felt psychologically pressured or even coerced into a place of discomfort, the acting and the entire production can suffer. The buffer that the ID provides is another step toward the smooth performances and safe sets theatrical producers need.

Pillars of Intimacy / Intimacy Coaches in Theatre

Siobhan Richardson, one of the founders of Intimacy Directors International (now closed), and her colleagues, have created a foundational piece called the Pillars of Intimacy. This material provides a step-by step process by which actors become educated to a practice that will guide them throughout rehearsal and performance.

The goal is to choreograph safe, repeatable movements that the actors can rely upon to tell the story. (TheatreArtLife) The Pillars of Intimacy establishes a process based on the best practices of context, communication, consent, choreography, and closure.

The Pillars of Intimacy can be a great guide for stage managers as well, if the budget doesn’t allow for the hiring of an ID for the production. Either way, it’s clear now that there is a new awareness of the risks involved if the behaviours around intimacy aren’t explored.

Consider Front Row Theatre Insurance | Performing Arts Insurance | Liability Insurance for Theatre Production Companies

Get a theatre insurance quote from Front Row in just 2 minutes: https://stagelive.frontrowinsurance.com/

Offering a simple and quick solution, our SOLO Theatrical Insurance program can be purchased online with a credit card in six minutes and can include the following coverage for up to 4-weeks with no minimum premium:

Refer a Friend to Front Row Insurance

Based on customer demand, we’ve setup our referral marketing program and if you refer a friend to Front Row, you could win a $15 Amazon eGift Card OR be entered into a random draw to win a $99 Amazon eGift Card! (depending on your province)

 

Citations:

Related:

THEATRE INSURANCE 101 / THEATRICAL INSURANCE / PERFORMING ARTS INSURANCE

MAKE A POTENTIAL DISASTER A MINOR INCONVENIENCE / THEATRE INSURANCE

BRITISH PANTOMIME AND THEATRE INSURANCE

FAMOUS STAGE DISASTERS / THEATRE INSURANCE

THEATRE INSURANCE - VENUES AND GROUPS / THEATRE COMPANY INSURANCE

4 EASY STEPS TO READING A THEATRE INSURANCE POLICY

CIRCUS INSURANCE

AERIAL INSURANCE / AERIAL ARTS INSURANCE

DANCE INSURANCE

OPERA INSURANCE

ACTONE INSURANCE / PERFORMERS INSURANCE

DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS (D&O) INSURANCE

CAST INSURANCE FOR LIVE PERFORMERS

INSURANCE FOR BODY PARTS / BODY PART INSURANCE

PROTÉGÉ: CUSTOM INSURANCE FOR ART SCHOOLS AND ARTS EDUCATORS

SAFEGUARDING YOUR STUDENTS WITH ART SCHOOL INSURANCE PART 1

SAFEGUARDING YOUR STUDENTS WITH ART SCHOOL INSURANCE PART 2

INTIMACY COACHES IN THE THEATRE WORLD / INTIMACY DIRECTORS

SHORT-TERM THEATRE INSURANCE / PUBLIC LIABILITY INSURANCE FOR PERFORMERS

Topics: Theatre Insurance, performance insurance

REAL ESTATE AGENTS: One mistake could cost your client their life savings.

Posted by Grant Patten on Apr 9, 2020 9:05:51 AM

REAL ESTATE AGENTS: One mistake could cost your client their life savings.

Real estate agents: get cyber insuranceEstate agents: Keep your clients smiling by having cyber coverage | Royalty-free stock photo ID: 402629167, Shutterstock

Don’t think a cyber hack could happen to your real estate agency? Well, think again!

