Video: How do I add an additional insured to my policy?

Posted by Grant Patten on Oct 31, 2019 12:08:26 PM

How do I add an additional insured to my policy?


Instructions for issuing blank certificates.

If you’re applying for a permit to film or photograph on location, or host an event, you may have been asked to provide a certificate of insurance that adds an “additional insured” to your policy.

Adding additional insureds to your policy is actually really easy, especially with the tools that Front Row provides you.

First: I’m going to explain how to add an additional insured to your policy using Front Row’s blank certificate. If you just want to fill out the paperwork and get that permit, this is as far as you’ll need to watch. Second: I’ll explain what it means to add an additional insured to your policy.

How do you add an additional insured?

Most of the policies that you can buy through Front Row’s website come with something called a blank certificate of insurance. This is included along with the documents you receive by email when you purchase a policy with us. It’s sent to you as an attached PDF.

You will also receive a PDF with instructions on how to issue blank certificates. The blank certificate is a fillable form that you can use to issue your own certificates. If you open the blank certificate, you’ll see a fillable field at the top where you can add the Name and Address of the person or entity who you’re issuing the certificate to.

To add a person, company, city, or government agency as an additional insured to your policy, copy & paste their name and address into the fillable “issued to” field.

Then print a copy of the PDF so it can no longer be altered. Give the certificate holder or permitting office their copy, and send a copy to our office so we know who you’ve issued certificates to. Email the copy to: certificates@frontrowinsurance.com

That’s it! You’ve just added an additional insured to your policy. You don’t need to get our approval or wait for any confirmation on our end. Front Row’s blank certificates are quick and easy, giving you the freedom and flexibility to provide the insurance documents you need to secure location permits or rent out venues or equipment.

Now, I should add one caveat. The blank certificate form will work in most cases, but occasionally, you may have to contact our office to get a custom certificate prepared. Some organizations want to see specific wording on their certificates that doesn’t appear on the blanks. If you’re not sure if you will need custom wording, try the blank certificate form first. If they reject it, then contact our office.

Related Video:

What does it mean to add an additional insured to my policy?

Topics: Film Insurance, photography insurance, Additional Insured

Preventing Film Equipment Theft – Tips & Tricks

Posted by Grant Patten on May 7, 2019 6:38:08 AM

All this lovely gear was stolen! Don’t let this be your gear. All this lovely gear was stolen! Don’t let this be your gear.

Thanks to cooperation between the FBI, the US embassy and Argentinian federal police, this massive haul of film production gear worth ~$3M was recovered in September 2018. The thieves had apparently targeted equipment in Hollywood and other US cities and then smuggled it into Argentina. As of May 2019, four people have been arrested in the US and 17 suspects have been identified in Argentina.

Film Equipment Theft – Prevention Tips

We’ve provided some tips & tricks for how to guard your film equipment, as well as some information on how to insure your equipment so you are protected in any worst case scenario situations.

1. Exterior/Location Filming

  • Key individuals should be responsible and accountable for transporting equipment from trucks and trailers to the filming set/location
  • There should be a tracking process established for logging equipment in/out when transported between destinations
  • Securely store equipment when not in use, especially hard-to-replace items like custom props, sets and wardrobes
  • Station security personnel within sight of exposed equipment, ideally at all times
  • Heighten security presence whenever filming in crime-ridden neighbourhoods

2. Interior Filming

  • Always favour buildings that have a central security alarm system, and check with building facilities that the system is actually running properly
  • Favour buildings that have security guard personnel on site
  • The building ideally has a concierge who facilitates logging in/approval of visitors
  • If you need to store equipment in the building overnight, double-check that the room is secure and inform security personnel about it

3. Employee/Crew Theft

  • Have written policy in place informing cast/crew that it is unacceptable to take any objects from set as “souvenirs”; clearly communicate policy to cast/crew
  • Conduct reference/background checks on all new employees/crewmembers
  • All employees/crewmembers should wear highly visible ID badges while on set
  • Make use of sign-in/sign-out sheets for entering/exiting locations
  • Conduct inventory checks on regular basis

