How to choose between a DICE Insurance Policy and a DigiGear Policy?

Posted by Grant Patten on Nov 11, 2019 12:33:21 PM

HOW TO CHOOSE BETWEEN A DICE POLICY AND A DIGIGEAR POLICY?

DICE (docs, corporate videos, commercials, educational films, music videos)

The DICE Package Policy is intended to provide insurance for smaller budget documentaries, corporate videos, commercials, educational films, music videos and more. DICE is best suited for producers who are planning to produce projects other than feature films or TV series.

DICE can provide coverage for a full year for rented & owned equipment as well as Props, Sets and Wardrobe, Office Contents, Vehicle Physical Damage and more. Commercial General Liability coverage can also be purchased either together with the equipment coverage or on a standalone basis. If you would like more information or to request a free non-obligation quote, visit our DICE Policy website here. If you are a US based Producer, click here instead.

A DICE policy is available in ~4 hours by calling or emailing our office.

DigiGear (film equipment)

The DigiGear Policy is intended for owners of camera equipment, sound, lighting and other film equipment. All equipment is covered for: theft, damage, fire and loss of use. Like DICE, the DigiGear policy term is also for 12 months. A DigiGear policy is designed to cover owners/operators of production equipment whose operations or services fall within one of the below classifications:

  • Camera Operator
  • Director of Photography (DP) / Cinematographer
  • Videographer
  • Sound Recordist
  • Digital Imaging Technician
  • Grip

Unlike DICE, DigiGear is not a film production policy.

A DigiGear policy is available online in ~five minutes 24/7.
Note: coverage under DigiGear is only available to Canadian residents at this time.

For a visual overview of the two policies, view the infographic below:

DICE vs. DigiGear infographic

RELATED POST:

HOW TO CHOOSE BETWEEN A DICE POLICY AND A SHORT SHOOT POLICY*

 

Topics: Documentary Insurance, DICE Insurance, digigear, Film equipment rental insurance, corporate video insurance, music video insurance, Educational Film Insurance

Filmmakers and Insurance: What Moves You

Posted by Casey Budden on Nov 5, 2018 11:59:13 AM

Movie fans in theatre.


What Moves You?

More than 100 years after their invention, “moving pictures” still seem to command our collective imagination. We often have very personal emotional attachments to movies: we say that certain films inspired us, moved us, shaped our childhood, shocked us, or opened our minds.

What is unique about the medium of film? What explains this continuing fascination despite all the other technological delectations our age offers up? Is it because film promises us a total escape from the everyday? Provides deep insight into the human condition? Or is it simply good entertainment?

Probably, it’s all of the above. 2017’s total box office results were the highest in history, with over $39 billion in takings worldwide despite the fact that public attention is more divided than ever, with video games, streaming services, and downloads all vying for a slice of their entertainment dollars. Clearly, movies aren’t going anywhere.

What is changing is the way content is delivered. Creators are both rapidly influencing, and being influenced by, new technologies. This is not anything new: the history of film is one of periodic disruption followed by renewal in response to the changing tastes of audiences.

Early “talkies,” which began to appear in the mid-to-late 1920s, were often compared uncharitably to earlier, silent films. Critics often felt that the spoken dialogue made for tawdry, artistically inferior pictures. Audiences loved them, however, and by the early 1930s, the majority of films were being produced with sound.

Starting around the same time and lasting until the late 1940s was the Hollywood “studio system”—a system of production characterized by complete vertical integration of the production process. The studio system totally dominated filmmaking during this period. Studios “owned” talent, cast was repertory, and filming was done mainly on elaborate sets or backlots rather than on location. Props and sets were also frequently recycled through various productions. Many venues were owned by studios, who could thus control when, where, and for how long a film screened. Theatres that were not studio-owned were subject to a practice called “block booking” in which they were required to take on and screen entire slates of lesser-quality films from a studio in order to obtain screening rights to a single anticipated hit. (This is where the term “B movie” comes from).

As might be expected, this arrangement provided steady and reliable revenue for the studios. The big stars of the time were household names. Studios were nicknamed “Dream Factories” due to their ability to quickly churn out genre favorites—westerns, musicals, romances. Fantasy and spectacle were favored over realism, and audiences gobbled them up. But new technology was already sowing the seeds of change: the rapidly growing popularity of television, as well as a landmark antitrust case in 1948 which forbade studios from owning movie theatres and curtailed the practice of block booking, placed the film business on shaky ground by mid-century. The severe slump which ensued was not truly reversed until 1972, the year The Godfather was released.