STATISTIC: “Cyber scams targeting the real estate sector are on the rise. From 2015 to 2017, there was over a 1,100% rise in the number of cyber scam victims reporting the real estate transaction angle and an almost 2,200% rise in the reported monetary loss.” (FBI report, 2018)

Just look at the below real-life examples of real estate agency hacks to see how real this threat is:

The Oregon Homeowner, Colorado Couple & Russian Real Estate Agent:

Cyber criminals have developed a sneaky trick that has been fooling the customers of real estate agents into sending money to fraudulent bank accounts. How does the trick work? The criminals hack into real estate agents’ email accounts, then surreptitiously read the emails that are sent between buyer and agent. When the deal is close to being done, the hacker sends off a well-timed email, impersonating the agent, trying to fool the buyer into wiring money to an (often) offshore bank account. Sadly, the ploy has been working.

This happened in 2019 to a homeowner based in Portland, OR. He received an email instructing him to wire a $123K down payment to what he thought was a property title company. It turned out to be a swindle — the money he wired did not go to that company, but to an unknown bank account based in Florida. He lost the money.

In 2018, a Colorado couple were ready to finalize the purchase of their dream home, and at closing time wired $272K from their bank, following instructions they had received in an email from – they thought – their real estate settlement company. However, the company’s email account had been hacked, and fraudsters had altered the wiring instruction to make off with the hefty sum.

The couple eventually reached a confidential settlement in a lawsuit against their real estate agent, bank and settlement company.

A narrow escape happened in 2017 to a Russian real estate agent, based in California. Criminals hacked her Gmail account, monitored the correspondence between her and her clients, and waited for the perfect time to strike. It came time to send the remainder of a down payment to close escrow. Using the agent’s email account, the hackers sent a message to one of her clients telling them to wire hundreds of thousands to a fraudulent account. Lucky for the clients, they questioned the fake email. The amount requested was off by just a bit.

If this property title company and/or real estate agent had had cyber insurance, the cost of a forensic investigation would have been included to investigate how, exactly, the hack occurred and how to prevent it from happening again. The third-party cyber liability included in the policy would cover you against lawsuits from third parties due to a cyber attack on your business.

The New York Real Estate Companies

In 2019, a well-known real estate brokerage, based in New York, experienced a cyber hack. A confidential email containing agent splits, marketing budgets and gross commission income was sent to the entire company. This email was meant to be seen by only a few executives in the company.

The email account belonging to the president of sales was hacked and emails containing sensitive information were distributed within the company in a deliberate attempt to distract employees and agents, disrupt business and cause damage to the company. Some agents speculated foul play at the hands of a rival.

In 2015, a hacker breached the systems of another New York-based real estate company, this one in Manhattan. The hacker surreptitiously downloaded 798 of the company’s confidential reports worth $361,337 in total. The company charges $999 for a single report on commercial properties.

The company launched a lawsuit against the hacker, seeking to recover the money, as well as punitive damages.

With cyber liability insurance, first-party (you and your business) cyber crime expense coverage is included, as well as the cost of a forensic investigation to investigate how, exactly, a hack occurred. Theft and fraud coverage would also be included to cover destruction or loss of digital data resulting from a criminal cyber event.

WHAT IS CYBER INSURANCE | CYBER LIABILITY INSURANCE | CYBER SECURITY INSURANCE | CYBER RISK INSURANCE | HACK INSURANCE?

Cyber hack insurance for real estate agents is designed to protect them from certain losses associated with data breaches and hacks. After a hack, there are costs you will likely incur in:

  • notifying customers that their information has been stolen
  • paying to restore or recover the stolen data
  • paying for crisis communications and PR services related to the hack
  • paying to conduct an investigation to determine what happened
  • losing money from business interruption
  • paying for legal defense in any resulting lawsuits

SO, HOW CAN CYBER HACK INSURANCE HELP?

Hack insurance can help with expenses associated with managing a hack, such as incident response and data recovery expenses.

PROTECT your data: If you’re a real estate agent, your computer is likely one of the most important objects you own. You facilitate your deals on it and you likely have sensitive data stored on it.

Not only is your work stored on your computer, you may also have accounting and client information on there. If you suffer a hack, your insurance can help you manage the costs associated with the loss. Front Row's cyber hack insurance policy starts at just $300 CAD annually and includes comprehensive cyber coverage with limit options up to $1,000,000.