4. Vehicles (including rental cars, vans and trucks)

  • Ensure vehicles transporting valuable equipment are as nondescript as possible (don’t call attention to the vehicles)
  • Any equipment stored in a vehicle should always be locked and kept out of sight (e.g., covered with blankets)
  • Ideally have multiple drivers available to limit the number of extended stops and take turns monitoring the vehicle during stops
  • If overnight: ideally stay at reputable hotels; hotel parking lots should be well-lit and monitored by cameras and security guards

5. Air Travel (planes carrying production equipment)

  • Always have a clearly marked luggage tag and have a card with emergency contact information placed inside the luggage/container
  • Whenever possible, carry some valuable items onto the plane instead of checking them in, such as laptops and smaller cameras
  • Maintain an inventory listing the shipped items, along with planned shipping itinerary and equipment serial numbers

Consider Film Equipment Insurance – DigiGear

There seems to be no published information on whether or not the equipment involved in the Hollywood-Argentina smuggle was insured. If it wasn’t insured, no doubt, the owners of said equipment were likely kicking themselves after this massive theft occurred.

Avoid a similar fate by insuring your film equipment with Front Row under a DigiGear policy.

RELATED POSTS:

INSURANCE FOR THEFT OF CAMERA AND FILM EQUIPMENT

THEFT FROM VEHICLE: PHOTOGRAPHY INSURANCE EXPLAINED

HOW TO CALL A WRAP ON CLAIMS

CITATIONS:

https://news.sky.com/story/huge-haul-of-stolen-hollywood-film-equipment-found-in-argentina-11498283

Chubb PDF T3-FilmEqTheft-3-19 https://www.chubb.com

Topics: Film equipment insurance, Film Insurance, Film insurance broker, Film Equipment, digigear

Our winter newsletter is here!

Posted by David Hamilton on Feb 12, 2019 12:10:27 PM

pug-1210025_1920 (stay warm)

CLICK HERE to see the latest news from Front Row. 

Topics: Film Insurance, E&O Insurance, DICE Insurance, event insurance, art school insurance, Actor body insurance

Film Production Insurance for Renovation Shows

Posted by David Hamilton on Jan 9, 2019 3:09:19 PM

reno shows film insurance

film production insurance for renovation shows

Arranging film production insurance for your renovation (reno) show should be done with the help of a specialized entertainment insurance broker.

The following information is to be used as a general reference only and does not alter the insurance policy wording for your specific production. In all cases, actual coverage is subject to the policy language, terms and conditions of the long form policies to be issued by the insurance company. Additionally, the following is not intended to be legal advice but rather are general recommendations intended to reduce your exposure to an insurance claim. When entering contracts with anyone you should consult a lawyer to draft appropriate language for your specific circumstances and to ensure that you are adequately protected.

With renovation shows we suggest that you consider the following guidelines:
  • Hire a general contractor to oversee major changes and the general contractor should be responsible for hiring subcontractors.
  • Insist that the general contractor and subcontractors provide you with proof of liability insurance for their operations in the form of an insurance certificate issued by their insurance  company.
  • The insurance certificate should evidence coverage for Products and Completed Operations, should contain a cross liability and sever ability of interest clause and name the production company as an additional insured.
  • Homeowners should review and sign a release containing a hold harmless and waiver of subrogation clause against the production company.
  • Where possible homeowners should be included in the renovation decision making process for each change made.
  • Your contract with the general contractor should contain a hold harmless provision protecting prod co from any claims arising from work completed by the contractor.  You should also consider an indemnity provision requiring the contractor to pay you back for any expenses, claims or suits brought against you resulting from their negligence or faulty workmanship.
  • Have you made arrangements with the contractors to come back and fix problems with the homes?  Does the contractor provide a warranty on work performed?  The contract should be between the homeowner and general contractor (not the production company).