The collapse of the studio system was both good and bad. As major studios were no longer guaranteed a theatrical release for their films, they became more risk-averse, tending to focus on properties they knew would make money. On the other hand, the proliferation of smaller studios and the uncoupling of distribution from production allowed many up-and-coming directors to make their mark. The 1970s ushered in the emergence of a raft of American auteur directors—Robert Altman, Martin Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola, Roman Polanski, and Stanley Kubrick among them. These directors were influenced by European art-house cinema of the 50s and 60s and approached filmmaking with a markedly different aesthetic. Their films featured greater realism and frequently controversial subject matter. Like their European contemporaries from decades past, more scenes were shot on location. Dialogue was less frequently dubbed. Increased emphasis was placed on characterization and dialogue.

Simultaneously, and progressing in a completely opposite artistic direction, another trend was taking shape: the “Hollywood blockbuster.” Designed to maximize ticket sales for large studios, these films featured larger-than-life spectacle and action, supported by cutting-edge technology and special effects. Star Wars (1977) represents the most obvious example of this phenomenon. Audiences flocked to the cinema for the first time in decades to be part of an experience they could not replicate with equipment available at home. The modern action-adventure spectacle was born (and continues, in the guise of the ubiquitous superhero movie).

The 1980s accelerated these changes in filmmaking. Major studios could no longer afford to back a loser, so often doubled down on grand special-effects laden productions that audiences would be guaranteed to love, or else reliable franchises such as Rocky, Rambo, Indiana Jones, Friday the 13th,, A Nightmare on Elm Street, etc. The advent of home video technologies such as VHS and Betamax meant that a significant proportion of a film’s income now came not from box office, but home video revenues. This further opened up the playing field, as it was now economically viable for a small independent producer to market their film “direct-to-video” and make a profit.

Cut to the present day where, in addition to the multiplex, you can now watch a film on your phone, tablet, smart TV, portable music player, or game console. Streaming services are the latest disruptive innovation and have changed the way episodic TV content, for example, is presented (no more “previously on…” and no more commercials). It’s arguably never been easier for a creator to get their work out there.

Audiences flocked to the “dream factories” of the Golden Age of Cinema because there’s no magic like film magic. This hasn’t changed, and we don’t think it ever will. Film is the only medium that has the ability to inspire both our intellects and our hearts while completely engaging our senses.

At Front Row Insurance, we are “Passionate about the arts…better at insurance.” We love creatives and the creative work that they do. That’s what moves us. What moves you? Whatever it is, we probably have a policy that will suit you. Contact us.

Topics: Entertainment Insurance, E&O Insurance, Public Liability Insurance for Film, Film Location Insurance, insurance for film set, Film Extra Expense, Educational Film Insurance, film school insurance, pre production insurance for filmmakers

How to choose between a DICE Policy and a Short Shoot policy*

Posted by David Hamilton on Sep 22, 2017 4:56:00 PM

HOW TO CHOOSE BETWEEN A DICE POLICY AND A SHORT SHOOT POLICY*

A Short Shoot Policy is intended for those producers who are conducting shoots lasting 15 days or less, using rented equipment and with budgets of $250,000 or less. This makes it ideal for short film producers, student projects or anyone else who will be filming on a short term basis and requires insurance. Equipment coverage can apply to any rented film production equipment as well as rented props, sets and wardrobe up to the specified policy limits. Commercial General Liability coverage can also be purchased either together with equipment coverage or on a standalone basis. If you would like a free non-obligation quote or to purchase coverage, visit our Short Shoot policy website here. *Currently we are only able to provide this coverage to Canadian Producers. If you require this coverage from outside of Canada please contact your local Front Row office for assistance.

The Dice Package Policy is intended to provide insurance for documentaries, corporate videos, commercials, educational films music videos and more. It is best suited for producers who are planning to produce projects other than feature films or TV series. This can provide coverage for a full year for Rented and Owned equipment as well as Props, Sets and Wardrobe, Office Contents, Vehicle Physical Damage and more. Commercial General Liability coverage can also be purchased either together with the equipment coverage or on a standalone basis. If you would like more information or to request a free non-obligation quote, please visit our DICE Policy website here. If you are a US based Producer please click here instead.

For more information, view the infographic below:

DICE - Short Shoot Infographic (Canada).jpg

 

related post:

How to choose between a DICE Insurance Policy and a DigiGear Policy?