90% of small businesses in Canada do not have Cyber Insurance: take five minutes to protect your real estate agency that has taken you so long to establish.

Get a Quote Online In 2 Mins.

 

Citations:

https://www.ic3.gov/media/2018/180712.aspx
https://www.marketwatch.com/
https://miami.cbslocal.com/2017/09/20/real-estate-email-hacks/
https://www.mpamag.com/news/real-estate-company-gets-hacked-24332.aspx
https://phys.org/news/2018-09-hackers-real-estate-devastating-impact.html

DISCLAIMER: Informational statements regarding insurance coverage are for general description purposes only. These statements do not amend, modify or supplement any insurance policy. Consult the actual policy or your broker for details regarding terms, conditions, coverage, exclusions, products, services and programs which may be available to you. Your eligibility for particular products and services is subject to the final determination of underwriting qualifications and acceptance by the insurance underwriting company providing such products or services. This website does not make any representations that coverage does or does not exist for any particular claim or loss, or type of claim or loss, under any policy. Whether coverage exists or does not exist for any particular claim or loss under any policy depends on the facts and circumstances involved in the claim or loss and all applicable policy wording.

Topics: Cyber Insurance

Sustainable Sets & Green Filmmaking – The Future of Power in Film

Posted by Grant Patten on Apr 6, 2020 9:03:19 AM

Sustainable Sets & Green Filmmaking – The Future of Power in Film

Generator: Sustainable Sets & Green FilmmakingSource: Royalty-free stock photo ID: 657678478 (Shutterstock)

TRADITIONAL Generators for film production – the issues involved

Powering a film production is an expensive business. Your typical power set-up is a centralized grid, involving at least one or two 400A diesel generators. That number can rapidly rise to 20 on large, high-draw productions. This ‘overpowering’ of film sets has been the status quo for decades.

Diesel generators have made us pretty lazy with our math - we basically just add up the lights we have and supply enough power to turn them all on at once, all day long, with lots left over for heating up all the snacks”
Kerri Coombs, Vancouver Gaffer

A single generator emits a noise level of 73 decibels – louder than a standard vacuum cleaner – and 2.6 kg of CO2 per litre of diesel burned. As a result, they must be placed far enough from set to avoid being picked up by sound or damaging air quality and the health of the crew. This practice has a number of challenges.

Rigging crews spend days setting up hundreds of feet of three-phase seaway cable or 4/0 heavy gauge cable to transmit power to set, as well as mats to ensure traffic can pass over the cabling without damage. Due to the distances involved, this can lead to line loss and restricts set design to specific locations that allow access. Productions using generators must also procure costly permits and hire generator operators to bring in and monitor the units during shooting.

What’s more, even before the generator operators (a.k.a. Genny Ops) roll in the 400A generators to energize the grid, the pre-production crew often must use loud, noxious 6k and 2k gas generators for power until the diesel power grid is energized. All of this – the noise, the harmful fumes, the cabling and disruption – is in large part responsible for the growing friction between film crews and the residents of the world’s most famous film cities. This is leading to some neighbourhoods refusing permits for film crews to work there at all.

Powering the film industry’s grid with decentralized clean technology / Portable Electric / electric generators

Decentralization of the power grid is a growing trend within the film industry. Leading professionals, such as David Sinfield and his team – known for their work on No Time To Die, Wonder Woman and Venom 2 – have already moved to a hybrid model. This involves using a reduced number of 400A diesel generators to deliver overall set power, while bringing in clean battery electric generators for peripheral power loads and confined or restrictive locations.

As a result, teams around the world are achieving creative visions that would otherwise be prohibitively expensive or actually impossible. A recent example was found when a crew used Portable Electric’s VOLTstack 2k and 5k electric generators to create a 360° IMAX shot. Due to their emissions-free and silent nature, these units could be placed directly beside the Technocrane holding the camera. The production, in turn, saved the unnecessary double expense of laying out hundreds of feet of cable, only to paint it all out in the editor’s suite.