Ultimately the homeowner could sue the production company and the contractor if they feel work was poorly done but adopting some of the guidelines above, having contractors who are properly insured and including the homeowner in decisions being made would greatly reduce your exposure to loss.

Decorating shows that involve changing room colours and adding new furniture etc. are less risky than more major renovations but when you are working on any third party properties there is a greater risk of something going wrong. Use a specialized film insurance broker to ensure you are properly covered.

Topics: Film Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, Film insurance broker, Entertainment Insurance Broker

Filmmakers and Producers Insurance

Posted by David McLeish on Nov 5, 2018 12:18:55 PM

film producers insurance

film producers insurance

Let’s Make Art Together.

You’re a prolific filmmaker with a full production slate. Like most creative people, you‘d rather focus on your work. The problem is that since each project requires its own insurance policy, it often feels like the more you work, the more time you have to spend dealing with insurance!

Worse, while you’ve always received good service from your broker, they don’t quite “get” what it is you do. It’s a hassle getting certificates for your vendors and cast and crew. Too many irrelevant questions are asked by the underwriter. When something unusual comes up like a drone shoot or stunts, there are delays. There has to be a better way.

Luckily, there is. Unlike most insurance professionals in Canada, we specialize in the business of entertainment insurance. It’s not just what we do, and what we’re good at; it’s what we’re passionate about.

Front Row Insurance Brokers is the largest entertainment insurance brokerage by premium volume in Canada, with offices in Vancouver, Toronto, Montreal, Halifax, Nashville, Los Angeles, and New York.

In 2017, we insured over $4 billion of productions worldwide and wrote more than $45 million in film premium. The 38 dedicated film insurance staff in our Canadian offices are experts in TV and film production, so you know you’ll be dealing with someone who understands what you do. Even better, we have staff licensed in every province.

Filming in sunny Saskatchewan? No problem, we’ll get you covered. Perhaps most importantly, as part of our commitment to exceptional service, we will work hard to ensure that the money owed to you is paid if you ever need to make a claim under your policy.

Moreover, our excellent working relationship with the five major companies writing entertainment insurance in Canada ensures that you get more than just the best rates. It also affords us the opportunity to design studio programs which offer coverage tailored to the unique needs of your production slate. A studio program is a custom policy designed by the broker working in concert with the insurer. The advantage to you is that it’s designed around your specific production slate. You won’t have to pay for coverage you don’t require, and your policy will be customized for you by experts in entertainment insurance who understand your needs. Some examples of the benefits available under a studio program include:

  • No cast medicals required for film budgets under $15,000,000, rendering it unnecessary to schedule and attend tedious doctor exams, and saving you the $130 exam fee.
  • Automatic coverage for test shoots, promo shoots, pilots for budgets up to $50,000: no need to call us.
  • Quotations provided immediately for any new project. Rates locked for 12 months. Coverage can be activated and certificates issued on the same day for office rentals, payroll, etc.
  • Insurance wherever you film

Let us leverage your production slate, combined with our premium volume, for your advantage. We pride ourselves on being the simplest line item on your budget—fast, without the drama.

We can also offer you a Low-Claims Bonus: ask us how.

Topics: Short Film Insurance, Film Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, E&O Insurance, Cast Insurance, helicopter film insurance, Storm damage film production insurance, Flood insurance for Film, Chubb Film insurance, Film permission, Film Production Vehicle Insurance, automobile insurance for films, production liability insurance for films, Public Liability Insurance for Film, Film equipment rental insurance, Workers Compensation, insurance for film set, Film Extra Expense, film school insurance

Pre-Production Insurance for Filmmakers

Posted by David Hamilton on Oct 2, 2018 2:35:17 PM

Pre production photo lens

PRE-PRODUCTION INSURANCE

Keep a Minor Pratfall from Becoming Your Downfall

Ah, pre-production. You’re one small step closer to getting your project in the can! Your script treatments are finished, crew hired, and cast chosen. You’re ready to get started building sets, designing costumes, and planning your shooting schedule. Normally this is not the stage of the game where things go wrong, but let’s consider a couple of scenarios where something does:

  • A large set piece falls over and will need repair or replacement. It was needed in a key scene.
  • A pipe bursts in your production office and important documents are water-damaged.