 

Topics: Short Film Insurance, Commercial Production Insurance, Documentary Insurance, DICE Insurance, Film equipment rental insurance, corporate video insurance, music video insurance, Educational Film Insurance

The Annual Film Production Insurance Package Made Easy

Posted by David Hamilton on Sep 13, 2017 4:46:15 PM

The Annual DICE Insurance Policy takes the hassle out of purchasing film insurance for your film productions. It is flexible, affordable, and customizable designed to fit your individual needs. 

This policy will not only save you time, it will also save you money. Insuring all your productions under one policy helps to cut the costs, as it will reduce the administrative expenses associated with insuring each production individually, and these savings are passed onto you.

The Annual DICE Policy is specially designed to provide:  insurance for commercials, documentary insurance, coporate video insurance,educational film insurance, music video insurance, training video insurance, short film insurance, and still photography insurance.

Check out our Infographic below for coupon savings and more.

DICE Infographic Hyperlink.jpg

Interested in seeing more? Visit the Front Row Insurance Website for a free no obligation quote!

Topics: Short Film Insurance, Film Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, Commercial Production Insurance, Documentary Insurance, DICE Insurance, corporate video insurance, music video insurance, Educational Film Insurance

QU'EST-CE QU'UNE POLICE D' Assurance ANUELLE DE FILM?

Posted by Meghan Stickney on Aug 13, 2014 3:27:00 PM

describe the image

 

C’ est une  police film d’assurance  pour gagner du temps et de l'argent si vous prévoyez plusieurs projets au cours des 12 prochains mois. 

La police d’assurance «dice» signifie et couvre:

Documentaires, vidéos corporatifs , commerciaux,  films éducatifs. Il couvre également les Clips et le court métrage.

Exclut *: budget de plus 150.000 en  long métrage ou  / Télévision 

- Série télévisée ou épisodes

- Productions avec des périodes de tournage de  + 90 Jours.

(* sauf indication pour approbation  et, dans certains cas, une prime supplémentaire s'applique)

 

Une police assurance anuelle de film offre une couverture préétabli pour un an pour votre bureau et tous vos productions - à l'exception des films  et des séries avec des budgets plus de $ 150,000.

Nous allons vous fournir  des certificats en blanc pour l'année, ce qui vous permet de reserver  les endroits et louer du matériel à la dernière minute .

Responsabilité civile générale est moins cher avec une police  annuelle  parce que vous ne payez qu’ une fois par an et couvre l'ensemble de vos projets dans une période de 12 mois. Beaucoup moins de travail et à moindre  coût de pour la couverture de chacun de vos projets.

Un police  typique d'un producteur avec  250.000 dollars  de productions annuelles  est la suivante:

 COUVERTURE  
 LIMITE $ 
 Film négatif / Videotape   250,000
 Stock défectueux, camera , Développement     250,000
 Accessoires, décors et costumes    200,000
 Matériel loué  divers  750,000

 Matériel divers vous appartenant

(prime supplémentaire s'appliquera) 

 Comme Requis 
 Responsabilité pour dommages aux biens  2,000,000
 Frais supplémentaires   200,000
 Contenu de bureau  100,000
 Débiteurs  25,000
 Argent et valeurs  25,000
 Dommages causés à des véhicules  150,000 par véhicule  
 Responsabilité civile générale   2,000,000

 

Coûts: 

  • Une prime de dépôt débute à 1500 $. 

  • Vos coûts finaux de productions brutes pour toutes les productions réalisées pendant la durée de la police  sont signalés à la Société dans les 30 jours suivant l'expiration ou la résiliation de la couverture. 

  • La prime annuelle gagnée est calculée en appliquant le taux par 100 $ de coûts de production réels bruts établis à la date de création de la police
  • Une prime minimum de 1500 $ sera applicable quels que soient les termes de couverture. 

  • Les primes peuvent être financés sur l'année pour aider votre flux de trésorerie. 

  • Nos taux  varient  en fonction du rapport Film / Vidéo, types de productions et le nombre de productions annuelles estimées. 

  • La couverture de responsabilité générale (pour couvrir les lieux de tournage  contre les dommages matériels ou corporels causés par votre équipe) est en sus. Par exemple, une limite $ 2,000,000 coûterait $ 750 par an; une limite $ 500,000  coûterait $ 1000 par an. 

Appelez-nous ou envoyez-nous un courriel pour une soumission  une description de la couverture demandée ainsi que  de plus amples informations. 

