US Filmmakers: Navigating Your Certificate of Insurance

Posted by Alyson Forster on Aug 4, 2020 7:12:51 AM

US Filmmakers: Navigating Your Certificate of Insurance

If you’re a Canada-based filmmaker, read this blog post instead.

Congratulations, you successfully purchased your production insurance! Your broker has sent you a confirmation that your coverage is bound, a summary, invoice, and certificate of insurance. You review all of your paperwork and estimates from the rental house and permit office, but how do you know what coverage is what, or if you even purchased the correct coverage?

things that may go missed on a certificate that can ‘make or break’ you on the day of production:

  1. Make sure the production company’s name and address are correct. Rushed through the application? This is the time to triple check any spelling errors.
  2. If you are working (especially) on a Short-Term Production (US), double-check the effective dates. Make sure you include any additional pickup/drop-off dates that may be needed for props or rentals.
  3. Did a permit office request any special wording? This is the time to make sure you have the exact wording on your certificate as the insurance requirements noted.

Below is a sample certificate. We will review each section so you can properly understand what you are looking at.

US Certificate of Insurance

Ok, so from the top!

The highlighted section on the left is where your company information is located.

The highlighted section on the right is your insurance company. You will notice it shows insurer “A” and insurer “B”. This will correspond to the boxes on the far left side to show which company is which.

The non-highlighted section below is your insurance broker’s information.

US Certificate of Insurance

This next part is VERY important, especially when it comes to Film LA. See the box that says “ADDL INSR”? That stands for Additional Insured, and the “Y” stands for yes. Next to that column, there is wording “SUBR WVD” this stands for Waiver of Subrogation.

This is a waiver that you must request in advance and most likely will cost additional premium. Without a “Y” under “ADDL INSR” and “SUBR WVD”- your insurance coverage will not be sufficient for Film LA.

The next part of the “grid” will delegate the policy number and the start and end dates of coverage. If you need additional days for a short shoot, reach out to your broker immediately. If you request additional coverage dates after the expiration of coverage, you will be responsible for purchasing a new policy.

The bottom right highlighted section is what your rental/prop house will review. Keep in mind, this amount is not the value to rent the equipment. The amount is to replace the item in the case of a total loss.

The section ‘ded’ that is highlighted stands for your retention or deductible. The deductible or retention is the amount you will have to pay the insurance company in a case of a loss that exceeds the deductible.

Example: You rent a camera that has a replacement value of $50,000. The camera gets lost in transit. This means that for the insurance company to replace the camera, you will have to pay the deductible amount.

Example: You rent a grip accessory and the replacement value is $150. The grip accessory is damaged during the shoot. Since the accessories replacement value is less than the deductible, the insurance company will not cover the loss.

US Certificate of Insurance

Note: Remember insurer “A” and insurer “B”? You can now see them on the far right column.

This row on your certificate is where any special wording would be located. If you need a rental house to be named additional insured, this is where the wording would be located.

US Certificate of Insurance

Note: Whenever there is a need for special wording on your certificate, please notify your broker. This is something only your broker can process.

Last section! So, the certificate holder will be the entity that requested to be named additional insured, loss payee, or certificate holder. If a rental house has requested to be named additional insured, this is where you would find their name and address.

US Certificate of Insurance

 

About: Front Row Insurance Brokers Inc. is an independent insurance broker that provides film insurance for a very low cost. Should a claim occur, Front Row works diligently with insurers and clients to expedite the payment of claims.

Related:

Canadian Filmmakers: Certificate of Insurance

Getting a film permit in Los Angeles / Film LA

DISCLAIMER: Informational statements regarding insurance coverage are for general description purposes only. These statements do not amend, modify or supplement any insurance policy. Consult the actual policy or your broker for details regarding terms, conditions, coverage, exclusions, products, services and programs which may be available to you. Your eligibility for particular products and services is subject to the final determination of underwriting qualifications and acceptance by the insurance underwriting company providing such products or services. This website does not make any representations that coverage does or does not exist for any particular claim or loss, or type of claim or loss, under any policy. Whether coverage exists or does not exist for any particular claim or loss under any policy depends on the facts and circumstances involved in the claim or loss and all applicable policy wording.

Topics: Short Film Insurance, Film Production, Film Producers, Annual Film Insurance, Film production offices, Film Production Companies, US Film insurance broker, Certificates

Canadian Filmmakers: Navigating Your Certificate of Insurance

Posted by Alyson Forster on Aug 4, 2020 7:12:08 AM

Canadian Filmmakers: Navigating Your Certificate of Insurance

If you’re a US-based filmmaker, read this blog post instead.