A film producer’s risk policy (also called an “Entertainment Package Policy”), includes a number of coverages which protect you against situations like the above. These coverages include:

Extra Expense Insurance

EE is a type of business interruption coverage which covers you for delays caused by loss or damage to property or facilities used in connection with the production. In example #1 above, it would compensate you for the additional cost and time of replacing the damaged set piece.

Office Contents

This coverage offers protection against damage or loss to the contents of your production office, including but not limited to:

  • Furniture
  • Equipment
  • Fixtures
  • Improvements & betterments
  • Valuable Papers and Records (e.g., written film tape, disc, drum, cell, printed or otherwise inscribed documents and records including books, maps, abstracts, deeds, manuscripts or other magnetic recording or storage media)

Ensuring you have the right coverage for your production will provide peace of mind and allow you to focus on what’s important—making your film. Contact us today.

 

RELATED LINKS:

Film Insurance 101 & How to Protect Your Film Project

Film Production Insurance: Why it is needed

Pre-Production Insurance

Film Production Insurance

How the Premium is Determined

Short Film Insurance

DigiGear Insurance

Props/Sets/Wardrobe Insurance

E&O Insurance

DICE Insurance

Third Party Property Damage

Crew Vehicles

Umbrella Vs. Excess Liability

Commercial General Liability

Negative Film / Videotape and Faulty Stock

Workers Comp

Cast Insurance

Extra Expense (EE)

Foreign Locations

Claims

Topics: Film Insurance, pre production insurance for filmmakers

The Annual Film Production Insurance Package Made Easy

Posted by David Hamilton on Sep 13, 2017 4:46:15 PM

The Annual DICE Insurance Policy takes the hassle out of purchasing film insurance for your film productions. It is flexible, affordable, and customizable designed to fit your individual needs. 

This policy will not only save you time, it will also save you money. Insuring all your productions under one policy helps to cut the costs, as it will reduce the administrative expenses associated with insuring each production individually, and these savings are passed onto you.

The Annual DICE Policy is specially designed to provide:  insurance for commercials, documentary insurance, coporate video insurance,educational film insurance, music video insurance, training video insurance, short film insurance, and still photography insurance.

Check out our Infographic below for coupon savings and more.

DICE Infographic Hyperlink.jpg

Interested in seeing more? Visit the Front Row Insurance Website for a free no obligation quote!

Topics: Short Film Insurance, Film Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, Commercial Production Insurance, Documentary Insurance, DICE Insurance, corporate video insurance, music video insurance, Educational Film Insurance

Effortless and Affordable Short Term Film Insurance

Posted by David Hamilton on May 27, 2016 3:49:23 PM

short film insurance


Short film insurance can be arranged quickly through us, usually over the phone.  Our program is very popular with new and established film makers because of the low cost and the simple process to arrange a policy. 

Note that we can only assist individuals that live or have a company in Canada at this time; however, worldwide coverage is available to our Canadian film makers. 

To provide you with a short film insurance cost, we need a few details. The fastest way to receive a quote is to complete the short application telling us about your project by clicking the link below. 

Get a 2 Minute Quote

Short Term Equipment InsuranceWe can provide Short Term Equipment Insurance starting at $300!

If you would like to add film location liability for one week , we can do so for a small additional premium.

We can also provide affordable coverage for: 

If you would like an annual policy to cover multiple productions, please visit our D.I.C.E Page (Documentaries, Industrial Films, Commercials, Educational Films – it also covers short shoots, music videos and feature films with lower budgets).

Topics: Short Film Insurance, Film Insurance, Film insurance broker, Film Location Insurance

How a Specialized Film Insurance Broker can help your Production

Posted by David Hamilton on Feb 29, 2016 9:39:49 AM

But first, what are insurance brokers?