EN SAVOIR PLUS

 

Topics: Film equipment insurance, Film insurance broker, Entertainment Insurance Broker, Commercial Production Insurance, Documentary Insurance, DICE Insurance, Industrial Films, Educational Film Insurance

How a Specialized Film Insurance Broker can help your Production

Posted by David Hamilton on Apr 10, 2012 5:54:00 PM

How a film insurance broker helps

Film InsuranceA broker will help identify the risks associated with a production. Once the risks are identified, the risk can be transferred to an insurance company for a fee or premium. The film insurance broker negotiates the lowest possible premium and the broadest coverage available in the market place. In Canada, there are four film insurance companies: Chubb, Fireman’s Fund, Premiere and Travelers. Front Row is able to provide you with a quote from each of these companies in an easy to understand comparison format.

Unlike insurance agents - who work for the insurance company -  Insurance Brokers work for the client. Insurance brokers are recognized by law as experts in insurance. Insurance Brokers in Canada must pass a series of exams in order to be licensed and there is annual continuing education to maintain a license. Make sure your broker is licensed in the province that you are shooting your production or the production could be fined or subject to a surtax.

Insurance Brokers owe a higher duty of care to their clients than an Insurance Agent. Brokers represent the interests of their clients, not the insurance companies. They offer professional advice in arranging insurance on behalf of their clients.

Since insurance brokers are considered under the law as professionals, they are responsible for their actions and can be sued for professional negligence if their advice is deemed to be faulty. All licensed brokers therefore need to carry professional Errors and Omissions coverage. You should ask your broker the limit of E&O insurance that they cover:  $1,000,000 may not be enough once defense costs are deducted from the limit.

The many roles of a broker include: 

  • Negotiate with the insurance companies on behalf of clients. There are four insurance companies in Canada: an Insurance broker must be familiar with what these companies offer so that the best price and coverage is procured for the producer.
  • Brokers facilitate claims - Because the broker works on behalf of the client, it is their duty to ensure that insurance companies pay the full amount of the claim that the client is entitled to.
  • The broker acts as a conduit for communication between the insurance company and the client. This includes providing certificates for banks, bonding companies and locations to evidence coverage allowing banks to release funds to the client, locations to be locked by the location manager and equipment to be rented.
  • Advise clients on ways to limit potential liabilities during production.
  • Review scope of the client's existing insurance policies to reveal gaps or deficiencies in the coverage.
  • Comprehensive examination of the clients production to assess the amount and type of insurance required. A broker will also help the client understand what coverage they have and do not have and they can explain any limits to the coverage.

It is important to deal with a broker that understands the specific language shown on Film Production Policies. For this reason, it is strongly suggested that you seek out a specialized Film Insurance Broker when you need insurance for your production.

Related post: How to choose the right film insurance broker

Topics: Film equipment insurance, Short Film Insurance, Film Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, Film insurance broker, Entertainment Insurance Broker, Film Production Insurance Premiums, Film Production, E&O Insurance, Multimedia Risk Insurance, Film Insurance claims, Canadian Insurance Broker, Film Production Equipment, Film production offices, Commercial Production Insurance, Documentary Insurance, DICE Insurance, Film Production Companies, Cast Insurance, Educational Film Insurance

Bears and Film Insurance: What to Ask?

Posted by David Hamilton on Dec 8, 2011 10:26:00 AM

animal film insurance

ANIMAL INSURANCE ON FILM SETS

Bears are frequently used in film productions shot in the Pacific Northwest. The risks associated with filming a bear can be transferred to an insurance company once the underwriter understands how the public, cast, crew, equipment and the  bear will be protected.
 
The underwriter will need answers to the following questions to underwrite and cover the risk:
  1. Current Bear Vet exam certificates. What is the value of the bear to the owner if the bear were to die? Usually the figure is  based on three years revenue that the bear has earned.
  2. How will the bear get from their pen/corral to their position on set in the electrified fenced area? How will the cast and crew be protected during this transit?
  3. Where will the bear be on set when not filming? During this time, how will cast/crew/public be protected?
  4. When bear is on set and filming, what do they do to protect public/cast/crew from bear?
  5. Please confirm cast not in direct contact with the bear. Will the cast always be on one side of the electrified fence and the bear on the other?
  6. Please provide shooting schedule with the bear.
  7. Please forward storyboards of bear scenes when available.
  8. Given the time of year, are there any issues resulting from the bear normally hibernating during this time of year?
  9. Details of housing and transit of the bears from the permanent home.
  10. The main corral  structure to house the bear – is this a permanent structure? What will it be constructed of?  How high will the fence be?
  11. Will the bears be housed over night at the corral?
  12. What type of security will be in place?
  13. Will there be 24 hour attendants for the bear?
  14. How will the bears be shipped to the set from out of town?
  15. How are the protected during shipping?