Congratulations, you successfully purchased your production insurance! Your broker has sent you a confirmation that your coverage is bound, a summary, invoice, and certificate of insurance. You review all of your paperwork and estimates from the rental house and permit office, but how do you know what coverage is what, or if you even purchased the correct coverage?

things that may go missed on a certificate that can ‘make or break’ you on the day of production:

  1. Make sure the production company’s name and address are correct. Rushed through the application? This is the time to triple check any spelling errors.
  2. If you are working (especially) on a Short-Term Production, double-check the effective dates. Make sure you include any additional pickup/drop-off dates that may be needed for props or rentals.
  3. Did a permit office request any special wording? This is the time to make sure you have the exact wording on your certificate as the insurance requirements noted.

Below is a sample certificate of insurance for Canadian film productions. We will review each section so you can properly understand what you are looking at.

Certificate of Insurance Canada

Ok, so from the top!

The highlighted section below is where your company information is located.

The non-highlighted section below is your insurance broker’s information.

Certificate of Insurance Canada

The next part of the first page will delegate the policy number and the start and end dates of coverage. If you need additional days for a short shoot, reach out to your broker immediately. If you request additional coverage dates after the expiration of coverage, you will be responsible for purchasing a new policy.

Certificate of Insurance Canada

If a permit office, rental house, or specific entity you are working with has requested special wording on a certificate, it will go here. If you do need special wording on your certificate, please make sure you reach out to your broker in advance. Special wording or endorsements such as a “Waiver of Subrogation” may take up to 24-48 hours to process from the carrier.

Certificate of Insurance Canada

The following pages of your certificate of insurance will outline the limits of insurance and retention or deductible. The deductible or retention is the amount you will have to pay the insurance company in a case of a loss that exceeds the deductible, and is located on the far right column.

Example: You rent a camera that has a replacement value of $50,000. The camera gets lost in transit. This means that for the insurance company to replace the camera, you will have to pay the deductible amount.

Example: You rent a grip accessory and the replacement value is $150. The grip accessory is damaged during the shoot. Since the accessory’s replacement value is less than the deductible, the insurance company will not cover the loss.

Certificate of Insurance Canada Schedule AHave more questions on the coverages on the far left column? Contact us.

 

About: Front Row Insurance Brokers Inc. is an independent insurance broker that provides film insurance for a very low cost. Should a claim occur, Front Row works diligently with insurers and clients to expedite the payment of claims.

Related:

US Filmmakers: Certificate of Insurance

DISCLAIMER: Informational statements regarding insurance coverage are for general description purposes only. These statements do not amend, modify or supplement any insurance policy. Consult the actual policy or your broker for details regarding terms, conditions, coverage, exclusions, products, services and programs which may be available to you. Your eligibility for particular products and services is subject to the final determination of underwriting qualifications and acceptance by the insurance underwriting company providing such products or services. This website does not make any representations that coverage does or does not exist for any particular claim or loss, or type of claim or loss, under any policy. Whether coverage exists or does not exist for any particular claim or loss under any policy depends on the facts and circumstances involved in the claim or loss and all applicable policy wording.

Topics: Short Film Insurance, Film Insurance, Film Production, Film Producers, Annual Film Insurance, Film Production Companies, Film Location Insurance, Certificates

Film Production Insurance: How the Premium is Determined

Posted by David Hamilton on Jun 21, 2010 2:46:00 PM

Film set
FILM PRODUCTION INSURANCE: HOW THE PREMIUM IS DETERMINED

Usually the cost of film production insurance is determined by charging a pre-determined rate against the net insurable budget of the production. The net insurable budget is calculated by removing those items out of the gross budget that the client does not want to insure (i.e., Unit Publicity, Insurance, and General Expense). The film insurance rates will vary from production to production and depend on criteria such as:

  • Type of production (i.e. Feature vs. TV series)
  • Inclusion of any stunts or special effects
  • Any work in or around water
  • Aerial work
  • Locations outside Canada/US

Most of these factors will cause the film insurance premium to increase. The rate from the insurance company is applied against net insurable budget to determine the final premium. The number of episodes and length of production rarely have an impact on price. The only time this would have an impact is if it were a very short shoot and we could offer a short term policy. This type of policy would offer very limited coverages and would usually only offer coverage for 7 days or less.

In addition to the rate and net insurable, the Insurance Companies have a minimum premium that they have to charge for a policy to ensure they can cover all of the administration costs of issuing and servicing the policies. Their minimum premium threshold might cause two difference projects which have different budgets, to still have the same premium. This is usually the case in lower budget projects. The Insurance Company is stuck charging a minimum premium as they have to absorb the same administrative costs no matter what the budget of the production.

Related Post: FILM PRODUCTION INSURANCE PREMIUMS: ONE WAY TO SAVE MONEY

Related Video: WHAT IS A PREMIUM? WHAT IS A DEDUCTIBLE?