Some pioneering productions are going one step further by completely decentralizing their grids. A Vancouver-based indie production, The Victim, used only VOLTstack electric generators to park power wherever they needed it for everything from their video village and catering, to balloon lights and HMI lamps during a day and night shoot.

I had no problem convincing the producers this was a great idea. As far as producers are concerned, no cable, no noise, and instant power on demand is like a dream come true
– Kerri Coombs, gaffer on The Victim

This simply required a shift in their approach to energy budgeting. “The industry regularly uses 18,000 watt lights for night shooting, which is why most of the night scenes you see nowadays look weird and unnatural, with blue light where all the darkness should be,” explains Kerri.

Instead, they swapped conventional fixtures with LED Skypanels, a staple lighting solution that uses a fifth of the power while achieving the same effect as conventional fixtures. Consequently, not only did decentralizing their grid create huge cost savings on cabling, mats, fuel and production manpower, it also ensured they achieved a powerful creative vision.

The lighting looked great - we didn’t have to sacrifice production value to scale down our power needs. There were a lot of high fives.

Generators for film production / electric generators – risk management & insurance considerations

Whether you’re using a diesel or electric generator, there can be certain risks that come along with generator use on set. A specialized film insurance broker is best able to present the risks associated with your film production to the film insurance underwriter to ensure you receive the best coverage and premium for your production.

Front Row Insurance Brokers are specialized Film Insurance Brokers. Please contact us if you have any questions.

Guest post written by Lisa Gheysen, Copywriter, on behalf of Portable Electric Ltd.

About Portable Electric:

Portable Electric (PE) is a Vancouver-based tech disruptor that builds, rents and sells the VOLTstack Power Station, revolutionizing the way critical power is delivered. They provide film productions, event organizers, construction sites, disaster zones and more, an alternative to loud, noxious gas and diesel generators.

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Topics: Film insurance broker, film insurance underwriter, sustainability

The Best Budget Cameras for Filmmaking in 2020

Posted by Grant Patten on Apr 1, 2020 7:55:11 AM

BEST BUDGET CAMERAS FOR FILMMAKING

The Best Cameras for Filmmaking in 2020Source: Royalty-free stock photo ID: 685271140, Shutterstock

Let’s review some of the best budget, affordable cameras for filmmaking available on the market now. We’ll discuss:

THE BEST CAMERAS FOR FILMMAKING - Canon 90DCanon 80D and 90D DSLRs – affordable & excellent cameras for filmmaking / best DSLRs for filmmaking

The Canon 80D [Affiliate Link] is an excellent DSLR that offers a useful articulating screen and fast, precise autofocus in live view mode, making it great for video shooters. The colours look great, too.

The 90D [Affiliate Link] is the newer model, offering upgrades such as a higher-resolution sensor and a new electronic shutter/faster shutter speed (up to 1/16,000 second). For reference, here is an example video shot on the 90D:

 

The Canon EOS Rebel T7i [Affiliate Link] is another DSLR appropriate for filmmaking. If you purchase it as a kit, you can get a tripod, filters and other useful accessories included with it. It shoots HD 1080p video at 60fps and offers an HDR mode.

Arguably superior image quality to Canon DSLRs – Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera

As great as the Canon DSLRs are, through, some filmmakers argue that other brands offer superior image quality in this price range, such as the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera. [Affiliate Link] This camera shoots 4K 4096 x 2160 up to 60 fps with 13 stops of dynamic range. For reference, decide for yourself by comparing this Blackmagic footage to the Canon footage above:

The Blackmagic Pocket 4K has many great attributes, including:

  • Raw recording / great dynamic range (roughly 1 TB per hour of recording)
  • Apple ProRes 422 (HQ) at 220 Mbps
  • Great colour science
  • Great ISO range
  • Large screen

Panasonic G7 kit – great for low-budget filmmaking / best camera for filmmaking on a budget

With the Panasonic LUMIX G7 Mirrorless Camera and Accessory Bundle [Affiliate Link], you can get this camera with useful accessories included like a carrying case and memory card – all for under $750 CAD (at the time of this writing).