Insurance Brokers work for the client to represent their interests, negotiating the lowest possible premium and the broadest coverage available. This is very different from an insurance agent, who represents the interests of an insurer. Brokers must take on-going to courses to maintain their licenses, which must be renewed yearly. They must be insured in each province for which they provide advice, so producers should check to see that their broker is licensed in the province in which they will shoot to prevent the production company from being fined.

 

What is a brokerage?

logo5Front Row, for example, is a brokerage, housing a group of national experts – brokers who have specialized in the study and practice of insurance for film production, TV series, documentaries, webisodes, music videos and more. A brokerage must carry its own E&O insurance because brokers are responsible for their actions and can be sued for professional negligence if their advice is deemed to be faulty. It’s important to know the limit of the E&O insurance the brokerage holds:  $1,000,000 may not be enough once legal fees are deducted from the limit. The strength of a brokerage will determine its relationship with the four film insurance companies which underwrite productions in Canada: Chubb, Fireman’s Fund, Everest and Travelers.  Because of its size and specialization, Front Row has a unique relationship with these insurers, allowing its brokers to get the best coverage at the best price from the right insurer.

 

What can a specialized broker do for you?

  • Make sure the insurance company pays the amount of the claim you are entitled to
  • Help you to understand the specific language shown on Film Production Policies
  • Act as a conduit between you and the insurance company. This includes providing certificates for banks, bonding companies and locations to evidence coverage allowing banks to release funds to the client, locations to be locked by the location manager and equipment to be rented
  • Advise you on ways to limit potential liabilities during production
  • Review your existing insurance policies to reveal gaps or deficiencies in the coverage
  • Comprehensively review your production to assess the amount and type of insurance required
  • Help you understand what coverage you have and do not have and explain any limits to the coverage

 

Some tips on working with a broker

  •          Make sure they are licensed wherever you shoot
  •          Ask about their E&O coverage
  •          Make sure they offer specialized, knowledgeable advice in a clear and easy-to read format

 

Topics: Film Insurance, Film insurance broker, Entertainment Insurance Broker, Camera Insurance Broker

FILM PRODUCTION INSURANCE PREMIUMS: ONE WAY TO SAVE MONEY

Posted by David Hamilton on Jun 30, 2014 5:03:00 PM

Film set outdoors

save money on your film insurance premium

One of the simplest ways to reduce film production insurance premiums is to lower the net insurable budget. The net insurable budget is the amount left once various budget line items are removed from the definition of insurable costs. The rate that is negotiated with the insurance company is applied against the net budget.

A typical rate might be .70 cents per hundred dollars of net budget depending on the current insurance market conditions. To illustrate, let us assume a cable TV movie needs to be insured with a budget of $2,000,000. Typically, we would remove the following line items as costs that do not need to be insured: 

  1. Story and scenario - we will assume this amount is $50,000 (I know, writers are never paid enough).
  2. Post Production costs - we will assume this amount is $200,000

Claims that happen during post production are covered; however, due to the low risk of claims in post, the insurance company does not apply rate to post costs which is why it has been removed.

$2,000,000 less script and post costs leaves a net insurable budget of $1,750,000. $1,750,000 times the negotiated rate of .70 results in a premium of $12,250. If the net were less than $1,750,000 the premium would go down.

Other budget costs to consider removing from our sample budget might be:

  1. Producer fees ($50,000)
  2. Development ($20,000)
  3. Publicity ($5,000)
  4. Overhead ($35,000)
  5. 50% of contingency ($25,000)

Removing the above items would lower the net insurable budget by $135,000 to $1,615,000 and would result in a premium savings of $945.

Once the budgeted cost is removed from the net insurable budget, it is no longer insured in the event of a claim so producers need to be sure before removing anything from the insured budget.

As specialized film insurance brokers, we can help guide you to an appropriate net insurable budget for your film production.

Related Post: FILM PRODUCTION INSURANCE: HOW THE PREMIUM IS DETERMINED

Topics: Short Film Insurance, Film Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, Film Production Insurance Premiums, film insurance premium