As specialized film insurance brokers we can assist with obtaining this coverage.

Click me

 

Topics: Film equipment insurance, Short Film Insurance, Film Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, Film insurance broker, Entertainment Insurance Broker, Film Production Insurance Premiums, Film Production, Film Insurance claims, Film Producers, Commercial Production Insurance, Documentary Insurance, SPFX Insurance, DICE Insurance, Commercials, animal insurance, Educational Film Insurance

DigiGear Film Production Equipment Insurance from Front Row Insurance

Posted by David Hamilton on Sep 27, 2011 11:33:00 AM

DigiGear Film production equipment insuranceDigiGear Film production equipment insurance

Film production equipment insurance is available from Front Row Insurance.  We are specialized film insurance brokers with three offices in Canada.

Film gear insurance can be arranged quickly through us, usually over the phone.  Our program is very popular with new and established film makers because of the low cost and the simple process to arrange a policy. We can cover both owned gear and rented gear.

The fastest way to receive a quote is to complete the short application telling us about your gear on the short application HERE.  We will then call or email you with the cost within one business day or sooner. 

We can provide you with film equipment coverage with limits ranging between $5,000 and $10,000,000.  Premiums start at $75.

If you would like to add location liability, we can do so for an additional premium.  

We can also provide coverage for: 

  • Reshooting your lost or damaged data or film stock
  • Production Office
  • Rented Vehicle
  • Rented props, rented sets, rented wardrobe
  • Cast
  • And more-just ask.

If you would like an annual policy to cover multiple small productions as well as providing coverage for your gear, please click this link to take you to our D.I.C.E. (Documentaries, Industrial Films, Commercials, Educational Films – it also covers short shoots, music videos and feature films with low budgets) To obtain a quote, Click Here.

Our service is friendly and knowledgeable: please contact us.

Topics: Film equipment insurance, Film insurance broker, Entertainment Insurance Broker, Film Production Equipment, Commercial Production Insurance, Documentary Insurance, Film Equipment, Educational Film Insurance

Film Production Insurance: Why it is Needed.

Posted by David Hamilton on Jan 11, 2010 9:28:00 AM

Film Production Insurance: Why it is needed.

Production insurance is vital to financing your project. Why is insurance needed for your production? Three basic reasons are:  legal, contractual and property protection.

LEGAL REASON

As for legal reasons, nearly every  location and financier requires that a production company/filmmaker carry some form of insurance. A good example of this is the need for general liability insurance to cover property damage and and bodily injury to third parties. A building owner will want to be protected for any damage caused to the location. The building owner would also want to be protected from any lawsuits brought forth from a passerby that tripped on electrical cables or from injuries sustained by gear that falls off a roof.

CONTRACTUAL REASON

The contractual reason is simple. If you are under contract with a broadcaster or distributor, most likely the contract will require you to have insurance coverage before you can access your payment draw-downs.

PROPERTY REASON

The property protection covers you against damage and loss to assets like production equipment that you are contractually responsible for as set out in your rental agreement with the rental company. 

TYPES OF FILM POLICIES

The type of policy you need depends on the type of project you plan to make. If you are making a short music video, the type of policy you want will differ from a filmmaker who aims to make a feature film. There are basically three types: short-term, annual DICE Insurance and annual.

  • Short-term policies are used for single production, such as a commercial.
  • A DICE Insurance Policy is used for several projects during a year period. DICE stands for Documentaries, Industrial Films, Commercials and Educational Films.

Try to give your broker three to five days to arrange the coverage for you: this will ensure your broker has enough time to obtain the best price and coverage available in the marketplace.

The three policies you need to consider for any film production are:

General Liability Insurance

CGL covers against damage to the filming location/space, and injury or harm to those present that are not working on the film.

Equipment Insurance

Equipment insurance covers any and all film equipment used in your filmmaking process and production. This policy will cover loss, damage, theft, etc. to your rented or owned equipment.