In the G line, filmmakers may also want to consider the GH5 [Affiliate Link]. This camera is a better choice if you want to look inconspicuous and do “run & gun” type work. And if you’re looking for cheaper options, the older models are still quite good filmmaking cameras, including the GH4.

The Panasonic LUMIX DMC-FZ1000 [Affiliate Link] may be considered for a “superzoom” option; this camera offers a high-res OLED viewfinder, 12 fps burst shooting and beautiful 4K video.

THE BEST CAMERAS FOR FILMMAKING - Sony A7 IIISony a77, Alpha A6400 and FDR-AX700

The Sony a7 III [Affiliate Link] is a camera to consider for filmmaking and videography as it lets you shoot 4K2 (3840x2160 pixels) up to 10 fps and customize a wide range of video-shooting options.

The Sony Alpha A6400 [Affiliate Link] is also an excellent filmmaking camera that shoots 4K video (24.2-megapixel APS-C size CMOS sensor). This camera has no record time limit!

The Sony FDR-AX700 camcorder [Affiliate Link] is another reasonably priced option that shoots 4K and HDR videos. This camera has incredibly fast, hybrid autofocus (AF) technology.

The Fujifilm X-T3 and X-T30

The Fujifilm X-T3 [Affiliate Link] camera is easy to use, provides great image quality (4K recording at 60p) and is small enough that it doesn't draw a lot of attention. If you want a camera that captures great video & photos, the Fuji X-T3 is ideal.

You could also go for the X-T30 [Affiliate Link], which is essentially a smaller, cheaper version of the X-T3. 4K recording is limited to 30p on the X-T30. The X-T30 is reported (The Verge) to have a better autofocus system than the X-T3, though.

THE BEST CAMERAS FOR FILMMAKING - DJI Osmo PocketBest compact camera / best small camera for filmmaking – the DJI Osmo Pocket

If you need a really small and compact camera that can still record amazing image quality (RAW format photos and D-Cinelike videos), check out the DJI Osmo Pocket. [Affiliate Link] It can shoot 4K/60fps video at 100 mbps.

This camera is a popular choice for vloggers and travellers.

 

More of an investment – Professional cinema cameras / cine cameras

If you’re able to spend more, consider getting a cine camera / cinema camera, such as the Canon EOS C300 MK II [Affiliate Link] or the Canon EOS C200 [Affiliate Link]. Cinema cameras are designed to capture video with a dynamic range that matches or exceeds that of film: ~13 stops or so.

A key advantage most cine cameras have is continuous recording time – they’re generally able to record a lot longer without pausing. DSLRs usually have a 29:59 single recording max length timer.

The Sony PXW-FS5 [Affiliate Link] is a great “run & gun” cinema camera. It can shoot 4K RAW (records data directly from the sensor) and capture continuous HD video at up to 120 fps.

Get DigiGear Insurance | Film Equipment Insurance | Film Gear Insurance | Sound & Lighting Equipment Insurance

If you end up buying any of these above cameras (or any other gear) – you’ll want to have the right insurance coverage in place to protect that valuable gear.

Front Row’s DigiGear insurance policy is a good option for insuring your filmmaking gear, including your film camera(s). You can get a quote online, purchase a policy online in 5 mins, or read more about the coverages available here: https://digigearinsure.frontrowinsurance.com/

Refer a Friend to Front Row Insurance

Based on customer demand, we’ve setup our referral marketing program and if you refer a friend to Front Row, you could win a $15 Amazon eGift Card OR be entered into a random draw to win a $99 Amazon eGift Card! (depending on your province)

Related posts:

HOW TO PROTECT YOUR CAMERA LENS(ES)

PREVENTING FILM EQUIPMENT THEFT – TIPS & TRICKS

HOW TO CHOOSE BETWEEN A DICE INSURANCE POLICY AND A DIGIGEAR POLICY?

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Topics: DigiGear