RELATED LINKS:

Film Insurance 101 & How to Protect Your Film Project

Film Production Insurance: Why it is needed

Pre-Production Insurance

Film Production Insurance

How the Premium is Determined

Short Film Insurance

DigiGear Insurance

Props/Sets/Wardrobe Insurance

E&O Insurance

DICE Insurance

Third Party Property Damage

Crew Vehicles

Umbrella Vs. Excess Liability

Commercial General Liability

Negative Film / Videotape and Faulty Stock

Workers Comp

Cast Insurance

Extra Expense (EE)

Foreign Locations

Claims

Topics: Film Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, Annual Film Insurance, Commercial Production Insurance, Documentary Insurance, film insurance premium, DICE Insurance

Film Insurance Claims: What to Do When Film Production Stops

Posted by David Hamilton on Feb 27, 2010 12:48:00 PM

FILM INSURANCE CLAIMS

Claims image

Film Production Insurance claims can be settled quickly with a minimum of stress if the right steps are followed.

Front Row Insurance Brokers Inc. provides claims reporting, monitoring, and advocacy services for clients, including preparing and reviewing loss runs and developing claims procedures. We are a liaison between you and your insurance company or a third party adjuster. The primary goal is to provide you with knowledgeable, empathetic, fast service. In the event of a claim, please contact your account executive. 

Our services include designing and implementing claims reporting and handling procedures, monitoring losses to initiate necessary action on a client’s behalf, ensuring timely and equitable settlement of claims, and providing status reports on all monitored claims.

Your account executive will need to know:

  • Date of Loss
  • Description of Loss
  • Location and time of loss
  • Approximate amount of loss
  • Names and phone numbers of persons to be contacted

All incidences should be reported promptly. If you are not sure there is coverage, we can advise you. Most coverages have deductibles which are applied to each claim. Each loss or occurrence is determined to be a separate claim and subject to a separate deductible.

No loss is easy to endure, but there are steps you can take to speed the process of putting your operations back in order.

Whom Should I call first if I have a loss? Depending on the nature of the incident, or accident, call the authorities needed to assist you in an emergency: the police, the fire department or hazardous materials team.

Is it possible to take immediate action to make repairs if further damage to the property is likely? As long as the claim is covered, the reasonable cost of temporary repairs made to prevent further damage is money well-spent and, therefore, reimbursable, subject to all policy terms and conditions.

Documentation in the form of bills, receipts and photographs should be retained in order to verify damages and repair costs. 

What about Emergency Repairs? You may hire a contractor of your choice for emergency repairs. For a covered loss, we will discuss costs directly with your contractor and come to an agreement about costs when necessary. Again, all repairs will be made subject to all policy terms and conditions.

Once Emergency Repairs are made, what should I do next? Determine if any of your property is salvageable, and if you can continue your operations at this location.

Who is responsible for the settlement of my claim? My agent or broker, the contractor, the insurance adjuster? What is the relationship among all of them?

  • Our insurance adjuster is the person with whom you should deal with settling any claim.
  • The adjuster will evaluate the loss and, along with your agent or broker, explain coverage to you.
  • The adjuster will work with your contractor to agree on what repairs need to be done and proper costs of these repairs.
  • The agent or broker may assist both you and the insurance company in the processing and adjustment of the claim.

After any type of loss:

  • Take immediate steps to protect your property from further damage.
  • Photograph the damage, if possible.
  • Call your insurance agent or broker.
  • Obtain copies of any reports that were filed, such as police reports, fire department reports.
  • Retain any documentation to substantiate the claim.
  • Communicate frequently with the insurance company’s claim adjuster.
Front Row Insurance Brokers Inc. provides claims reporting, monitoring and advocacy service to clients. A claims coordinator is assigned and acts as a liaison between our clients and their insurance company or third party.
 
Our goals are:
  • Clients feel that their best interests are being served and that their claims are being actively managed.
  • Front Row Insurance Brokers' performance is technically sound and conducted in such a manner as to fulfill a professional role.
  • For every first party claim, the best settlement is obtained in the shortest possible time.
  • System and individual file records are maintained at a consistently high standard to ensure that they accurately reflect the current status of individual claims.

RELATED LINKS:

Film Insurance 101 & How to Protect Your Film Project

Film Production Insurance: Why it is needed

Pre-Production Insurance

Film Production Insurance

How the Premium is Determined

Short Film Insurance

DigiGear Insurance

Props/Sets/Wardrobe Insurance

E&O Insurance

DICE Insurance

Third Party Property Damage

Crew Vehicles

Umbrella Vs. Excess Liability

Commercial General Liability

Negative Film / Videotape and Faulty Stock

Workers Comp

Cast Insurance

Extra Expense (EE)

Foreign Locations

Claims

Topics: Short Film Insurance, Film Insurance, Entertainment Insurance, Film insurance broker, Film Producer's E&O Insurance, Film Insurance claims, Annual Film Insurance, Documentary Insurance, DICE Insurance, Film Production Companies