Errors and Omissions Insurance

This type of insurance protects against lawsuits alleging unauthorized usage of titles, copyrighted materials, ideas, formats, characters, plots, plagiarism, unfair competition, defamation and invasion of privacy. E&O insurance requires the counsel of an entertainment lawyer who will review your script, clearances and releases.

 

RELATED LINKS:

Film Insurance 101 & How to Protect Your Film Project

Film Production Insurance: Why it is needed

Pre-Production Insurance

Film Production Insurance

How the Premium is Determined

Short Film Insurance

DigiGear Insurance

Props/Sets/Wardrobe Insurance

E&O Insurance

DICE Insurance

Third Party Property Damage

Crew Vehicles

Umbrella Vs. Excess Liability

Commercial General Liability

Negative Film / Videotape and Faulty Stock

Workers Comp

Cast Insurance

Extra Expense (EE)

Foreign Locations

Claims

Topics: Film Insurance, Film insurance broker, E&O Insurance, Film Production Equipment, Commercial Production Insurance, Documentary Insurance, DICE Insurance, Commercials, Industrial Films, Educational Film Insurance

What is a DICE Policy? - Let Front Row Tell You

Posted by Meghan Stickney on Oct 29, 2009 4:20:00 PM

DICE INSURANCE: DOCS, INDUSTRIAL, COMMERCIAL, EDUCATIONAL FILMS

This is a great insurance policy to save you time and money if you anticipate multiple projects in the next 12 months.

Click here to apply online

Excludes*:

- Feature Length or Theatrical/Television Release over $150,000 budget

- Television Series or Episodes

- Productions with shooting periods +90 Days

(*unless specifically endorsed and in some cases an additional premium applies)

  • A DICE policy provides prearranged coverage for a year for your office and all of your productions--except for features and series with budgets over $150,000.
  • We will give you blank certificates for the year, allowing you to lock locations and rent equipment on the fly.
  • General Liability is less expensive with an annual policy as you only pay for it once per year and it covers all of your projects in a 12 month period. Less work and cost than arranging coverage for each of your projects.

A typical package for a Canadian producer with up to $250,000 in annual productions costs is as follows: 

 COVERAGE  
 LIMIT  $  
 Negative Film/Videotape   250,000
 Faulty Stock, Camera & Processing     250,000
 Props, Sets & Wardrobe  200,000
 Miscellaneous Equipment Rented  750,000

 Miscellaneous Equipment Owned (additional premium will apply)

 As Required
 Property Damage Liability  2,000,000
 Extra Expense  200,000
 Office Contents  100,000
 Accounts Receivable  25,000
 Money & Securities  25,000
 Physical Damage to Vehicles  150,000 per vehicle 
 General Liability  2,000,000

 
Canadian DICE Production Insurance Package Costs:

  • A deposit premium starts at $1,500.
  • Your Final Gross Productions Costs for all productions undertaken during the term of the policy are reported to the Company within 30 days following the expiration or termination of coverage.
  • The Annual Earned Premium is computed by applying the rate per $100 of actual gross production costs established at the inception date of the policy.
  • A minimum premium of $1,500 will apply regardless of the terms of coverage.
  • Premiums can be financed over the year to help your cash flow.
  • Rating will vary based on the Film/Video ratio, types of productions and number of annual productions estimated.
  • General Liability coverage (to cover locations against property damage or bodily injury caused by your crew) is extra.  For example, a $2,000,000 limit would cost $750 annually; a $500,000 limit costs $1,000 annually.

 Click here to apply online

 Call or email us for a quote, a description of coverage  and further information.

Related BLOG Posts:

DICE Insurance Policies: Annual Protection for Multiple Film Projects

DICE vs. SHORT SHOOT

DICE vs. DigiGear

RELATED LINKS:

Film Insurance 101 & How to Protect Your Film Project

Film Production Insurance: Why it is needed

Pre-Production Insurance

Film Production Insurance

How the Premium is Determined

Short Film Insurance

DigiGear Insurance

Props/Sets/Wardrobe Insurance

E&O Insurance

DICE Insurance

Third Party Property Damage

Crew Vehicles

Umbrella Vs. Excess Liability

Commercial General Liability

Negative Film / Videotape and Faulty Stock

Workers Comp

Cast Insurance

Extra Expense (EE)

Foreign Locations

Claims

Topics: Film equipment insurance, Film insurance broker, Entertainment Insurance Broker, Commercial Production Insurance, Documentary Insurance, DICE Insurance, Industrial Films, Educational Film Insurance